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I-1.0 STUDENT HEALTH

I-1.1 GENERAL STUDENT HEALTH

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.1 General Student Health


Policy Statement:

General Student Health

  1. Each student will have the health section of the enrollment card filled out by their parent/guardian as part of school enrollment. 
  2. Students will not be allowed at school without the health information on file in the front office.
  3. Parents of students who have specific or special health concerns, chronic illness, or in need of medication during school hours must fill out a "health alert form" (available at the front desk).  This information will be given to the school nurse, and (all Health Alert Forms are kept in a binder in alphabetical order.  If the student needs meds administered by office staff there must be a Medical Administration Form must be filled out by the parent and the family doctor.  The Medical Administration Form is attached to the student's Health Alert Form.  An expandable file with the student's name will be placed in the medical drawer with the medication for that student.  A Medication Log is kept in the same drawer with a form for each student to record the date and time the medications were administered.). each student who has a form will have a red "health alert" folder which will be kept at the school office.  This folder will contain information on procedures to follow in case of illness or emergency, as well as any necessary parental permission.
  4. Parents should immediately notify the school if their student(s) start or stop medications so the "health alert form" can be created or updated and school be prepared should an emergency occur.
  5. Teachers will be given health files on students with health concerns, chronic illnesses or who take daily medication administered during school hours.  Teachers will keep health files on these students readily available to them.  At the end of the school year, the classroom Health Alert file is returned to the office to be shredded.  The complete Health Alert Binder is archived by administration.
  6. At the beginning of each school year, staff will receive their health alert files and each student's needs will be discussed by the teacher, office staff and director with the APA nurse.
  7. If a staff member has a concern regarding a student's health, they should bring the student to the school office immediately.


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I-1.2 IMMUNIZATIONS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.2 Immunizations


Policy Statement:

Immunizations

As of February 2015, every student must be immunized according to the schedule below before entering school.  Prior to school, every student must have the following immunizations:


  • DTaP/DTP/DT/Tdap
    • 3 doses of Td, including one Tdap, if the series was started after age 7
    • 4 doses if the 4th dose was given after the 4th birthday
    • 5 doses if the 4th dose was given before the 4th birthday
  • Polio
    • 3 doses if the 3rd dose was given after the 4th birthday
    • 4 doses if the 3rd dose was given before the 4th birthday
  • 2 doses of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR)
  • 3 doses of Hepatitis B 
  • 2 dose of Varicella (chickenpox) or history of disease is acceptable, a parent must sign the verification statement on the school immunization record.
  • 2 doses of Hepatitis A 
  • 1 additional dose of Tdap prior to entering 7th grade  
  • 1 dose of Meningococcal prior to entering 7th grade


The data is to be tabulated on a Utah Certificate of Immunization form and signed by your physician.  Parents need to bring the original to the school for verification.  The school will make a copy of the certificate and put it in the student file.


Comment:

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I-1.3 STUDENT MEDICATIONS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.3 Student Medications 


Policy Statement:

Medications

Policy Statement:

  1. Students that are administered, self-administer, retain, or possess medications, whether prescription or non-prescription, are prohibited from sharing, selling, or distributing medications for any reason. The District recommends that parents counsel students regarding the dangers of using medications in a manner that is not prescribed by a physician or in a manner other than as directed by the manufacturer.
  2. “Medication” under this policy refers to a substance used to treat a medical condition. For the purposes of this policy, that term does not include prohibited or illegal substances, nor does it refer to personal care products such as lip balm, lotion, sunscreen, contact solution, cough drops, etc.

American Preparatory Academy recognizes that some students need to receive medication during the school day and delegates to the Administration appropriate guidelines for administering medication to students in accordance with Utah Code §53G-9-502 et seq. and for the self-administration of medication by the student.

 

General Provisions

School personnel may administer medication to students while the student is under the supervision of the school in accordance with this policy and Utah Code 53G-9-502 et seq.

Self-administration of medication by students shall be allowed under the procedures specified in Administering Medication at School.

  1. School-Administered Medication
    1. School personnel may administer prescription medication to a student during the regular school day only when the medication has been prescribed by the student’s licensed health care provider and the school Administration received:
      1. A current, Health Alert Form signed by the student’s parent or legal guardian; and
      2. A current Medication Authorization Form completed by the health care provider that includes the following:
        1. A statement that administration of medication by school employees during periods when the student is under the control of the school is medically necessary, and
        2. A statement that describes the route, dosage, time schedule for administration, name of medication, name of student diagnosis, side effects, and duration of the treatment.
  2. The Medication Authorization Form must be resubmitted at the beginning of each school year the medication is administered, and as medication is prescribed or changed.
  3. Oral, topical, inhalant medication or injectable epinephrine may be administered by school personnel who have been certified by the school nurse to administer medication if the provisions outlined in section c-ii have been met.

i. Medications requiring other routes of administration will not be given by school personnel, unless delegated by a registered nurse in accordance with the Utah Nurse Practice Act (Rule R156-31b).

ii. Medication administration cannot be delegated to non-licensed personnel, may only be administered by a licensed nurse.

  1. All medication that is to be given at school must be furnished by the parent or guardian and delivered to the school by a responsible adult.
  2. All prescription medication must be in the original container labeled by the pharmacy with the name of the student, the name of the health care provider, the name of the medication, the dosage, the time the medication is administered, and the route.   All the medication on the label must be identical to the information specified on the Medication Authorization Form signed by the health care provider.
  3. Non-prescription (over-the-counter) medication must be submitted in the original container and be labeled with the student’s name.  The name of the medication and dosage indicated on the label must be identical to the name of the medication and dosage specified on the Medication Authorization Form.
  4. All school personnel who are assigned and/or authorized to administer student medication must receive yearly in-service training and certification provided by the school nurse.
  5. A record including the name of medication, the dosage of medication, and the time of day it was administered must be kept for each student receiving medication at school.  The person administering the medication must initial the record each time medication is given.
  6. School personnel who administer medication to students in compliance with the Medication Authorization Form signed by the health care provider are not liable, civilly or criminally, for any adverse reaction suffered by the student as a result of taking the medication or the school’s discontinuing the administration of the medication under these guidelines.
  7. Unused or discontinued medication must be picked up by a responsible adult within two weeks following the last dose administered.  All medication must also be picked up by a responsible adult at the end of the school year.  Medication remaining at the school after this time should be destroyed according to directives by the District nurse.
  8. Parents must administer the first dose of any medication (either over the counter or prescription) at home to monitor any potentially adverse reactions.
  9. Medication that was previously given at school, and requires a dosage change, is considered a new medication; there for the first dose cannot be administered by school personnel.
  10. Siblings in elementary school may share the same medication such as a metered dose inhaler, epi-pen, over the counter medications, and prescription medications provided:
  11. School personnel may only administer medications they have been specifically trained and certified to administer.  If school personnel receive a medication for which they are unsure or are unfamiliar, the assigned school nurse should be contacted to verify.
      1. A completed Medication Authorization Form signed by the parent is received for each student.
      2. The medication contains a label with each student’s individual name as well as all pertinent information
      3. All medication being shared by siblings must remain in the main office for trained staff to monitor when it needs to be administered. 

Self-Administration of Medication

The Administration authorizes the following administrative policy provisions for self-administration of medication by students.

  1. Elementary and secondary students may retain and self-administer epinephrine (Epipens), insulin, or asthma medication (inhaler) if a parent/guardian completes a current Authorization form that includes a statement from the student’s health care provider (physician, dentist, nurse practitioner, or physician’s assistant) that the student is capable of carrying and 4 self-administering his or her own medication, and that it is medically necessary for them to keep the medication at all times.

  2.  Secondary students may retain and self-administer medications subject to the following guidelines:
    1. Prescription medications may be retained and self-administered provided that students shall not possess more than one day’s dose of prescription or over-the-counter medication at school.
    2. Prescription and non-prescription medications shall be taken only as directed by a prescription or manufacturer’s directions.
    3. Prescription and non-prescription medication, shall not be sold, shared, or distributed to others. Distribution of any drug or medication from one student to another will be considered Dangerous and Disruptive Conduct and shall be dealt with according to the provisions of APA’s Code of Conduct Policy.
    4. Authorization for the ability to carry and/or self-administer medication may be denied or withdrawn by the school director after consultation with the assigned school nurse at any time following actual notice to the student’s parent or guardian. 

Specific Medication Laws

Under the direction of the school nurse and consistent with the other provisions of this policy, schools shall abide by state laws and rules related to specific medication,

including those medications addressed in this section. In particular, District nurses shall provide appropriate training to school personnel regarding procedures of administration of identified medications, emergency response protocols, appropriate notice to parents/guardians, proper documentation, and other requirements.

Certain medications are not to be delegated by law to unlicensed personnel.  According to the Nurse Practice Act (R156-31b-701a), the licensed nurse shall not delegate any task requiring the specialized knowledge, judgment and skill of a licensed nurse to unlicensed assistive personnel.  Delegation of certain medications will therefore be determined on a case by case basis to determine medical necessity, safety, and feasibility of administration based on the aforementioned criteria.

  1. Asthma Medications
    1. Asthma medications shall be administered in accordance to Utah Code, 53G-9-503.
  2. Epinephrine Auto-Injector
    1. Epinephrine auto-injectors shall be administered in accordance to Utah Code, 26-41-101.
    2. If epinephrine is administered to a student, 911 shall be called and the parent/guardian shall be notified.
  3. Glucagon-Diabetes Emergency Medication
    1. Glucagon shall be administered in accordance to Utah Code, 53A-11-603.
    2. If glucagon is administered to a student, 911 shall be called and the parent/guardian shall be notified.

4. Emergency Seizure Medication

Upon request from a parent, the school will create a Seizure Rescue Authorization in the form of a 504 plan.

The 504 plan will include the following information:

    1. Name the medication, dose, instructions for administration.
    2. Ensure that it is prescribed – check box and signature
    3. Assurance listed and signed that the parents have previously administered it unsupervised without complication.
    4. A request from the parents that the school identify and train volunteers who will receive training and be willing to administer rescue medication.
    5. An authorization from the school and the parent to the volunteers giving them the permission to administer the medication according to the 504.

Emergency seizure medications shall only be administered in accordance with Utah Code, 53A-11-603.5 and Utah Administrative Code, R156-31b- 701a.

    1. If seizures are full-body, tonic-clonic, emergency seizure medication may be administered by a volunteer trained by a District nurse as outlined in the student’s individualized health care plan.
    2. The student must have received a first dose of this medication outside school in a non-medically-supervised setting and ceased having a full body, prolonged, or convulsive seizure without other complications.
    3. If an emergency medication is administered to a student, 911 shall be called and the parent/guardian shall be notified.
    5. Naloxone
    1. Naloxone shall only be administered in accordance with Utah Code, 26- 55-101 et seq.
    2. If naloxone is administered to a student, 911 shall be called and the parent/guardian shall be notified.

Essential Oils

    1. Essential Oils may be used as an alternative treatment for headache or other clearly identified use.  Written permission must accompany oils used by elementary students.  Secondary students may use oil at their own discretion.
    2. Oil must be in original container
    3. Oil should not be share among students. 

When To Call 911

Certain Medical conditions requiring immediate emergency medical response include:

  1. Unconscious-unresponsive to stimuli
  2. Anaphylaxis – severe allergic reaction requiring use of Epi Pen.  Paramedics MUST be called whenever a student is required to use an Epi Pen.
  3. Stroke – sudden slurred speech, blindness., numbness, lack of feeling on one side, or lack of coordination.
  4. Bleeding- uncontrolled bleeding, including uncontrolled nose bleeds, vomiting blood. 
  5. Shock- rapid or shallow breathing, cold or clammy skin.
  6. Broken bones visible through an open wound.  A finger or other extremity is cut off.
  7. Severe cuts- including eye, head and abdominal, or whenever bleeding cannot be safely stopped.
  8. Possible overdose – when stocked Narcan is administered
  9. Seizure Rescue Medication is administered
  10. Diabetic patient is unconscious or difficult to rouse.
  11. Severe asthma attack. 

References:

Utah Code, 26-41-101

Utah Code, 26-55-101 Utah Code, 53A-11-601 Utah Code, 53A-11-602 Utah Code, 53A-11-603 Utah Code, 53A-11-603.5

Utah Admin. Code, R156-31b


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I-1.4 STAFF MEDICAL TRAINING

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.4 Staff Medical Training


Policy Statement:

Epi-pen Training

As provided by Utah Code, the school shall provide the opportunity for Epi-Pen training upon the request of staff members.  The school shall ensure an Epi-pen is available at the school for use by trained persons. 


First Aid Training

The school shall ensure that at least two persons on staff are trained and currently certified in First Aid and CPR.  The school shall pay for the cost of certification.  Administering medications to students by school staff is not authorized except as allowed by law AND as authorized in writing by a medical doctor.  Parents or legal guardians are authorized to administer legal and lawful necessary medications at recommended and appropriate doses on campus.  Staff shall encourage student to clean their own wounds, and if assisting, may only use soap and water.  As prescribed by law, staff may not use (or allow students to self-administer), antiseptic wipes or anti-bacterial crèmes or medications.  Staff shall comply with the schools written Blood-Borne Pathogens Policy.  Staff shall contact a student's parent or legal guardian when accidents or illnesses of significance are reported.  


Head Injury Training

American Preparatory Academy has established a protocol to provide education about concussion for coaches, school personnel, parents, and students.  This protocol outlines procedures for staff to follow in identifying, treating, and appropriately referring concussed students.  School policy is specified as to return-to-activity issues following a concussion (see I-2.4 Response to Head Injury).

The school's Academic Director shall appoint a School Concussion Specialist.  In coordination with Physical Education InstructorsSchool Secretaries, and Administrative Director, the School Concussion Specialist shall review this protocol annually.  Any changes or modifications will be provided in writing by July 1st to the school's Academic Director.  The Academic Director will annually ensure that (1) the updates are included in staff policy books, written parent notification, and the school website; (2) all staff and coaches are trained in concussion identification, response procedures and return-to-activity policies; and (3) parents receive, sign and return the "Acknowledgement of Head Injury Policy" form.

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I-1.5 AIR QUALITY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.5 Air Quality


Policy Statement:

Air Quality

  1. The school shall check the air quality index from KSL (https://www.ksl.com/weather/airQuality) or other reliable source, when there is a yellow or red air quality day. 
  2. The school secretary will forward air quality information to the Director and staff.
  3. The Director shall determine if inside recess is appropriate to avoid hazardous air quality for individual students or for the school at large.
  4. If parents wish their student(s) to stay inside on a particular air quality day, they need to fill out a health alert form and return it to the school office, outlining the parent's directions to the teacher.  The school may require written verification by a medical doctor.

 

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 I-1.6 SCHOOL LUNCH

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.6 School Lunch


Policy Statement:

School Lunch

Parents are expected to provide a nutritious lunch for their student(s) each day.  We recommend that parents provide a lunch that contains recommended foods for growing children, including fresh fruits and vegetables.  Lunches that consist of a bag of chips and a sweet drink are not considered nutritious.  Sometimes older students are left with the responsibility of packing their own lunch and they[c1]  choose items that are not nutritious or substantial enough to get them through the afternoon.  Some parents have felt this is a natural consequence and use this as a way to teach their child responsibility.   We urge parents to find other ways to teach those important lessons so that their child's education does not suffer.  It is the parent's responsibility to ensure the student has healthy food in their lunch each day.  Supervising lunch staff will encourage students to eat their lunch.

Beverages:  American Prep participates in the government grant program that provides milk to our students each day at no charge to families.  No soda or drinks containing stimulants of any kind, including caffeine or herbal stimulants, are allowed at school. 

At times, students may consume food at school that parents do not send - for example, by trading lunch items, or receiving a birthday treat or having special food at a culminating activity.  It is imperative that parents disclose any food allergies to the school by filling out a Health Alert form so that precautions can be taken to prevent allergic reactions in students.

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I-1.7 SALE OF FOOD

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.7 Sale of Food


Policy Statement:

Policy Regarding the Sale of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value

  1. Policy Regarding Vending Machines: American Preparatory Academy does not participate in the sale of foodstuffs from vending machines. "Vending machine" means a self-service device that, upon insertion of a coin, paper currency, token, card or key, dispenses unit servings of food in bulk or in packages. 
  2. Policy Regarding Other Food Sales on Campus: The sale of foods of low nutritional value at American Preparatory Academy is prohibited. "Foods of minimal nutritional value" as provided in 7 CFR 210, Appendix B, are: 
    1. Soda Water--A class of beverages made by absorbing carbon dioxide in potable water. The amount of carbon dioxide used is not less than that which will be absorbed by the beverage at a pressure of one atmosphere and at a temperature of 60 deg F. It either contains no alcohol or only such alcohol, not in excess of 0.5 percent by weight of the finished beverage, as is contributed by the flavoring ingredient used. No product shall be excluded from this definition because it contains artificial sweeteners or discrete nutrients added to the food such as vitamins, minerals and protein;
    2. Water Ices--As defined by 21 CFR 135.160 Food and Drug Administration Regulations except that water ices which contain fruit or fruit juices are not included in this definition;
    3. Chewing Gum--Flavored products from natural or synthetic gums and other ingredients which form an insoluble mass for chewing;
    4. Certain Candies--Processed foods made predominantly from sweeteners or artificial sweeteners with a variety of minor ingredients which characterize the following types:
      1. Hard Candy--A product made predominantly from sugar (sucrose) and corn syrup which may be flavored and colored, is characterized by a hard, brittle texture, and includes such items as sour balls, fruit balls, candy sticks, lollipops, starlight mints, after dinner mints, sugar wafers, rock candy, cinnamon candies, breath mints, jaw breakers and cough drops;
      2. Jellies and Gums--A mixture of carbohydrates which are combined to form a stable gelatinous system of jelly-like character, and are generally flavored and colored, and include gum drops, jelly beans, jellied and fruit-flavored slices;
      3. Marshmallow Candies--An aerated confection composed as sugar, corn syrup, invert sugar, 20 percent water and gelatin or egg white to which flavors and colors may be added;
      4. Fondant--A product consisting of microscopic-sized sugar crystals which are separated by thin film of sugar and/or invert sugar in solution such as candy corn, soft mints;
      5. Licorice--A product made predominantly from sugar and corn syrup which is flavored with an extract made from the licorice root;
      6. Spun Candy--A product that is made from sugar that has been boiled at high temperature and spun at a high speed in a special machine; and
      7. Candy Coated Popcorn--Popcorn which is coated with a mixture made predominantly from sugar and corn syrup.
  3. "Vending machine" means a self-service device that, upon insertion of a coin, paper currency, token, card or key, dispenses unit servings of food in bulk or in packages.
  4. "Unit" means per container, package or amount served.

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I-1.8 STUDENT ASSISTANT SAFETY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 1.0 Student Health

Section 1.8 Student Assistant Safety


Policy Statement:

  1. Due to the dangerous tools in the workroom (such as cutting boards), students are not allowed in the workroom
  2. Students may not enter the Teachers' Workroom except as authorized by administration (after appropriate training from office staff).  Students may never clear paper jams in copiers or troubleshoot other equipment.  Students shall only use paper slicers after appropriate training by classroom or office staff.
  3. Students may not push audiovisual (AV) carts or other carts that exceed a height of 60" (5 feet).  AV carts shall ideally have a base that is 27" deep or greater.

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I-2.0 ILLNESS OR ACCIDENT

I-2.1 ILLNESS DURING THE SCHOOL DAY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 2.0 Illness or Accident

Section: 2.1 Illness During the School Day


Policy Statement:

Illness During the School Day

If a student becomes ill during the school day, the teacher should send the student to the school office.  Students are not generally allowed to call home during the school day.  The school secretary will attempt to determine the nature and severity of the illness, and may contact the student's parents to come and pick them up.  Students who are ill (fever's in excess of 100° F, vomiting, excessive coughing, runny nose and/or eyes) must be picked up immediately from school. 

If a parent cannot be reached, the emergency contact listed on the student enrollment form will be notified to come and pick up the student.  If a student feels ill but there are no obvious symptoms of illness, the school secretary may, after conferring with the parent, invite the student to rest in the school office for 15 to 30 minutes to determine if the symptoms will subside.  If the student is not feeling better after this time, the parents will be contacted again and will need to pick up the student.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), students must not return to the school if their fever is above 100° F, and must be fever free for 24 hours before returning to school.

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I-2.2 CONCUSSION AND HEAD INJURY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 2.0 Illness or Accident

Section 2.2 Concussion and Head Injury


Policy Statement:

Concussion and Head Injury

American Preparatory Academy has established this protocol to provide education about concussion for coaches, school personnel, parents, and students.  This protocol outlines procedures for staff to follow in identifying, treating, and appropriately referring concussed students.  School policy is specified as to return-to-activity issues following a concussion.

The school's Administrative Director shall appoint a School Concussion Specialist.  In coordination with Physical Education InstructorsSchool Secretaries, and the Administrative Director, the School Nurse shall review this protocol annually.  Any changes or modifications will be provided in writing by July 1st to the school's Administrative Director.  The Administrative Director will annually ensure that (1) the updates are included in staff policy books, written parent notification, and the school website; (2) all staff and coaches are trained in concussion identification, response procedures and return-to-activity policies; and (3) parents receive, sign and return the "Acknowledgement of Head Injury Policy" form.


Recognition of a Concussion

What is a concussion?  A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that interferes with normal function of the brain.  It occurs when the brain is rocked back and forth or twisted inside the skull as a result of a blow to the head or body.  What may appear to be only a mild jolt or blow to the head or body can result in a concussion.  A concussion can occur even if a player or student in an activity is not knocked out or loses consciousness.  (NFHS "Suggested Guidelines for Management of Concussion in Sports.")


Common signs (observed by others):

  • Student appears dazed or stunned
  • Confusion
  • Forgets plays
  • Unsure about game, score, opponent
  • Moves clumsily (altered coordination)
  • Balance problems
  • Personality change
  • Responds slowly to questions
  • Forgets events prior to hit
  • Forgets events after the hit
  • Loss of consciousness (any duration)

 

Common Symptoms (reported by student):

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Double vision, blurry vision
  • Sensitive to light or noise
  • Feels sluggish
  • Feels "foggy"
  • Problems concentrating
  • Problems remembering


RED ALERT: Any student with a witnessed trauma to the head, back or neck that causes loss of consciousness (LOC), numbness in extremities, or seizure activity.

  • Do not move the student.  Call 9-1-1 or send a student in to the main office to call 9-1-1.  Stay with the student until the School Concussion Specialist arrives.  Designated school personnel must accompany the child until relieved of custodial responsibilities by a parent.


ORANGE ALERT:  Any student who has symptoms of a concussion, and who is not stable (i.e., condition is worsening).  These may include:

  • Deterioration of neurological function
  • Decreasing level of consciousness
  • Decrease or irregularity in respirations
  • Any signs or symptoms of associated injuries, spine or skull fracture, or bleeding
  • Mental status changes: lethargy, difficulty maintaining arousal, confusion or agitation


  • Place the student in a rolling chair and carefully wheel the student to the main office.  Contact parents for immediate transportation to an emergency medical facility.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.

YELLOW ALERT:  Any student who has symptoms of a concussion, and who is stable.

  • Accompany the student to the main office.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.  Notify the parents of the injury and advise them to contact the student's primary care provider or seek care at an emergency medical facility as soon as possible and before the day's end.


BLUE ALERT: Any student with a witnessed trauma to the head but without  concussion symptoms.

  • When in doubt, sit 'em out.  Do not allow the student to participate in physical activities.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.  Inform parents of the nature and time of the event.  Students with suspected head injuries should not be permitted to drive home.


Concussion Events That Occur Off School Property (Such as Sporting Events or Field Trips)

Respond appropriately based on the above guidelines.  Seek assistance from the host site.  Ensure that other students are supervised for whom you are responsible while you attend to or accompany the injured student.  Promptly notify the school administration.


Return to Play (RTP) Procedures After a Diagnosed Concussion

  1. Return to activity and play is a medical decision. 
  2. Once expert medical clearance has been documented, school personnel will require re-evaluation if concussion symptoms are still evident and will make the final decision regarding resumption of activity.
  3. Once the above criteria are met, the School Concussion Specialist will supervise student progression back to full activity following the step-wise process detailed below. 
  4. Progression is individualized, and will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Factors that may affect the rate of progression include: previous history of concussion, duration and type of symptoms, age of the student, and sport/activity in which the student participates. An athlete/student with a prior history of concussion, one who has had an extended duration of symptoms, or one who is participating in a collision or contact sport may be progressed more slowly.
  5. The student should spend 1 to 2 days at each step before advancing to the next. If post concussion symptoms occur at any step, student must stop the activity and the treating physician must be contacted. Depending upon the specific type and severity of the symptoms, the student may be told to rest for 24 hours and then resume activity at a level one step below where he or she was at when the symptoms occurred. This resumption of activity could be considerably simplified for a student injured during recess compared to a student injured at a game or formal practice.


Step-wise Process for RTP

  1. Complete cognitive rest.  This may include staying home from school or limiting school hours (and studying) for several days.  Activities requiring concentration and attention may worsen symptoms and delay recovery.
  2. Return to school full-time.
  3. Light exercise.  This step cannot begin until the student is no longer having concussion symptoms and is cleared by a physician for further activity.  At this point the athlete may begin walking or riding an exercise bike. No weight lifting.
  4. Running in the gym or on the field.  No helmet or other equipment.
  5. Non-contact training drills in full equipment.  Weight training can begin.
  6. Full contact practice or training.
  7. Play in game.  Must be cleared by physician before returning to play.


Supplemental Materials:

Handouts:                   HO I 2.2 APA Head Injury Policy

Office Forms:             OF I-2.2 Acknowledgement of Head Injury Policy

Legal References:     Utah Code Title 26 Chapter 53 Protection of Athletes with Head Injuries Act

                                    Utah Administrative Code R277-614, Athletes and Students with Head Injuries                            


Supportive Research: SR I-2.2 Head Injury Training PowerPoint

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I-2.3 BLOOD-BORNE PATHOGENS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 2.0 Illness or Accident

Section 2.3 Blood-Borne Pathogens

  

Policy Statement:

Blood-Borne Pathogens

School staff shall maintain a worksite that is clean, sanitary and stocked with appropriate blood-borne pathogens emergency response supplies and materials.  Staff will wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at all times when blood-borne pathogens are present and will follow the policies and procedures outlined in the school's Emergency Response Plan related to school emergencies.  Post treatment actions include bandaging/cleansing the Source Individual and cleansing/changing his/her clothing.  Additionally the location where the injury occurred and the treatment area (and any area in-between when appropriate) must be cleansed with appropriate cleansing agents to eliminate entirely the risk of infection/contamination to other persons.  Caregivers must cleanse themselves and discard or cleanse PPE to eliminate entirely the risk of infection or contamination. 

Objects discarded must be either triple bagged and labeled, or bagged in bio-hazard bags available at the school office.  They must be disposed of immediately or incinerated if possible.

Blood-borne Pathogens policies and procedures shall be posted in the school office.


Exposure Control Plan

All exposure to blood or other blood borne pathogens as defined in OSHA blood borne pathogens regulations (1910.1030) require PPE as defined in section 1910.1030b.  This includes protective synthetic exam gloves, eye protection and masks and the employment of Universal Precautions as defined in section 1910.1030b.  PPE is available at the school office.  Source individuals (persons from whom the blood or pathogen originated) must be isolated from others and cleanse themselves with soap and water when appropriate.  Contaminated Sharps may not be recapped using the two-handed technique and must be disposed into the Sharps container at the school office.  Contaminated pens, pencils or other objects must be brought to the school office and discarded after they penetrate the skin of a Source Individual.   


Exposure Determination

Both instructional and administrative staff members have minimal occupational exposure risks to blood borne pathogens both in the classroom and on the playground.  Risks are not associated with specific job functions or duties as assigned but are the result of accidents or injuries sustained by Source Individuals in the regular operation of a school.  Expected risks include cuts, abrasions, bloody noses and needle sticks associated with the needs of diabetics or persons in anaphylactic shock (EPI pen).


Evaluation 

For non-routine school injuries, appropriate administrators and instructional staff will review the incident's Accident Report and determine actions to be taken to prevent future injuries of the same type.  School administrators will initiate the review.


Supportive Research: SR I-2.3 OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Info Sheet

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I-3.0 BUILDING SECURITY AND SAFETY

I-3.1 SAFETY ON SCHOOL GROUNDS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.1 Safety on School Grounds

  

Policy Statement:

Safety on School Grounds

The Board is committed to providing a nurturing, respectful educational and work environment, where the worth and dignity of individuals are valued and their safety and rights are protected. Behaviors or actions that compromise this commitment interfere with school operations or are otherwise contrary to the basic mission of APA, which is: 

To provide an orderly, safe and nurturing learning environment wherein content-rich, efficient curriculum and research-based instructional methodologies are utilized to ensure that every student achieves academic success and develops good character based on concrete measurements.

All employees of the School share responsibility for the health, safety and general welfare of students and bear a professional responsibility to monitor school safety and respond accordingly to both observed and reported safety concerns.  

It is school policy to comply with all relevant statutory and regulatory provisions and to take such additional measures as it considers necessary. To achieve this the school will, at a minimum, operate to legal requirements and established standards of good practice and will as far as is reasonably practicable.  The school will:

  1. Manage its activities in such a way as to ensure that the health, safety and welfare of all employees, students, and any other persons on its premises are not put at risk.
  2. Provide and maintain school facilities and surrounding premises that are safe and without risk to health and is adequate with regard to facilities and arrangements for the welfare at school of all students, staff and visitors.
  3. Make arrangements for ensuring safety and absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances.
  4. Provide the necessary information, instruction, training and supervision to ensure the health and safety of all employees, students and any other persons on school grounds.
  5. Maintain at all times a condition that is safe and without risk to health and provide and maintain means of safe access and egress, in accordance with applicable fire and safety codes.
  6. Promote through consultation and other means, the active involvement of all staff and students in the development, promotion, implementation and monitoring of measures provided for health, safety and welfare.
  7. Ensure that risk assessments are carried out at least monthly by staff and annually by Resource Management.
  8. Seek the advice of outside parties on health and safety matters when necessary.
  9. Investigate thoroughly all accidents and unusual occurrences affecting health and safety.
  10. Provide a set of standards and guidance to assist those responsible for the implementation of this policy.
  11. Monitor compliance with safety measures by regular inspection, monitoring and auditing.
  12. Provide adequate resources to enable the requirements of this policy to be achieved.


At School level, the responsibility for safety matters rests with the Director, CFO and Operations Manager.  This responsibility includes:

  1. Performing fire drills as required. 
  2. Not permitting any work to start unless a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks involved in the work has been carried out.
  3. Maintaining awareness within the School of relevant regulations/codes of practice.
  4. Instituting suitable (annual) inspection, monitoring and reporting procedures to ensure the requirements of all applicable fire codes are being met.

 

Supplemental Materials: OF I-3.1 Open Gym and Medical Release

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I-3.2 LOCKED DOORS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.2 Locked Doors


Policy Statement:

Outside Doors

  1. Main entrance doors will be unlocked by 7:50 a.m. each day for student arrival. 
  2. To ensure the safety of all building occupants ONLY the main entry doors should be used for visitor access and all visitors must sign in with the school secretary.  All other doors must remain closed and locked at all times.  All other doors remain locked throughout the school day.
  3. Never leave an unattended door propped open or allow a locked door to be opened for a visitor.  Instead, instruct them by redirecting them to the secretary through the main entrance.  Visitors are any non-student or non-staff member.
  4. Staff should always carry their key card allowing them appropriate access through locked doors.
  5. Students may not let visitors into any door of the school except through the main entrance. 


Interior Doors

  1. Classrooms should remain locked when they are vacant, except during fire drills (or actual fires) when doors will be shut and unlocked.
  2. Teachers and Instructors should carry their keys so they can easily unlock doors when needed and resist leaving doors unlocked. 
  3. The workroom door should remain closed during the day and locked after 3:30 p.m. Due to the dangerous tools in the workroom (such as cutting boards) students are not allowed in the workroom
  4. Administration and other staff shall ensure that office doors and rooms or cabinets containing confidential school records (see the Records Management Policy) are never left open or unsecure.  In no case shall office or cabinet doors containing confidential school records be left open or unattended.

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I-3.3 FIRE AND ELECTRIC

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.3 Fire and Electric


Policy Statement:

Space heaters- Space heaters in general are strongly discouraged from use at American Prep.  If there is a specific need for a heater (as approved by administration), the modern style with timers, ceramic heating elements and anti-tipping devices are required.  Space heaters that use the older technologies are not to be used.  Our insurance company (State of Utah Division of Risk Management) lists them as, "not approved."  Space heaters may not be purchased by staff or brought in from home unless the device (and the use of the device) is approved by administration. 


Candles- Our insurance policy and school policy strictly prohibit open flames of any kind inside or near the school building, "...open flames, candles, and burning incense are prohibited in state facilities."  This includes matches, lighters, candles, science experiments, burners or any other item that causes or uses an open flame.   

Candle warmers and other aroma diffusers- Candle warmers and other aroma devices may not be used in school facilities.   

Personal coffee pots and mug warmers- The school has provided a coffee pot in the staff lunchroom. Personal heating devices of any kind or size are not authorized in all other areas of the school.     

Extension cords and holiday lights- 2-pronged extension cords may not be used in the school.  Fire code requires the use of 3-pronged (grounded) extension cords.  Electronic devices (like radios, etc.) may have factory installed 2-pronged power cords, but must be plugged into 3-pronged outlets.  Stringed holiday lights are not authorized as they significantly raise the risk of a fire at the school.

Burned out light bulbs- To increase safety after hours, staff members must inform the Operations staff when burned out light bulbs are discovered on campus.


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I-3.4 ICE AND SNOW

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.4 Ice and Snow

  

Policy Statement:

Ice and snow- The school shall provide large lidded containers at each exit containing ice melt. School staff shall monitor the pavement regularly for icy areas frequently during wet weather.  Staff members must notify the Operations staff (or the school office) if an unsafe winter situation on the playground or parking lot(s) is discovered.  All staff members may open the salt container and spread ice melt on the icy area; however, the responsibility ultimately lies with Operations staff, including custodians.  Because the brown platforms on the play equipment are extremely slippery when wet and frozen. the school may need to close and rope off the playground equipment due to ice, snow and/or other temperature-related conditions.

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I-3.5 SAFE SCHOOLS POLICY - WEAPONS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.5 Safe Schools Policy - Weapons


Policy Statement:

Safe Schools Policy- Weapons

It is the policy of the American Preparatory Academy (the school) to make reasonable effort to provide a safe and nurturing learning and work environment.  The school prohibits violence on school property, at events associated with the school, or within the control of school personnel.   All persons are prohibited from unlawfully bringing ammunition, weapons and dangerous weapons, as defined by law, onto school property or at events associated with the school as outlined in the school's Student Handbook.  Employees, volunteers, contractors, invited guests, visitors and others are prohibited from unlawfully storing, possessing or using weapons or dangerous weapons on school grounds or at events associated with the school.  All persons are responsible to ensure that any item they possess is not a weapon or dangerous weapon, for which possession is prohibited by statute or this policy. 


Possession of Dangerous Weapon Outside the Scope of Employment

Individuals who possess dangerous weapons, as defined by law, on school property or at an event associated with the school, or within the control of school personnel, whether or not the dangerous weapon is allowed by law, do so in their own individual capacities and not as school employees or volunteers.  Any use of a dangerous weapon by an individual on school property or at an event associated with the school, or within the control of school personnel, is outside the scope of their employment or volunteering activities and is contrary to the purpose of employment or volunteering activities at the school. 

Individuals who are not peace officers who possess a dangerous weapon lawfully on school grounds must act in a manner that promotes the safety of themselves and others, including concealed possession of the dangerous weapon on the body of the person.  Dangerous weapons or ammunition stored in other areas, including desks, bags, purses or any other area is prohibited.  Individuals are prohibited from brandishing or "showing" a dangerous weapon to other persons, including students on school grounds, whether the dangerous weapon is loaded or unloaded.     


Firearm Safety Training on School Premises

American Prep does not provide for firearm safety training to occur on school property until such time as a district policy may be developed in accordance with Section 53A-13-106 and Rule 277-611(B).


Definitions

Violence- includes a threat of or the actual act of: pushing, shoving, assault, physical harassment, intimidation or coercion, brandishing of weapons or dangerous weapons or other behavior deemed violent by school administrators. 

School Property- includes all school owned or leased buildings, land or other real property and property contents, including the vehicles of private persons when such vehicles are on school property, as defined above, or while used for the purpose of transporting individuals to events associated with the school, or within the control of school personnel, for the duration of the event, including travel.

Dangerous Weapon- includes all items as defined in Utah Code, Title 76, Utah Criminal Code.   Dangerous weapons include, but are not limited to handguns, rifles, shotguns or other firearms, knives, explosives, incendiary devices, any and all items used to commit acts of violence, and any and all items defined by statute or local ordinance as dangerous weapons, including replica, facsimile, and/or "look alike" weapons.  Dangerous weapons, historical or antique weapons, or other weapons may not be brought onto school property for demonstration purposes.

Ammunition- includes, but is not limited to, live bullets, bb's, pellets, incendiary devices and explosives of any kind, gunpowder, including any item with gunpowder as a part or component, fireworks, firework components, rocket engines, matches, lighters, fuel of any kind, arrows, sling shots or shot material, darts, and any and all other objects deemed ammunition by school administration.

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I-3.6 CHEMICALS AND TOXIC MATERIALS*

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 3.0 Building Security and Safety

Section 3.6 Chemicals and Toxic Materials

  

Policy Statement:

You may contact the school if you have questions or concerns regarding building safety.  A copy of our school's Management Plan is available upon request.

 

Pesticide Use on School Grounds

The school will minimize the use of pesticides, particularly on the interior of the facility, by using Integrated Pest Management (IPM) techniques.  A record will be maintained at the school office of pesticide use by third party contractors as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the chemicals applied on the premises.


Asbestos

In 1986 Congress passed the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA). This law required

all schools K-12 to be inspected for asbestos containing building materials (ACBM).  The law further requires an asbestos management plan to be in place by July 1989.  The facilities of the American Preparatory Academy do not have any asbestos products used in their planning or construction; therefore, no operations and maintenance programs or future inspections are required.


Cleansers


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I-4.0 PRIVACY AND SCHOOL SAFETY

I-4.1 SECURITY CAMERAS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.1 Security Cameras


Policy Statement:

Security Cameras

In order to increase security for our students and staff, and to facilitate staff development activities, security cameras may be present in classrooms throughout the school recording both audio and video. 

Staff members sign the "Staff Acceptance Statements" and parents sign the "Acceptance of Policy" statement recognizing that there is no expectation of privacy on any APA property.

School Video Surveillance

  1. We need to designate a department, individuals, etc. in the district/school to be the "law enforcement unit" because "Law enforcement records are excluded from FERPA, and they can be disclosed to anyone, including law enforcement agencies, without consent by parents." This helps protect us if we do share videos with law enforcement agencies, etc.
  2. Identify the "law enforcement unit," including names, in the annual FERPA notification of rights.  (Further protection.)
  3. Despite these precautions, NEVER share video with students or parents without clear and specific written authorization from EVERY parent AND executive approval (Carolyn/Laura). We will open ourselves to a FERPA lawsuit if we do.  Law enforcement agencies are another matter, but we need to be careful—The policy should probably be under executive approval (Carolyn/Laura).  If we have a 3rd party (say the company that services the surveillance equipment) that may access the video, we should develop a policy for them as well.
  4. Also, do not release (different from share) the video to school staff not designated as "law enforcement officials" because then the school is maintaining it and it becomes an "educational record."  Educational records are subject to FERPA and other laws that we do not want to tangle with.  (See Legal Notes August 2012)


Policy Cross-references: C-1.1 Staff Acceptance Statements 

     E-2.3 Acceptance of Policy

Supportive Research:      

Interoffice Memo from South Summit District

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I-4.2 STUDENT PRIVACY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.2 Student Privacy 


Policy Statement:

Under FERPA, the Family Education Rights Privacy Act, educational institutions may release "directory" information to anyone, including but not limited to colleges and universities, the media, and scholarship grantors, unless you specify that you do not want the information released. APA and APEF (American Preparatory Education Foundation) have designated the following as directory information:

• Student's name

• Participation in officially recognized activities and sports

• Address

• Telephone listing

• Electronic mail address

• Photographs and video

• Degrees, honors and awards received

• Dates of attendance

• Grade level


The primary purpose of directory information is to allow American Prep to include this type of information from students' education records in certain school publications. Examples include:

• Honor roll or other recognition lists

• APA Family Directory

• The annual yearbook

• A theater playbill

• Sports activity sheets


Office Form: OF I-4.2 FERPA

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I-4.3 ACCIDENT REPORTS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.3 Accident Reports


Policy Statement:

Accident Reports

If a student is injured in an accident or under any circumstances, the staff should bring the student to the school office and explain what happened to cause the injury.  The school office personnel will initiate first aid and assess the severity of the injury, and will call the parents of the student if necessary.

Accidents and injuries must be documented using Accident Reports, Student Injury Reports or other applicable reports.  Persons involved in the event and/or witnesses must complete appropriate reports immediately, or as soon as is reasonably appropriate, but not less than 24 hours from the time of the accident or injury. 


Staff or Visitor Injury or Job-related Illness Reports

A.        If it is serious, report within 8 hours:

"Section §34A-6-301(3)(b)(ii) states that each employer shall, within 8 hours of occurrence, notify the Division of Occupational Safety and Health, at (801) 530-6901 or (800) 530-5090, of any; work related fatality; disabling, serious, or significant injury; or occupational disease incident. A serious injury includes; amputation, fractures of major bones (both simple and compound), and hospitalization for medical treatment."


B.        If it is less serious, report within 7 days:

"Each employer shall file the report within seven days after the occurrence, or the employee's notification of the same, which results in medical treatment by a physician, loss of consciousness, loss of work, restriction of work, or transfer to another job." 


C.        Additionally:

"Each employer shall file a subsequent report with the commission of any previously reported injury; or occupational disease that later resulted in death."

If it is not serious and does not result in medical treatment by a physician, loss of consciousness, loss of work, restriction of work, or job transfer, then it does not need to be reported.

  

Supplemental Materials: OF I-4.3 UTLaborCommissionForm122.pdf


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I-4.4 SCHOOL SAFETY VIOLATIONS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.4 School Safety Violations


Policy Statement:

School Safety Violations

As a public school, American Prep is required to report all incidents that qualify under the Safe Schools Violation Report.  If a staff member is a witness to a safe school violation, it should be reported immediately to school administration.  Included in safety violations:  possession of weapon, knife, lighters, controlled substances, razor blades, matches.  In addition, physical assault including hitting, kicking, biting are violations.  If a student requires medical attention due to an accident, such as stitches, a broken bone, concussion, or anything that requires a doctor's attention, must also be reported so that it can be recorded.

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I-4.5 SEARCHES AND SEIZURES

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.5 Searches and Seizures


Policy Statement:

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." 4th Amendment 

If a student consents to a search, there are no 4th Amendment issues involved.  Consent must be age-appropriate and not coerced.

Administrators are charged with determining the urgency of the situation and the safety of all students at the school when considering searches. 

Reasonableness: Both suspicion for the search and the appropriateness of the scope of the search must be reasonable.  Suspicion and Reasonableness shall be determined by a School Administrator.


  1. Reasonable Suspicion: The school official must have reasonable grounds for expecting that the search may turn up evidence that the student has violated the law or rules of the school.
    Examples of Reasonably Suspicious Circumstances:
    • Bulging pockets
    • Stoned look, flushed face, glassy and red and bloodshot eyes
    • Smell of marijuana and was incoherent
    • Nervous, fidgety behavior, furtive gestures, "obvious consciousness of guilt"
    • A student fails to consent to search after other class members give consent
    • A known-drug experimenter refuses to give principal his coat
    • Evasive statements, profane language and supplying false names
    • Record of concealed weapons plus suspicious behavior
    • History, suspicion, or appearance of drug use
    • Student out of class and in a prohibited area w/o a pass
    • Student in an immediate vicinity of an incident together w/ a suspicious reaction when questioned
    • Observation of drug activity
    • Drug paraphernalia seen through car window of student's car
    • Observation of a request to sell drugs or of several pill sales
    • Overhearing student's conversation about drinking beer at school
    • Admission by a student that he had illegal items in his backpack
    • Student threats of crime or violence
    • Information from reliable student informants
  2. Appropriateness of Scope: The breadth of the search should be reasonable related to the objectives of the search. 
    Body Searches: Unless a weapon is suspected, the student should first be given the opportunity to turn out pockets and otherwise surrender evidence voluntarily.  Two school personnel, including a school administrator, should be present for body searches.
    • Parents must be notified that a body search has taken or will take place
    • Pat-downs are a comparatively slight invasion of privacy.
  3. Who Can Search?:
    • Two school personnel, including a school administrator, should be present for body searches.
    • Drug-sniffing dogs may conduct generalized searches of lockers, motor vehicles, backpacks, and personal items.  For a student search using a drug-sniffing dog, an Executive Level administrator must be notified prior to the search.
    • Video and audio surveillance is publicized on the campus.  Parents, staff, and students have no expectation of privacy regarding activities on school property outside of bathrooms or locker rooms.
  4. What Can Be Searched?:
    • Lockers (school property)
    • Motor vehicles if on school property and based on reasonable suspicion
    • Urinalysis or Drug Tests
      • if reasonable suspicion exists or
      • of students participating in school athletics or extracurricular activities
    • Personal belongings, including purses, backpacks, bags, electronic devices
    • Body searches based on reasonable suspicion and appropriateness of scope as described above.
  5. Search Procedure
    • Establish reasonably suspicious circumstances
    • Notify a second school employee, preferably another administrator but not required
    • Question student, and ask for consent to search, outlining the scope of the search
    • Conduct search
    • If a body search is required beyond emptying pockets, notify parent before or after the search
    • Document in writing the above, including the outcome of the search


Policy Cross-References:    H-5.1 JH/HS Discipline Procedures

                                                I-4.6 Student Questioning


Legal References: UT R277-615 "Standards and Procedures for Student Searches"


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I-4.6 STUDENT QUESTIONING

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.6 Student Questioning


Policy Statement:

School officials have broad authority to question students—with or without cause—in the interest of school safety.

Law enforcement personnel must read a student his/her Miranda rights before questioning.  Parents must be notified.


Policy Cross-References:    H-5.1 JH/HS Discipline Procedures

                                                I-4.4 Searches and Seizures

                                                I-4.5 Searches and Seizures


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I-4.7 DATA GOVERNANCE POLICY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.7 Data Governance Policy


1 PURPOSE

Data governance is an organizational approach to data and information management that is formalized as a set of policies and procedures that encompass the full life cycle of data; from acquisition, to use, to disposal. American Preparatory Academy takes seriously its moral and legal responsibility to protect student privacy and ensure data security. Utah’s Student Data Protection Act (SDPA), U.C.A §53A-1-1401 requires that American Preparatory Academy adopt a Data Governance Plan.

2 SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY

This policy is applicable to all employees, temporary employees, and contractors. The policy must be used to assess agreements made to disclose data to third-parties. In accordance with agency policy and procedures, this policy will be reviewed and adjusted on an annual basis or more frequently, as needed. This policy is designed to ensure only authorized disclosure of confidential information. The following subsections provide data governance policies and processes for American Preparatory Academy:

1. Data Advisory Committee

2. Non-Disclosure Assurances

3. Data Security and Privacy Training for Employees

4. Data Disclosure

5. Data Sharing

6. Data Breach

7. Record Retention and Expungement

8. Data Quality

Furthermore, this American Preparatory Academy Data Governance Plan works in conjunction with the Technology Security Policy, which:
● Designates American Preparatory Academy as the steward for all confidential information maintained within American Preparatory Academy.
● Designates Data Stewards access for all confidential information.
● Requires Data Stewards to maintain a record of all confidential information that they are responsible for.
● Requires Data Stewards to manage confidential information according to this policy and all other applicable policies, standards and plans.
● Complies with all legal, regulatory, and contractual obligations regarding privacy of Agency data. Where such requirements exceed the specific stipulation of this policy, the legal, regulatory, or contractual obligation shall take precedence.
● Provides the authority to design, implement, and maintain privacy procedures meeting American Preparatory Academy standards concerning the privacy of data in motion, at rest and processed by related information systems.
● Ensures that all American Preparatory Academy’s board members, employees, contractors, and volunteers comply with the policy and undergo annual privacy training.
● Provides policies and process for

  • Systems administration,
  • Network security,
  • Application security,
  • Endpoint, server, and device Security
  • Identity, authentication, and access management,
  • Data protection and cryptography
  • Monitoring, vulnerability, and patch management
  • High availability, disaster recovery, and physical protection
  • Incident Responses
  • Acquisition and asset management, and
  • Policy, audit, e-discovery, and training.

3 DATA SECURITY COMMITTEE

3.1 Structure
The Data Security Committee develops procedures and guidelines concerning the collection, storage, and use and safekeeping of data by the school and its staff. The committee is also responsible to update as necessary this policy, and to direct the responsive actions in the event of any material violation of this policy or any Security Breach.

The Data Security Committee shall from time to time consult with Data Steward to review the implementation and compliance with this policy.

The Data Security Committee is led by the District Technology Director. The District Technology Director monitors internet use for potentially malicious traffic, security logs of network security gateways and advises the Data Security Committee on these matters.

The Data Security Committee shall periodically review identifiable risks to the security, confidentiality, and integrity of data, and shall review this policy at least annually to assess its effectiveness and determine whether any changes are warranted by legislation or regulation. Training resources will also be adjusted to keep up to date with policy changes and best practices in data security.
The Data Security Committee is comprised of the following:
● Student Data Manager and District IT Director
● District Records Management Officer
● Data Stewards
● A Member of the Governing Board
● Policy Facilitators


3.2 Individual and Group Responsibilities
The following table outlines the responsibilities of members of the Data Advisory Committee and other staff members.

Role Responsibilities

Student Data Manager


  • authorize and manage the sharing, outside of the student data manager's education entity, of personally identifiable student data for the education entity as described in this section
  • provide for necessary technical assistance, training, and support
  • act as the primary local point of contact for the state student data officer
  • ensure that the following notices are available to parents:

District IT Director

1. Ensures compliance with security systems laws throughout the public education system, including:

  • Oversee adoption of the CIS controls
  • Provide for necessary technical assistance, training, and support as it relates to IT security
  • producing resource materials, model plans, and model forms for LEA systems security;
  •  Investigates complaints of alleged violations of systems breaches.


District Records Management Officer (RMO)

1. With assistance from the Enrollment/Assessment Director, RMO responsible for the collection, maintenance, and transmittal of student enrollment verification data, general assessment data, and other confidential student information.
2. The RMO is required to be state certified in records management.
3. Provides adequate training to school secretaries, administrators, and other staff in appropriate and acceptable records security processes.

Data Stewards  (one per campus)

1. Perform formal and informal campus audits and provide results to the Student Data Manager and District IT Director.
2. Work directly with other School Directors, the Student Data Manager, and the District IT Director to communicate this policy and monitor the security of data.
Policy Facilitator 1. Maintains Data Governance Policy and Technology Security Policy.
2. Creates and maintains the Data Privacy training module.
3. Provides Student Data Privacy Training to general staff.
4. Attends conferences, trainings, and webinars provided by the state regarding student data privacy. Information gathered from these meetings are shared with the Data Advisory Committee and implemented in American Preparatory Academy’s policies.


4 EMPLOYEE NON-DISCLOSURE ASSURANCES

Employee non-disclosure assurances are intended to minimize the risk of human error and misuse of information.

4.1 Scope
All American Preparatory Academy board members, employees, contractors and volunteers must sign and obey the American Preparatory Academy Employee Non-Disclosure Agreement, which describes the permissible uses of state technology and information.


4.2 Non-Compliance
Non-compliance with the agreements may result in consequences up to and including removal of access to American Preparatory Academy’s network; if this access is required for employment, employees and contractors may be subject to dismissal.


4.3 Non-Disclosure Assurances
All student data utilized by American Preparatory Academy is protected as defined by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and Utah statute. This policy outlines the way American Preparatory Academy staff is to utilize data and protect personally identifiable and confidential information. A signed agreement form is required from all American Preparatory Academy staff to verify agreement to adhere to/abide by these practices and will be maintained in American Preparatory Academy Human Resources. All American Preparatory Academy’s employees will:
1. Complete a Security and Privacy Training.
2. Consult with American Preparatory Academy’s Compliance Team when creating or disseminating reports to external entities containing data.
3. Use password-protected LEA-authorized computers when accessing any student-level or staff-level records.
4. NOT share individual passwords for personal computers or data systems with anyone.
5. Log out of any data system/portal and close the browser after each use.
6. Store sensitive data on appropriate-secured location. Unsecured access and flash drives, DVD, CD-ROM or other removable media, or personally owned computers or devices are not deemed appropriate for storage of sensitive, confidential or student data.
7. Keep printed reports with personally identifiable information in a locked location while unattended and use the secure document destruction service provided at American Preparatory Academy when disposing of such records.
8. NOT share personally identifying data during public presentations, webinars, etc. If users need to demonstrate student/staff level data, demo records should be used for such presentations.
9. Redact any personally identifiable information when sharing sample reports with general audiences, in accordance with guidance provided by the student data manager, found in Appendix B (Protecting PII in Public Reporting).
10. Delete files containing sensitive data after using them on computers or move them to secured servers or personal folders accessible only by authorized parties.
11. Password protect any e-mail attachments containing student PII or data.
12. NOT transmit student/staff-level data externally unless reviewed and approved by American Preparatory Compliance Team and then only transmit data via secure methods.
13. Limit use of individual data to the purposes which have been authorized within the scope of job responsibilities.

4.4 Data Security and Privacy Training
4.4.1 Purpose

American Preparatory Academy recognizes that training and supporting educators and staff regarding federal and state data privacy laws is a necessary control to ensure legal compliance.

American Preparatory Academy will provide a range of training opportunities for all American Preparatory Academy staff and temporary employees with access to student educational data or confidential educator records in order to minimize the risk of human error and misuse of information.

4.4.2 Policy
Within the first week of employment, all American Preparatory Academy’s employees must sign and follow the American Preparatory Academy’s Employee Acceptable Use Policy, which describes the permissible uses of school technology and information.

New employees that do not comply may not be able to use American Preparatory Academy’s networks or technology. Within the first week of employment, all American Preparatory Academy’s employees also must sign and obey the American Preparatory Academy Employee Non-Disclosure Agreement, which describes appropriate uses and the safeguarding of student and educator data.

All current American Preparatory Academy employees are required to complete the Security Data Privacy self-study module and assessment annually. Participation in the training as well as a signed copy of the Employee Non-Disclosure Agreement will be annually monitored by supervisors. Supervisors will annually report all American Preparatory Academy’s employees who do not have these requirements completed to the IT Security Manager.

4.4.3 Procedure

The data manager will ensure that educators who have access to student records will receive an annual training on confidentiality of student data to all employees with access to student data. The content of this training will be based on the Data Sharing Policy.

By October 1 each year, the data manager will report to USBE the completion status of the annual confidentiality training and provide a copy of the training materials used.

The data manager shall keep a list of all employees who are authorized to access student education records after having completed a training that meets the requirements of 53E-9-204.


5 DATA DISCLOSURE
5.1 Purpose
Providing data to persons and entities outside of the American Preparatory Academy increases transparency, promotes education in American Preparatory Academy, and increases knowledge about Utah public education. This policy establishes the protocols and procedures for sharing data maintained by American Preparatory Academy. It is intended to be consistent with the disclosure provisions of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 U.S.C. 1232g, 34 CFR Part 99 and Utah’s Student Data Protection Act (SDPA), U.C.A §53A-1-1401.


5.2 Policy for disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information (PII)
5.2.1 Student or Student’s Parent/Guardian Access
In accordance with FERPA regulations 20 U.S.C. § 1232g (a)(1) (A) (B) (C) and (D), American Preparatory Academy will provide parents with access to their student’s education records, or an eligible student access to his or her own education records, within 45 days of receiving a written request. American Preparatory Academy is not required to provide data that it does not maintain, nor is American Preparatory Academy required to create education records in response to an eligible student's request.


5.2.2 Third Party Vendor
Third party vendors may have access to students’ personally identifiable information if the vendor is designated as a “school official” as defined in FERPA, 34 CFR §§ 99.31(a)(1) and 99.7(a)(3)(iii). A school official may include parties such as: professors, instructors, administrators, health staff, counselors, attorneys, clerical staff, trustees, members of committees and disciplinary boards, and a contractor, consultant, volunteer or other party to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions.

All third-party vendors contracting with American Preparatory Academy must be compliant with Utah’s Student Data Protection Act (SDPA), U.C.A §53E-9-300. Vendors determined not to be compliant may not be allowed to enter into future contracts with American Preparatory Academy without third-party verification that they are compliant with federal and state law and board rule.


5.2.3 Internal Partner Requests
Internal partners to American Preparatory Academy include LEA and school officials that are determined to have a legitimate educational interest in the information.


5.2.4 Governmental Agency Requests
American Preparatory Academy may not disclose personally identifiable information of students to external persons or organizations to conduct research or evaluation that is not directly related to a state or federal program reporting requirement, audit, or evaluation. In order to satisfy FERPA disclosure exceptions to data without consent, the government agency must provide evidence demonstrating that the request is made in the case of a federal or state:
a) reporting requirement
b) audit
c) evaluation

5.3 Policy for External disclosure of Non-Personally Identifiable Information (PII)
5.3.1 Scope
External data requests from individuals or organizations that are not intending on conducting external research or are not fulfilling a state or federal reporting requirement, audit, or evaluation.


5.3.2 Student Data Disclosure Risk Levels
American Preparatory Academy has determined three levels of data requests with corresponding policies and procedures for appropriately protecting data based on risk: Low, Medium, and High. The Student Data Manager will make final determinations on classification of student data requests.


5.3.2.1 Low-Risk Data Request
Definition: High-level aggregate data
Examples:
● Graduation rate by year for low student count
● Percent of third-graders scoring proficient on the SAGE ELA assessment

5.3.2.2 Medium-Risk Data Request
Definition: Aggregate data, but because of potentially low n-sizes, the data must have disclosure avoidance methods applied.
Examples:
● Graduation rate for small graduating class
● Percent of third-graders scoring proficient on the SAGE ELA assessment by classroom and demographic
● Child Nutrition Program Free or Reduced Lunch percentages by classroom


5.3.2.3 High-Risk Data Request
Definition: Student-level data that are de-identified.
Examples:
● De-identified student-level graduation data
● De-identified student-level SAGE ELA assessment scores for grades 3-6.
5.4 Process
All external data requests (low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk) are processed through the Student Data Manager, under American Preparatory Academy’s Compliance Team. The Student Data Manager will determine whether to grant or deny access to the requested data and ensure the proper protocol or procedure for sharing the requested data is followed. Appeals may be made to the Compliance Director.


5.5 Data Disclosure to a Requesting External Researcher or Evaluator
Responsibility: The Student Data Manager will ensure the proper data are shared with external researcher or evaluator to comply with federal, state, and board rules.
American Preparatory Academy may not disclose personally identifiable information of students to external persons or organizations to conduct research or evaluation that is not directly related to a state or federal program audit or evaluation. Data that does not disclose PII may be shared with external researcher or evaluators for projects unrelated to federal or state requirements if:

1. An American Preparatory Academy Director or board member sponsors an external researcher or evaluator request.
2. Student data are not PII and are de-identified through disclosure avoidance techniques and other pertinent techniques as determined by the Student Data Management.
3. Researchers and evaluators supply American Preparatory Academy a copy of any publication or presentation that uses American Preparatory Academy’s data 10 business days prior to any publication or presentation.

6 DATA SHARING

There is a risk of re-disclosure whenever student data are shared. American Preparatory Academy shall follow appropriate controls to mitigate the risk of re-disclosure and to ensure compliance with federal and state law.

6.1 Procedure
1. The data manager shall approve all data sharing or designate other individuals who have been trained on compliance requirements with FERPA.

a. Teachers must contact the Data Manager and IT Security Officer to request to use educational apps or websites before use in the classroom in order to minimize the risk of student data misuse.

b. APA may enter into a Data Privacy Agreement with third-party entities before use to ensure the proper protections for Student Data.

2. For external research, the data manager shall ensure that the study follows the requirements of FERPA’s study exception described in 34 CFR 99.31(a)(6).
3. After sharing from student records, the data manager shall ensure that an entry is made in the LEA Metadata Dictionary to record that the exchange happened.
4. After sharing from student records, the data manager shall make a note in the student record of the exchange in accordance with 34 CFR 99.32.

7 DATA BREACH


7.1 Purpose
Establishing a plan for responding to a data breach, complete with clearly defined roles and responsibilities, will promote better response coordination and help educational organizations shorten their incident response time. Prompt response is essential for minimizing the risk of any further data loss and, therefore, plays an important role in mitigating any negative consequences of the breach, including potential harm to affected individuals.


7.2 Policy
School Data Privacy Officers must report any known Security Breach or any incident that is likely to cause a Security Breach. These incidents include thefts of computer devices, viruses, worms, or computer “attacks” that may lead to unauthorized access to confidential information. Breaches also include improper communication of protected information by staff or students.

Systemic breaches should be reported to the IT staff immediately. These staff will investigate the issue and together with the Technology Director resolve the issue. Issues of Data Security will be considered of the highest priority. The breach and solution will be logged and reported to the Data Security Committee for review.

Personnel breaches involve improper handling of confidential or internal data. These breaches will be corrected by the School Data Privacy Officer. The extent of the breach must be determined, and all steps must be taken to reverse or contain the breach. The parents or guardians of a student will be notified if there is an unauthorized public release of a student’s personally identifiable data due to a security breach. A report will be submitted to the Data Security Committee for review. The Data Security Committee will watch for trends in policy oversight or lapses and take appropriate action.

Remedies of members of the Data Security Committee may include:
1. Additional training
2. Policy and/or procedural changes
3. Technological safeguards
4. Employee discipline


8 RECORD RETENTION AND EXPUNGEMENT

8.1 Purpose
The LEA recognizes the risk associated with data following a student year after year that could be used to mistreat the student.  APA shall review all requests for records expungement from parents and make a determination based on the following procedure

8.2 Policy

The following records may not be expunged: grades, transcripts, a record of the student’s enrollment, assessment information.

The procedure for expungement shall match the record amendment procedure found in 34 CFR 99, Subpart C of FERPA.

  1. If a parent believes that a record is misleading, inaccurate, or in violation of the student’s privacy, they may request that the record be expunged.
  2. APA shall decide whether to expunge the data within a reasonable time after the request.
  3. If APA decides not to expunge the record, they will inform the parent of their decision as well as the right to an appeal hearing.
  4. APA shall hold the hearing within a reasonable time after receiving the request for a hearing.
  5. APA shall provide the parent notice of the date, time, and place in advance of the hearing.
  6. The hearing shall be conducted by any individual that does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing.
  7. The APA shall give the parent a full and fair opportunity to present relevant evidence. At the parents’ expense and choice, they may be represented by an individual of their choice, including an attorney.
  8. APA shall make its decision in writing within a reasonable time following the hearing.
  9. The decision must be based exclusively on evidence presented at the hearing and include a summary of the evidence and reasons for the decision.
  10. If the decision is to expunge the record, the LEA will seal it or make it otherwise unavailable to other staff and educators.

9 QUALITY ASSURANCES AND TRANSPARENCY REQUIREMENTS
9.1 Purpose
Data quality is achieved when information is valid for the use to which it is applied, is consistent with other reported data and users of the data have confidence in and rely upon it. Good data quality does not solely exist with the data itself, but is also a function of appropriate data interpretation and use and the perceived quality of the data. Thus, true data quality involves not just those auditing, cleaning and reporting the data, but also data consumers. Data quality is addressed in five areas:


9.1.1 Data Governance Structure
American Preparatory Academy’s data governance policy is structured to encourage the effective and appropriate use of educational data. American Preparatory Academy’s data governance structure centers on the idea that data is the responsibility of all and that data driven decision making is the goal of all data collection, storage, reporting and analysis. Data driven decision making guides what data is collected, reported, and analyzed.


9.1.2 Data Requirements and Definitions
Clear and consistent data requirements and definitions are necessary for good data quality. On the data collection side, the Student Data Manager communicates data requirements and definitions through Data Steward List and annual training. The IT Director communicates with LEA IT staff regularly at annual trainings.


9.1.3 Data Collection
Data elements should be collected only once. Where possible, data is collected at the lowest level available (i.e. at the student/teacher level). Thus, there are no aggregate data collections if the aggregate data can be derived or calculated from the detailed data.
For all new data collections, American Preparatory Academy provides clear guidelines for data collection and the purpose of the data request. American Preparatory Academy also notifies stakeholders as soon as possible about future data collections.


9.1.4 Data Auditing
American Preparatory Academy will utilize appropriate external security audits and stay in compliance with all state requirements regarding network connectivity and data security. The Data Security Committee will review any breaches or findings by external auditors and they will be resolved in the same fashion as internally discovered breaches. Guidelines and suggestions provided by the external audit will be reviewed and adopted as necessary by the Data Security Committee.

10 Data Transparency
American Preparatory will maintain entries in the Metadata Dictionary as described in Utah’s Student Data Protection Act (SDPA), U.C.A §53E-9-301.

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I-4.8 TECHNOLOGY SECURITY POLICY

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.8 Technology Security Policy


Policy Statement:

1. Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to ensure the secure use and handling of all district data, computer systems and computer equipment by District students, patrons, and employees.


2. Policy

2.1 Technology Security                                                                                               

It is the policy of American Preparatory Academy to support secure network systems in the district, including security for all personally identifiable information that is stored on paper or stored digitally on district-maintained computers and networks. This policy supports efforts to mitigate threats that may cause harm to the district, its students, or its employees.

The district will ensure reasonable efforts will be made to maintain network security. Data loss can be caused by human error, hardware malfunction, natural disaster, security breach, etc., and may not be preventable.

All persons who are granted access to the district network and other technology resources are expected to be careful and aware of suspicious communications and unauthorized use of district devices and the network. When an employee or other user becomes aware of suspicious activity, he/she is to immediately contact the district’s Information Security Officer with the relevant information.

This policy and procedure also covers third party vendors/contractors that contain or have access to American Preparatory Academy critically sensitive data. All third party entities will be required to sign the Restriction on Use of Confidential Information Agreement before accessing our systems or receiving information. 

It is the policy of American Preparatory Academy to fully conform with all federal and state privacy and data governance laws.  Including the Family Educational Rights and privacy Act, 20 U.S. Code §1232g and 34 CFR Part 99 (hereinafter “FERPA”), the Government Records and Management Act  U.C.A. §62G-2 (hereinafter “GRAMA”), U.C.A. §53A-1-1401 et seq and Utah Administrative Code R277-487.

Professional development for staff regarding the importance of network security and best practices are included in the procedures. The procedures associated with this policy are consistent with guidelines provided by cyber security professionals worldwide and in accordance with guidelines published by the Utah State Office of Education. American Preparatory Academy supports the development, implementation and ongoing improvements for a robust security system of hardware and software that is designed to protect American Preparatory Academy’s data, users, and electronic assets.


3. Procedure

3.1. Definitions:

3.1.1.  Access: Directly or indirectly use, attempt to use, instruct, communicate with, cause input to, cause output from, or otherwise make use of any resources of a computer, computer system, computer network, or any means of communication with any of them.

3.1.2. Authorization: Having the express or implied consent or permission of the owner, or of the person authorized by the owner to give consent or permission to access a computer, computer system, or computer network in a manner not exceeding the consent or permission.

3.1.3. Computer: Any electronic device or communication facility that stores, retrieves, processes, or transmits data.

3.1.4. Computer system: A set of related, connected or unconnected, devices, software, or other related computer equipment.

3.1.5. Computer network: The interconnection of communication or telecommunication lines between: computers; or computers and remote terminals; or the interconnection by wireless technology between: computers; or computers and remote terminals.

3.1.6. Computer property: Includes electronic impulses, electronically produced data, information, financial instruments, software, or programs, in either machine or human readable form, any other tangible or intangible item relating to a computer, computer system, computer network, and copies of any of them.

3.1.7. Confidential: Data, text, or computer property that is protected by a security system that clearly evidences that the owner or custodian intends that it not be available to others without the owner's or custodian's permission.

3.1.8. Encryption or encrypted data  – To read an encrypted file, you must have access to a secret key or password that enables you to decrypt it.

3.1.9. Personally Identifiable Information (PII) - Any data that could potentially identify a specific individual. Any information that can be used to distinguish one person from another and can be used for de-anonymizing anonymous data can be considered Protected data

3.1.10. Security system: A computer, computer system, network, or computer property that has some form of access control technology implemented, such as encryption, password protection, other forced authentication, or access control designed to keep out unauthorized persons.

3.1.11. Sensitive data - Data that contains personally identifiable information.

3.1.12. System level – Access to the system that is considered full administrative access.  Includes operating system access and hosted application access.

3.1.13 Data Statuses

- In motion

- At Rest

- Processed

3.1.14 – Data Stewards - Data Stewards have been identified for the purpose of enforcing and auditing the procedures and guidelines set forth in this policy.

3.2. Security Responsibility

3.2.1. American Preparatory Academy shall appoint an IT Security Officer (ISO) responsible for overseeing District-wide IT security, to include development of District policies and adherence to the standards defined in this document.

3.3. Training

3.3.1. American Preparatory Academy, led by the ISO, shall ensure that all District employees having access to sensitive information undergo annual IT security training which emphasizes their personal responsibility for protecting student and employee information. - Training resources will be provided to all district employees.

3.3.2. American Preparatory Academy, led by the ISO, shall ensure that all students are informed of Cyber Security Awareness.

3.4. Physical Security

3.4.1. Computer Security

3.4.1.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that any user’s computer must not be left unattended and unlocked, especially when logged into sensitive systems or data including student or employee information. Automatic log off, locks and password screen savers should be used to enforce this requirement.

3.4.1.2. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that all equipment that contains sensitive information will be secured to deter theft.

3.4.2. Server/Network Room Security

3.4.2.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that server rooms and telecommunication rooms/closets are protected by appropriate access control which segregates and restricts access from general school or District office areas. Access control shall be enforced using either keys, electronic card readers, or similar method with only those IT or other staff members having access necessary to perform their job functions are allowed unescorted access.

3.4.2.2. Telecommunication rooms/closets may only remain unlocked or unsecured when because of building design it is impossible to do otherwise or due to environmental problems that require the door to be opened.

       3.4.3. Contractor access

3.4.3.1. Before any contractor is allowed access to any computer system, server room, or telecommunication room the contractor will need to present a company issued identification card, and his/her access will need to confirmed directly by the authorized employee who issued the service request or by American Preparatory Academy’s Technology Department.

3.5. Network Security

3.5.1. Network perimeter controls will be implemented to regulate traffic moving between trusted internal (District) resources and external, untrusted (Internet) entities. All network transmission of sensitive data should enforce encryption where technologically feasible.

3.5.2. Network Segmentation

3.5.2.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that all untrusted and public access computer networks are separated from main district computer networks and utilize security policies to ensure the integrity of those computer networks.

3.5.2.2. American Preparatory Academy will utilize industry standards and current best practices to segment internal computer networks based on the data they contain. This will be done to prevent unauthorized users from accessing services unrelated to their job duties and minimize potential damage from other compromised systems.

3.5.3. Wireless Networks

3.5.3.1. No wireless access point shall be installed on American Preparatory Academy’s computer network that does not conform with current network standards as defined by the Network Manager.  Any exceptions to this must be approved directly in writing by the Information Security Officer.

3.5.3.2. American Preparatory Academy shall scan for and remove or disable any rogue wireless devices on a regular basis.

3.5.3.3. All wireless access networks shall conform to current best practices and shall utilize at minimal WPA encryption for any connections.  Open access networks are not permitted, except on a temporary basis for events when deemed necessary.

3.5.4. Remote Access

3.5.4.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that any remote access with connectivity to the District’s internal network is achieved using the District’s centralized VPN service that is protected by multiple factor authentication systems.  Any exception to this policy must be due to a service provider’s technical requirements and must be approved by the Information Security Officer.

3.6. Access Control

3.6.1. System and application access will be granted based upon the least amount of access to data and programs required by the user in accordance with a business need-to-have requirement.

3.6.2. Authentication

3.6.2.1. American Preparatory Academy shall enforce strong password management for employees, students, and contractors.

3.6.2.2. Password Creation

3.6.2.2.1. All server system-level passwords must conform to the Password Construction Guidelines posted on the American Preparatory Technology Website.

3.6.2.3. Password Protection

3.6.2.3.1. Passwords must not be shared with anyone. All passwords are to be treated as sensitive, Confidential information.

3.6.2.3.2. Passwords must not be inserted into email messages or other forms of electronic communication.

3.6.2.3.3. Passwords must not be revealed over the phone to anyone.

3.6.2.3.4. Do not reveal a password on questionnaires or security forms.

3.6.2.3.5. Do not hint at the format of a password (for example, "my family name").

3.6.2.3.6. Any user suspecting that his/her password may have been compromised must report the incident and change all passwords.

3.6.2. Authorization

3.6.2.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that user access shall be limited to only those specific access requirements necessary to perform their jobs. Where possible, segregation of duties will be utilized to control authorization access.

3.6.2.2. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that user access should be granted and/or terminated upon timely receipt, and management’s approval, of a documented access request/termination.

3.6.3. Accounting

3.6.3.1. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that audit and log files are maintained for at least 90 days for all critical security-relevant events such as: invalid logon attempts, changes to the security policy/ configuration, and failed attempts to access objects by unauthorized users, etc.

3.6.4. Administrative Access Controls

3.6.4.1. American Preparatory Academy shall limit IT administrator privileges (operating system, database, and applications) to the minimum number of staff required to perform these sensitive duties.

3.7. Incident Management

3.7.1. Monitoring and responding to IT related incidents will be designed to provide early notification of events and rapid response and recovery from internal or external network or system attacks.

3.8. Business Continuity

3.8.1. To ensure continuous critical IT services, IT will develop a business continuity/disaster recovery plan appropriate for the size and complexity of District IT operations.

3.8.2. American Preparatory Academy shall develop and deploy a district-wide business continuity plan which should include as a minimum:

●      Backup Data: Procedures for performing routine daily/weekly/monthly backups and storing backup media at a secured location other than the server room or adjacent facilities. As a minimum, backup media must be stored off-site a reasonably safe distance from the primary server room.

●      Secondary Locations: Identify a backup processing location, such as another School or District building.

●      Emergency Procedures: Document a calling tree with emergency actions to include: recovery of backup data, restoration of processing at the secondary location, and generation of student and employee listings for ensuing a full head count of all.


3.9. Malicious Software

3.9.1. Server and workstation protection software will be deployed to identify and eradicate malicious software attacks such as viruses, spyware, and malware.

3.9.2. American Preparatory Academy shall install, distribute, and maintain spyware and virus protection software on all district-owned equipment, i.e. servers, workstations, and laptops.

3.9.3. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that malicious software protection will include frequent update downloads (minimum weekly), frequent scanning (minimum weekly), and that malicious software protection is in active state (real time) on all operating servers/workstations.

3.9.4. American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that all security-relevant software patches (workstations and servers) are applied within thirty days and critical patches shall be applied as soon as possible.

3.9.5. All computers must use the District approved anti-virus solution.

3.9.6. Any exceptions to section 3.9 must be approved by the Information Security Officer.

3.10. Internet Content Filtering

3.10.1. In accordance with Federal and State Law, American Preparatory Academy shall filter internet traffic for content defined in law that is deemed harmful to minors.

3.10.2. American Preparatory Academy acknowledges that technology-based filters are not always effective at eliminating harmful content and due to this, American Preparatory Academy uses a combination of technological means and supervisory means to protect students from harmful online content.

3.10.3. In the event that students take devices home, American Preparatory Academy will provide a technology based filtering solution for those devices.  However, the District will rely on parents to provide the supervision necessary to fully protect students from accessing harmful online content.

3.10.4. Students shall be supervised when accessing the internet and using district owned devices on school property.

3.11. Data Privacy

3.11.1. American Preparatory considers the protection of the data it collects on students, employees and their families to be of the utmost importance.

3.11.2. American Preparatory Academy protects student data in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and privacy Act, 20 U.S. Code §1232g and 34 CFR Part 99 ( “FERPA”), the Government Records and Management Act  U.C.A. §62G-2 ( “GRAMA”), U.C.A. §53A-1-1401 et seq, 15 U.S. Code §§ 6501–6506 (“COPPA”) and Utah Administrative Code R277-487 (“Student Data Protection Act”).

3.11.3.  American Preparatory Academy shall ensure that employee records access shall be limited to only those individuals who have specific access requirements necessary to perform their jobs. Where possible, segregation of duties will be utilized to control authorization access.

3.13. Security Audit and Remediation

3.13.1. American Preparatory Academy shall perform routine security and privacy audits in congruence with the District’s Information Security Audit Plan.

3.13.2 American Preparatory Academy shall appoint a Data Steward for each campus that will have the following responsibilities

Conducts internal audits


Data stewards have been identified for the purpose of enforcing and auditing the procedures and guidelines set forth in this policy.  One data security officer shall be assigned at each school or location. The Data Security Officer will work directly with other Administrators and School Directors to communicate this policy and monitor the security of data.


Data stewards will perform local audits at least monthly.  These audits will include a checklist of assurances from the School Directors and Administrators in accordance to the current data security policies and procedures.  The results of the audit will be provided to the Technology Director for review with the Data Security Committee and lapses or breaches will be resolved according to the Security Breach Response section of this policy.


Data stewards are the local point of contact for any questions regarding this policy.  Any reports made to the Data Security Officer of a breach outside an audit should be handled in the same fashion as those discovered in an audit.  The Data Security Officer will record and report the breach to the Technology Director for discussion with the Data Security Committee and the breach will be resolved according to the Security Breach Response section of this policy.


Utilizes External Audits


American Preparatory Academy will utilize UETN to provide comprehensive external security audits and stay in compliance with all requirement from UETN regarding network connectivity and data security.  The Data Security Committee will review any breaches or findings by UETN and they will be resolved in the same fashion as internally discovered breaches. Guidelines and suggestions provided by the external audit will be reviewed and adopted as necessary by the Data Security committee.


3.13.2. District personnel shall develop remediation plans to address identified lapses that conforms with the District’s Information Security Remediation Plan Template.

3.14. Employee Disciplinary Actions shall be in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and District policies.  Any employee found to be in violation may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment with American Preparatory Academy.

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I-4.8.1 REMEDIATION PLAN

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 4.0 Privacy and School Safety

Section 4.8 Technology Security Policy

Subsection 4.8.1 Remediation Plan


Key Definitions 


An incident is defined as an indication that data may have been lost, stolen, accessed or acquired without authorization.


A Breach is defined as an incident that has been confirmed.


APA categorizes data breaches into 3 primary categories:


  • Internal Risk - An incident brought upon the organization based on the direct actions of a student or staff member. 

  • Employee Risk - An incident that occurs as a result of lack of employee training or malicious employee action.

  • External Risk - An incident that comes about as a result of outside forces. 

Risk Response Teams


Internal Risk Response


APA has an appointed a Data Security Committee that includes the following individuals 

    • IT Director 

    • Data Privacy Manager

    • Data Stewards (Admin at campus) 

    • Business Manager 

    • A member of the Governing Board


Employee Risk 


  • APA has an appointed Data Security Committee Committee that includes the following individuals 

    • IT Director 

    • Data Privacy Manager 

    • Business Manager 

    • HR Partner 

    • Professional Development Team Member 


External Risk 


  • APA has an appointed Data Security Committee that includes the following individuals 

    • IT Director 

    • Data Privacy Manager 

    • IT Security Manager


I. Remediation Policies by Incident Type


A. Internal Risk 


In order to mitigate against Internal Risk, it is critical that our teams establish and maintain security practices in line with industry standards and guidelines from the USBE in regard to data security and data privacy. 


Internal risk mitigation is based on a plan of response when an industry-standard or USBE standard is violated. Remediation involves the following steps for internal risks. It is not required that these steps all happen one at a time; they are often conducted in conjunction or simultaneously with other steps.


  1. An investigation is conducted by a member of the Data Security Committee - Collection of evidence and all information available in regards to the incident. 
    1. This should include interviews of those affected 
    2. This should including interviews of those that reported or discovered the incident 


2. Immediate action to close or remediate breach that doesn't require an immediate policy change

a. For example, the removal or suspension of user access that was responsible

b. Temporary suspension of software or program that was identified in the investigation.


3. Summary of investigation prepared by a member of the Data Security Committee.

4. Meeting of the Data Security Committee to review the findings of the investigation 


    1. In this meeting, a Plan of Action is put into place that covers the following items 

      1. Communication to those that were affected 

      2. Reporting/Communication to any required entities 

      3. Review of short-term steps taken to close the immediate breach. 

      4. Review of any resources needed to make permanent changes to address the breach 

      5. Review of any disciplinary action recommended for staff or student 

 B. Employee Risk 


Employee risk remediation is focused on prevention rather than reactive planning. It is the policy at APA that at a minimum once per year all staff receive data security and data privacy training. This is considered part of their Professional Development requirements each year. 


The curriculum for this training is updated annually by the IT Director and the Data Privacy Manager to ensure compliance with State and Federal guidelines.


In the event of an incident or confirmed breach involving employee action, the steps are similar to Internal and External risks however a member of the HR team is involved in all steps. 


  1. An investigation is conducted by a member of the Data Security Committee in partnership with an HR Team member - Collection of evidence and all information available in regards to the incident. 


  1. This should include interviews of those affected 

  2. This should including interviews of those that reported or discovered the incident 


2. Immediate action to close or remediate breach that doesn't require an immediate policy change


    1. For example, the removal or suspension of user access that was responsible 


      1. Temporary suspension of software or program that was identified in the investigation.

      2. Summary of investigation prepared by a member of the Data Security Committee.

      3. Meeting of the Data Security Committee to review the findings of the investigation 

      4. In this meeting, a Plan of Action is put into place that covers the following items 


        1. Communication to those that were affected 

        2. Reporting/Communication to any required entities 

        3. Review of short-term steps taken to close the immediate breach. 

        4. Review of any resources needed to make permanent changes to address the breach 

        5. Review of any disciplinary action recommended for staff or student 


C. External Risk 


External risk functions the same as the other categories with the following exceptions


  1. Due to the most likely highly technical nature of these risks specialized IT staff is often involved immediately and investigations are conducted as a team rather than as an individual 

  2. External risk is one of the most expensive items to remediate or prevent and as such it is reviewed on a quarterly basis to ensure that we have the required ongoing funding for mitigating these risks.  

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I-5.0 STUDENT SUPERVISION

I-5.1 GENERAL SUPERVISION

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.1 General Supervision


Policy Statement:

General Supervision

Students should not be left unattended in classrooms, wherever possible.  K-6 students should line up in the hall outside the classroom or breakout room and wait to be invited in by the teacher.  The classroom door should be closed and locked if teacher is not or cannot be there.

K-6 teachers need to pick up their classes in the multi-purpose room in the mornings at 8:05 and lead them to their classrooms.

It is important that whenever possible, staff members are not alone with one student.  It is best to have two staff members present in as many settings as possible, for the protection of the staff members.  However, as this is not often possible, staff should at least be careful to avoid being alone with one student.  If there are less than three students working with a teacher or instructor, they need to be in an open, public area.  If this is not possible, doors should remain open at the least.  This also applies to after-school events such as tutoring or other extra-curricular activities or clubs.

Staff may not use physical force with students in order to achieve compliance, except in matters of personal safety (either the student's safety or the staff member's safety).  Staff may not utilize corporal punishment defined as a painful, intentionally inflicted physical penalty administered by a person in authority for disciplinary purposes.  Doing so is grounds for immediate termination. 

Appropriate student/staff physical contact includes the 3 "H"'s:  High 5's, Side Hugs and Handshakes.  It is not recommended that side hugs be used as staff/student contact in Secondary (7-12) with students of the opposite sex.


Additional Student Supervision Guidelines

Students may not be unattended in classrooms or other areas of the school.  K-6 students must line up in the hall outside of a classroom or breakout room and wait to be invited in by the instructional staff member.  The classroom/breakout room doors must be closed and locked when exiting a room to prevent the occurrence of unattended students.  Staff shall carry their keys so they can easily unlock doors when needed and resist leaving doors unlocked.

When activities are held after school, the adult in charge of the event/activity/tutoring is responsible for supervision, ensuring that students are not left unattended.  This includes remaining at the school until all students are picked up by their parents and preventing students from wandering freely through the school.  When an activity or after school event is held, the adult in charge may not leave until all students are picked up.  The adult must check the interior and exterior of the school thoroughly for all stragglers before leaving the premises.    

When informal gatherings occur, when no activity or event is scheduled, or after an activity has ended,  administrative staff, or if not present, instructional staff shall ensure that students or youth visitors are not left unattended.  Staff shall actively discourage them at every opportunity and have them call and get a ride as soon as possible.  If necessary, staff shall call the Police to remove abandoned children.  Staff shall report repeat offenders to the junior high admin team or the general school office, whichever is appropriate.

Staff members are encouraged to not keep their own children with them at the school outside of regular school hours.  Staff shall keep their children in the same room as themselves when their children must be present.  Staff children are not to be unattended in the school building.  Students, including staff children, are not allowed to be outside on the south or east sides of the building for any reason to ensure student safety and to promote respect and consideration for our residential neighbors to the south and corporate neighbors to the east.  Utah Charter Academies or its agents, subcontractors or assignees are not responsible for staff children safety or security outside of the regular school day in-session time.

Though there are no boundaries preventing a staff member from addressing an issue, the Junior High Assistant Director, Junior High Secretary and Junior High Teachers primarily oversee Junior High students and all other staff primarily oversee elementary students.

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I-5.2 PLAYGROUND SUPERVISION

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.2 Playground Supervision


Policy Statement:

Playground Supervision

Staff should carry a pack that includes a whistle, bandaids, and a red emergency card.  In case of an emergency, the staff member should give the red emergency card to a student to take to the front office to summon help.


Playground Equipment General Rules: 

Staff members who are assigned playground duty should abide by the following safety rules:

  • Students may not leave the fenced area.  Staff must retrieve balls that go beyond the fence.
  • No hard balls are allowed on the front field of the school yard.
  • The following items are not allowed on school premises:
    • Skateboards
    • Trampolines
    • Roller skates; roller blades, wheelies
  • Draper Students should not be allowed to play on the berms in front of the building as this is very distracting to students in the classrooms.
  • Secondary Students are not allowed to play on the playground equipment.


Students should be instructed on:

  • Safe equipment use.  Instructors and playground supervisors must watch students carefully and ensure no unsafe behaviors are allowed to occur.  Playground supervisors will stop any unsafe behavior immediately and re-teach students.  If students do not comply, they will be banned from equipment use for a specified time period.  At this point, parents must be notified of the ban and will be asked to speak with their student regarding playground behavior. 
  • Keeping the playground clean.  Litter and trash should be picked up and properly disposed of each recess.
  • Being 'CHAMPs' on the playground.  They should be taught to play cooperatively together, to include others and to be respectful and kind at all times.


Playground supervisors:

  • May not use their cell phones during recess. They must be observing students at all times and teaching students appropriate, safe play behavior.   
  • May engage in conversation with one another but should ensure they are properly supervising students and are in close enough proximity to the students that they can determine what is transpiring at all times and take action as needed (including interrupting verbal bullying).
  • Must use good judgment.  Long lists of playground rules do not replace the use of good judgment on the playground and may actually inhibit it.  Activities that are perfectly safe for some students, may be taken to the next level by other students and become suddenly unsafe.


Additional Safety Rules:

Students may not play any games involving horseplay such as tackling, grabbing, wrestling, tripping or fighting.  Students may not climb on fences, tetherball poles, benches, tables or basketball standards.  Students may not jump over benches, trashcans or other playground equipment.  Students may not slide on the benches and tables, whether wet, dry, frozen or not.  Students may not bring playground equipment from home.  Bats, sticks or otherwise dangerous toys or equipment are not permitted. Insurance regulations prohibit skateboards, rollerblades or wheelies on school property (this includes after school activities).  Students may not play on the berms.  Students may not push or pull other students who are playing on equipment.   Students who are running, chasing, or tagging must do so away from any fixed equipment (including tables and benches), and away from four square, jump rope, or basketball games.  Students may not climb on the top of play equipment, including the monkey bars and zip beam. Students may not leave the fenced area.  Staff must retrieve balls that go beyond the fence.  Staff members must carry a pack that includes a whistle, Band-Aids and a red emergency card. 

In the event of an emergency, a staff member should give the red emergency card to a student (runner) to take to the front office to summon help.

Students must be instructed on safe equipment use.  Staff shall watch students carefully and ensure no unsafe behaviors are allowed to occur.  Playground supervisors must stop any unsafe behavior immediately and re-teach students.  If students do not comply, they will be banned from equipment use for a specified time period.  At this point, parents must be notified of the ban and will be asked to speak with their student regarding playground behavior.  Staff shall not stand in one place, but shall circulate and supervise all of the children out at recess, ensuring adequate supervision at all times. Staff may not use their cell phones on the playground during recess duty.  

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I-5.2.1 SPINNER SAFETY AND USE*

Policy Statement:

  1. In general, the small stand-up spinners are to be “pushed” by the people who are using them, not another student.
  2. The larger spinners may be pushed by a student not on the spinner. The “pusher” must be trained and TRUSTED to do the following:
    1. ask others if they are ready, and get an affirmative answer from each one, before they begin pushing
    2. remind the riders to hold on tight, and yell “stop” if they are losing their grip
    3. the spinner must demonstrate that they are able to stop or slow the spinner at this point, safely. This is dependent on the pusher not pushing too fast that they are not able to stop it.
    4. The pusher is RESPONSIBLE to ensure all the students are able to STAY ON THE SPINNER and have a safe ride. Those are the goals. If any spinners fall of due to it going too fast (not because the student let go and jumped off) the pusher is not allowed to be a pusher for one week, and needs to be able to recite the rules of pushing before they push again. (Some kids innocently believe that the goal is to push it so fast that students fall off. This is a natural assumption to some active minds. That is why the rules must be taught explicitly to the students, along with the GOALS.) 
    5. A trained instructor (not a substitute) should be placed on the playground near the large spinners supervising them and ensuring the students know the rules, and know the goals, and know their jobs.

One rule or guideline we didn’t establish but I believe would be a good idea is communicating the length of the ride. The pusher should be told the maximum revolutions they can push for each ride (an overall number that doesn’t change - like 10). And the instructor supervising can modify that at any time if they see danger (a child with weak grip, for example - “we are going to do 5 this time!"). Any child who gets on should know that if I get on, the pusher is going to push for “X" revolutions, so I need to be able to handle this for “X" revolutions, and at that point I can be confident the ride will be over and I will be able to get off.

It is fine to have the revolutions be much less depending on who is riding - but having a maximum number would be a good idea. For example, if a student gets on and says “I need to only do 5, I want to make sure I don’t get sick” or “I don’t know if I can hold on” the pusher needs to listen and say “ok 5 pushes everyone!” and then do 5 pushes and let people get off if they want to.

I have seen spinners be very safe and a great tool for cooperation, for students learning to work together, for students to learn their limits, and try new things with courage. We have had years with no broken bones at all. I believe they are GREAT playground tools to promote large muscle activity, coordination and strength. But they must be managed properly. This requires consistent, ongoing training of the students AND of the instructors. If they are taught well, and held accountable, we can have virtually NO INJURIES on spinners. The “real problem” is not a piece of equipment. It is a lack of training and supervision and accountability.

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I-5.3 LUNCHTIME SUPERVISION

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.3 Lunchtime Supervision


Policy Statement:

Lunchtime Supervision

Elementary:  Students eat lunch at their desks.  Students may have access to microwave ovens* in the classroom.  It is very important that there is adequate supervision of the microwave ovens as these create a potential hazard to students.  As there is not enough time each day for all students to use the microwave oven, if microwaves are available, a schedule should be created so the students know which day they may bring items that require the microwave oven. 


There should be a 10-minute "chew time" at the beginning of lunch during which students should concentrate on eating their lunch and little conversation should occur.  During this time, the instructor may wish to read aloud to the students or play a book on tape.  After the chew time students should be allowed to converse and finish eating their lunch.  Students should be allowed to finish their lunches, and 20 minutes should be scheduled to give them ample time to eat.  If a student needs more time, they should be allowed to take their lunch out to recess and finish. 

 * not all campuses have microwave ovens available in classrooms.


Jr. High:  Lunch is divided into three periods by grade.  Lunch period is 30 minutes.  There will be two lunchtime supervisors at a minimum each day.  Students must go to the lunch room to eat their lunch.  If a teacher wishes to meet with a student during lunchtime, the student must show a pass to one of the lunchtime supervisors.  Students may not eat their lunches in the classrooms.  After lunch each day, students will have time to go outside (weather permitting) but MAY NOT return to the classroom areas without a pass during lunchtime. Lunchtime supervisors must ensure students leave the lunch and recess areas clear of all trash and wipe down tables and benches prior to the end of the lunch period.

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I-5.4 CARPOOL SUPERVISION

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.4 Carpool Supervision


Policy Statement:

Carpool supervision

All Staff will have an assignment during afternoon carpool hours.  Many staff members will have an assignment during morning carpool hours also. Please plan your day accordingly.  It is imperative that staff be outside before 3:30 to begin carpool duty. 

There are six stations for carpool pickup, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple.  Each station must be manned by at least one staff member.  One staff member will "clear the field", encouraging students to get to their appropriate station and refrain from lingering or playing on the field.  One staff member will facilitate traffic flow.  One staff member will stand at the end of the sidewalk (where the barricade is placed) to ensure students remain in the carpool area until a parent picks them up.  One staff member will monitor the inside hallway.  One staff member will monitor the east door to ensure students don't leave via that exit unless accompanied by a parent.

At 3:50, two carpool attendants will remain out at the carpool line with the remaining students.  At 4:00 p.m., any remaining students will be brought into the building to wait for their parents and a late pickup form will be filled out.  The school secretaries will supervise waiting children.  Parents are required to come in and check out their students after 4:00 p.m.


Student Behavior at carpool:  Carpool attendants MUST enforce carpool behavior rules. 

  • Students are to walk directly to their vehicle.
  • No students are allowed to play on the playground during carpool pickup.
  • No pushing, shoving, or horseplay of any kind. 
  • Hands, feet and belongings must be kept to self.
  • No swinging of backpacks, lunchboxes, or any other items.
  • No yelling, screaming, or speaking in loud voices.
  • Students are expected to have all belongings when they go out to carpool.  They are generally not allowed back in the school.


Students who refuse to comply with these rules after teaching and warning will be sent in to the secretary and placed on carpool suspension for one week.  Administrator's will fill out the suspension form, and require the students parents to come inside to sign form and pick up their child.   The Jr. High Secretary or Assistant Director will notify parents of Jr. High students placed on carpool suspension.  Parents will be required to pick up students.  

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I-5.5 BLEACHERS OPERATION AND SUPERVISION

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.4 Bleachers Operations and Supervision

  

Policy Statement:

Bleachers Operation and Supervision

To ensure bending does not damage the understructure, no persons may climb on the bleachers when they are in a closed position.  Staff shall never allow students or others to sit alone or as a group on top of the bleachers when they are in a closed position.  When electronically opening or closing the bleachers, two authorized adult staff members must be present to ensure safety and the even, aligned rolling operation of the bleacher system to prevent bending through misalignment.  The electronic controller must be kept securely in the Operation Manager's office.

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I-5.6 PARENT SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 5.0 Student Supervision

Section 5.6 Parent Supervisory Responsibilities


Policy Statement:

Parent Supervisory Responsibilities

Parents are responsible for the safety and supervision of their children who are not students at American Preparatory Academy at all times when on the American Preparatory Academy campus.  Parents are responsible for the safety and supervision of their children who are students at American Preparatory Academy when the children are on campus outside of regular school hours, whether at school-sponsored events, school activities or on campus for other reasons.

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I-6.0 VOLUNTEER-STUDENT SECURITY

I-6.1 VOLUNTEER GUIDELINES

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 6.0 Volunteer-Student Security

Section 6.1 Volunteer Guidelines


Policy Statement:

Volunteer Guidelines

American Prep asks families to provide 20 hours per year of volunteer service.  Most of our families provide MANY more hours than this!  We consistently log over 10,000 volunteer hours per year, thanks to our INCREDIBLE families and their generous gift of time and talents.  This extraordinary service makes it possible for our students to have an outstanding educational experience, which would not be possible without our volunteers' assistance.  THANK YOU parents!!

It is important that volunteers work together as team members with American Prep staff members.  The following guidelines are helpful in ensuring that volunteer service is a positive experience for parents and is effective for our students.

  • Volunteers must sign in and out at the front office, get a Volunteer badge and wear it during the time you are in the building volunteering.
  • Volunteer Dress & Behavior - please dress appropriately.  The more we show respect for our school, the more respect the students will feel toward the school.  American Prep's dress code is reflective of a high level of respect.  We encourage volunteers to reflect this same level of respect in their own appearance when they volunteer at the school.
  • Volunteers work under the supervision of staff.
  • As a matter of professional ethics, and personal privacy, volunteers do not discuss teacher, student or school affairs with other people. It is extremely important that confidentiality be upheld at all times. Administrators have the same expectations of confidentiality from volunteers as they do from the American Prep staff.
  • Volunteers may be asked to grade student papers, and it is imperative that student work is ONLY discussed with the teacher or student, if directed by the teacher, and no one else.
  • For your own protection, avoid being alone with one or two students.  If this is unavoidable, be sure and keep the door open or move to a hallway to work.
  • Student Discipline:  Volunteers have a responsibility to inform staff if there is a problem with student behavior. Volunteers should not discipline a child unless they are expressly instructed to do so by the supervising staff member.
  • If you are scheduled to work in the classroom with students, bringing young children is not recommended as they may become a distraction in the classroom.  If you are coming to a meeting or a group work activity, bringing younger siblings may be acceptable.  Volunteers are responsible for the safety and supervision of their own children who may be younger siblings, or any children that they bring with them, on APA campuses at all times.
  • Volunteers have no claim to intellectual property created during their volunteer service at American Prep.


Policy Cross-Reference:   C-9.1E-7.3, and F-7.2 Volunteer Guidelines

                                            C-9.2E-7.4F-7.3 and I-6.2 Volunteer Agreement


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I-6.2 VOLUNTEER AGREEMENT

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 6.0 Volunteer.Student Security

Section 6.2 Volunteer Agreement


Policy Statement:

Volunteer Agreement (Signed by every parent/guardian volunteer.)

The talents and services of volunteers are important to American Preparatory Academy (the school) in accomplishing its Mission.  The purpose of this document is to:

  1. Establish standards and guidelines for volunteer services so that both the volunteer and the school understand the parameters of the volunteer relationship. 
  2. Reduce the risk of unwanted legal exposure of volunteers and the school.
  3. Promote safety for volunteers, students, and employees.

 

Non-Disclosure Agreement

Volunteering activities may require access to information that is confidential or otherwise considered by the federal government, state government, school, community, parents, guardians or students to be privileged and confidential.  Such information is identified by the school and must be determined to be confidential within the definitions of the law.  If these criteria are met, such information may be received and maintained by staff or volunteers under a promise of confidentiality for a prescribed period of time to perform a specific task.

Maintaining the confidentiality of such information is primarily the responsibility of school administration.  However, faculty, staff and volunteers with access to confidential information undertake this responsibility as part of their employment or volunteering activities.

This Agreement shall govern the conditions of disclosure by the school of certain "Confidential Information" including but not limited to student information, school records, staff information, staff records, financial information, data, trade secrets and intellectual property relating to the school and its staff and student body.   With regard to the Confidential Information, I agree:

  1. To safeguard the information against disclosure to others with the same degree of care as I would exercise with my own information of a similar nature.
  2. Not to disclose the information to others, without the express written permission of the American Preparatory Academy of Draper.
  3. That the secrecy obligations with respect to the confidential information shall continue indefinitely.


Acknowledgements and Work Product Agreement

  1. I release the school and its officers, employees, representatives and contracted affiliates from any responsibility or liability for personal injury, including death, and damage to or loss of property that I may incur while volunteering at the school or in connection with school activities or events.
  2. I acknowledge that I neither gain nor retain ownership rights to the work product of the material provided to me, used, or created by me in conjunction with any school project.  I understand that the school has sole ownership of the work product and may use the results of my efforts in any manner appropriate including licensing such work product to others.  I agree to return school materials provided to me in connection with volunteering activities.  
  3. The school accepts the lawful service of all volunteers with the understanding that such service is at the sole discretion of the school.  I understand that the school may at any time, for whatever reason, revoke volunteering privileges.
  4. As a volunteer, I understand that I may not speak or make statements on behalf of the school, indebt the school, nor may I speak to the media or make public statements about the school or its facility, operations, staff, students, visitors or volunteers.
  5. I understand that while volunteering, I must follow the policies and procedures of the school under the direction of school staff.  I understand that I will not be compensated for my services.


Safe School Environment and Code of Conduct Acknowledgement

 The school strives to provide a safe and nurturing learning environment for students and staff.  With regard to providing a safe school environment:

  1. I understand that I am expected to maintain a high ethical and professional standard in their interaction with both adults and minors.
  2. I understand that I am prohibited from using physical discipline (including corporal punishment) in any way for the behavior management of students.  I understand that clear professional boundaries must exist between minors and adults.
  3. I agree that I shall not engage in any form of unlawful, unacceptable or offensive behavior with students, parents/legal guardians, staff or visitors to the school which may include, but is not limited to (a) verbal harassment, such as derogatory comments, jokes, or slurs; (b) visual harassment, such as derogatory or sexually explicit printed material, books, magazines, posters, cards, calendars, cartoons, graffiti, drawings, notes, or gestures; (c) sexual advances or other physical conduct or contact of a sexual nature; (d) physical harassment, such as inappropriate touching, hitting, kicking, grabbing or any other form of aggressive, abrasive or harassing physical contact; (e) other behavior deemed offensive or inappropriate by school administration.
  4. I agree to promptly report any activity to school administration that I observe that places a student in distress or danger, and I agree to take appropriate steps to immediately intervene and to provide a safe environment for the student.
  5. I understand that unless the school has a parent or legal guardian's knowledge and consent in the form of a written permission slip, I am never to drive students in my vehicle, before, during or after school unless there is a medical emergency requiring immediate medical care.  When authorized to do so, I will operate my vehicle in accordance with the law. 
  6. I understand that school programs, extra-curricular activities or special instruction sessions shall not be conducted by only one adult without additional adult presence and/or must be conducted at times and locations that promote accountability, in an open room or hallway setting without closed doors, and only if readily observable by others who may be in the room or hallway, and meet accepted standards of propriety.
  7. I understand that I may not be alone in locker rooms or other dressing rooms with a single or small group of students without another adult present.  I understand that I am prohibited from these areas while students are changing.


As a volunteer at the school, I acknowledge receipt of the Volunteer Agreement.  I understand the policies and procedures contained in these documents.

I agree, as a condition of service at the American Preparatory Academy to abide by these policies and procedures.  I understand that the school reserves the right to withdraw my volunteering privileges at any time with or without cause, with or without notice.   

  

Policy Cross-references: C-9.2E-7.4, and F-7.3 Volunteer Agreement

                                           B-7.3D-6.4, and F-4.2 Student Privacy

                                           D-3.1 Staff to Student Guidelines

 

Office Forms:                    OF E-7.4 Volunteer Agreement Form


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I-6.3 FIELD TRIP DRIVERS*

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 6.0 Volunteer and Student Security

Section 6.3 Field Trip Drivers


Policy Statement:

School Policy:  Transportation of students at the American Preparatory Academy will be preformed in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations of the State of Utah as applicable to K-12th grade public schools.  When possible, the school will contract for bus services through qualified providers operating within the State of Utah and obeying all laws and regulations of the State of Utah, its divisions and agencies, including qualified vehicle safety, driver certification and liability insurance.  A current insurance certificate and acknowledgement of compliance with laws and regulations as applicable to K-12th grade public school transportation is required.   

Employee and/or approved volunteer drivers (not a contracted bus service provider) are required to complete the State of Utah's Driver Safety Program, provide a copy of their valid driver's license and a copy of their current automobile liability insurance policy proof of coverage.  All persons in private vehicles (non-contracted busses) are required to wear seat belts at all times.  Employee and/or volunteer drivers must also agree to the following:        

To qualify, please check all boxes

  •  I acknowledge that I have received a copy of and read the State of Utah's Driver's Safety Training Defensive Driving Handbook. 
  •  I acknowledge that I have viewed the State of Utah's Driver Safety Program video.
  •  I agree to obey all traffic laws and signs, including the speed limit.
  •  I understand that it is unlawful in the Sate of Utah for a vehicle transporting K-12th grade public school students to carry more than ten (10) persons, including the driver or other adult passengers, at one time in any one vehicle.  I agree not to carry more than ten (10) persons (total including the driver), in any one vehicle.
  •  I understand that my auto policy (owner's auto policy) is the primary insurer in the event of an automobile accident on a school-sponsored event.
  •  I agree to only use a vehicle that is in safe operating condition.  I will make sure that my vehicle has enough seat belts for each passenger and I  will enforce the school's mandatory seat belt policy.
  •  I agree not to make unauthorized stops for any reason other than a vehicle break down.  In the event of a vehicle break down, I will contact the school immediately and I will ensure the safety of myself and passengers to the best of my ability.
  •  I agree not to be alone with a student (other than my own) at any time, including during student transportation.
  •  I understand that the school will perform a criminal background check on me. 
  •  I understand that the school reserves the right to refuse my services as a driver or revoke driver approval at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice.

*create & attach form

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I-6.4 VISITORS ON CAMPUS

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 6.0 Volunteer.Student Security

Section 6.4 Visitors on Campus


Policy Statement:

Visitors on Campus

All visitors to school campus are required to enter through the main entrance, stop at the school office and sign in.  The school prohibits visitors from knocking to gain entrance or entering from any other door.  Upon approval, visitors will receive a Visitors Badge and may enter other areas of the school as authorized.  Upon exiting, visitors must sign out and surrender Visitor Badges.  The school reserves the right to limit access when a compromise, or perceived compromise, to school, staff or student safety is present, or eminently present, or when student instruction may be disrupted.  Unauthorized visitors may be escorted from the school premises or property and school staff are authorized to contact the police department for assistance by force if necessary.  Visitors may not harass, threaten or bully others on school property, including their own family members.

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I-7.0 ALLEGED ABUSE

I-7.1 CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT

Chapter H - Behavior

Part 7.0 Alleged Abuse

Section 7.1 Child Abuse or Neglect


Policy Statement:

Child Abuse or Neglect

Any staff member who witnesses or suspects child abuse or neglect is responsible to report such abuse or neglect to the proper legal authority.  The staff member is encouraged to bring this information to the School Director, who may also make a report.  However, regardless of the action or inaction of the school, it is the responsibility of any adult in the state of Utah who witnesses or suspects abuse or neglect to report this information to the Division of Child and Family Services, 281-5151.

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I-7.2 SEXUAL ABUSE OR INNUENDO

Chapter H - Behavior

Part 7.0 Alleged Abuse

Section 7.2 Sexual Abuse or Innuendo

  

Policy Statement:

Sexual Abuse or Innuendo

Sexual abuse or innuendo, both physical and verbal, will not be tolerated at the schools.  Accusations of sexual abuse or innuendo claimed by a student will result in the immediate investigation of said claim.  Persons accused in the alleged abuse will be asked to leave the premises during the investigation.  Parents/legal guardians will be notified as instructed by the Director.  All persons involved will be interviewed as part of an investigation to determine the validity of the claim.  The school will contact authorities as instructed by the Director.   Persons found guilty of sexual abuse will not be allowed on campus and will have employment or volunteer privileges terminated permanently and may be subject to legal action.

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I-8.0 INTERNET

I-8.1 INTERNET SAFETY AND ACCEPTABLE USE

*

Chapter I - Health and Safety

Part 8.0 Internet

Section 8.1 Internet Safety and Acceptable Use


Policy Statement:

The Governing Board recognizes the need for a policy governing the use of the electronic information resources by students and staff. Responsibility is delegated to School Administration for implementing the policy according to established guidelines.

Internet Safety and Acceptable Use references the use of electronic information software and hardware resources made available to staff and students by the American Preparatory, and includes student or staff members’ personal electronic devices accessing the school’s network.   These resources include, but are not limited to, voice mail, electronic mail, the Internet, wireless transmission and other network files or accounts provided to staff or students, computer hardware, including computers, computer processors, computing devices, wireless hardware and software, printers, scanners, copiers and all other peripheral and computer networking equipment. Staff and student use of electronic information resources must be in support of education and/or research and must be consistent with the educational objectives of American Prep. While access to all materials on a worldwide network cannot be controlled, Internet access in the school is filtered and monitored on an ongoing basis.


Access to Technology

American Preparatory Academy works individually with households to ensure students will have access to all necessary technology, materials, and services required to access content and complete assignments.


Introduction

It is the policy of American Preparatory Academy to:

  1. prevent users from accessing or transmitting inappropriate material over its network via the Internet, electronic mail, or other forms of direct electronic communications;
  2. prevent unauthorized access and other unlawful online activity;
  3. prevent unauthorized online disclosure, use, or dissemination of personal identification information of minors; and
  4. comply with the Children’s Internet Protection Act [Pub. L. No. 106-554 and 47 USC 254(h)].


Access to Inappropriate Material

To the extent practical, technology protection measures including Internet filters shall be used to block or filter the Internet or other forms of electronic communications and access to inappropriate information.  All filtering technology and software will be certified as compliant with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).

Specifically, as required by the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), blocking shall be applied to visual depictions of material deemed obscene or to child pornography or to any material deemed harmful to minors.  Additional categories may be limited or blocked as deemed necessary by the Technology Director.

Technology protection measures may not be disabled on any student devices but may be temporarily disabled on a staff computer only for bona fide research or other lawful purposes.


Inappropriate Network Usage

To the extent practical, steps shall be taken to promote the safety and security of users of the American Preparatory Academy’s online computer network when using electronic mail, chat rooms, instant messaging, and other forms of direct electronic communications.

Specifically, as required by the Children’s Internet Protection Act prevention of inappropriate network usage includes:

    1      unauthorized access, including so-called hacking, and other unlawful activities; and

    2      unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal identification information regarding minors.

Any person found to be using a device to access inappropriate material or attempting to bypass the protective systems outlined in this policy will be subject to limited use.  All appropriate parties will be notified of any inappropriate use, including parents and administrators.  If deemed necessary by the school’s administration the offender will have their access to school network and technology resources discontinued.


Education, Supervision and Monitoring

It shall be the responsibility of all members of the American Preparatory Academy’s staff to educate, supervise and monitor student usage of the online computer network and access to the Internet in accordance with this policy and the Children’s Internet Protection Act.  Monitoring computer usage requires the American Preparatory Academy staff member or authorized volunteer to be present and actively observing usage at all times in which a student has access to the computer.  The assigned staff member may not be engaged in other activities that would prohibit them from observing the usage of the computers.

Students are only permitted to access the network resources through school owned devices.  Personal devices and staff owned devices should not be used by students except to contact help in emergency situations.  Exceptions may be granted to students using devices in compliance with an IEP or as a temporary aid.  Exceptions may only be granted by the Technology Director.  Any device used outside this policy may be confiscated by a school administrator.

Procedures for the disabling or otherwise modifying any technology protection measures shall be the responsibility of the Technology Directory or designated representatives.

The administration or designated representatives will provide age appropriate training for students who use American Preparatory Academy’s Internet facilities.  The training provided will be designed to promote American Preparatory Academy’s commitment to:

  1. The standards and acceptable use of Internet services as set forth in the Internet Safety Policy;
  2. Student safety with regard to:
    1. safety on the Internet;
    2. appropriate behavior while on online, on social networking Web sites, and in chat rooms; and
    3. cyberbullying awareness and response.
  3. Compliance with the E-rate requirements of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (“CIPA”).


In accordance with UT 53A-15-1302, a seminar will be provided annually to educate parents on internet safety and other relevant student safety topics.

Following receipt of this training, the student will acknowledge that he/she received the training and understood it.  Each student and their parent or guardian will be given a copy of the Internet Safety Policy and Network Acceptable Use Policy and will sign them indicating that they will abide by the rules and usage requirements therein prior to that student being given access to network and technology resources at American Preparatory Academy.


Public Review

The Internet Safety and Acceptable Use policy was developed in collaboration with the school community at public land trust and governing board meetings.  Revisions to this policy will be on an as-needed basis under the direction of the Technology Director.


Terms and Conditions of This Policy

  1. Acceptable Network Use
    1. Staff and students will use the Internet and other electronic information resources in an appropriate manner, abiding by the rules and regulations described in this policy.
    2. Staff and students who formally publish school related information on the Internet must have proper approvals and abide by school publishing guidelines and procedures.
    3. Staff and students are expected to abide by generally accepted rules of network etiquette. These rules include, but are not limited to, being polite, never sending or encouraging others to send abusive messages, and always using appropriate language.
    4. Unacceptable Network Use
      1. Staff and students may not intentionally transmit or receive material in violation of law or school policy. This includes, but is not limited to, pornographic, indecent or sexually suggestive materials, weapons, controlled substances or alcohol, or incendiary devices. Users are prohibited from posting or sending content that contains threats or is hatefully or racially, ethically or otherwise objectionable. 
      2. Staff and students may not participate in or promote any illegal or inappropriate activities, disruptive use of the network, including disruptive or unauthorized wired, BlueTooth, wireless transmissions, or activities of any kind that do not conform to the rules, regulations and policies of American Prep.
      3. Staff and students may not use the network for product advertisement or political lobbying.
      4. Staff and students may not reveal personal information such as names, addresses, telephone numbers, passwords, credit card numbers or social security numbers. Releasing personal information of others or that of organizations associated with the school is prohibited.
      5. Staff and students may not intentionally harm or destroy school data, the network, or network performance. This includes, but is not limited to, creation and introduction of computer viruses, unauthorized access to restricted systems or programs, or using the school network to illegally access other systems.
      6. Staff and students may not post or transmit photographs, videos or other works of students or staff on the Internet or through communication channels (photographed or recorded at the school, in association with the school, or at school events of any kind) or other electronic files of any kind without the permission of the staff member's direct supervisor or student's academic administrator, and those person(s), parent(s)/ legal guardians or staff members who are the subject, or are incidental participants, involved or contained in electronic file(s). 
      7. Expectation of Privacy
        1. Staff and student files, disks, documents, etc., which have been used or created with school electronic resources are not considered private.  Staff and students have no expectation of privacy in hardware or software, files, disks, documents, websites, blogs or any other electronic medium that are created, stored, downloaded, accessed and/or used in any form on the American Prep network, servers, Internet connections or other computer components owned or on the premises of American Prep.
        2. Likewise, staff and students shall have no expectation of privacy regarding electronic mail transmissions which have been created, received, or sent with school resources.
      8. Discussion/Submission
        1. A parent or legal guardian will participate in a discussion with his/her student regarding proper behavior and use of the network as outlined in this policy.
        2. Staff and students may be required to submit a new Staff/Student Signature of Agreement Form each year or upon special request.
      9. Disciplinary Action
        1. Signatures indicate that the staff member or student (and parent/legal guardian) has carefully read, understood, and agreed to abide by these terms and conditions regarding proper behavior and use of the network. Signatures on the Staff/Student Signature of Agreement Form are legally binding.
        2. Students who violate the terms and conditions of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including the possibility of suspension or expulsion from school and appropriate legal action. Access to electronic information may be limited, suspended or revoked.
        3.  Staff who violate the terms and conditions of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including the possibility of suspension or termination of employment with the school and appropriate legal action. Access to electronic information may be limited, suspended or revoked.
        4. Staff members are required to return all school supplies and equipment, including technology equipment, issued to them or in their possession in the event their employment is terminated by either party, for any reason, before the former staff member’s final check will be issued.


American Preparatory Academy makes no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, for the electronic information resources it is providing. The school will not be responsible for any damages a staff member or student suffers while using these resources. These damages may include, but are not limited to, loss of data as a result of delays, employee errors or omissions, or non-deliveries or service interruptions caused by a network system. Use of information obtained by the network system is at the employee's own risk. The American Preparatory Academy specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy of information obtained through the electronic information resources.


 

Legal References:     UT 53G-9-703 (previously 53A-15-1302 before 2018 Recodification)

                                    Children's Internet Protection Act [Pub. L. No. 106-554 and 47 USC 254(h)]


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I-SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

I-HANDOUTS

HO I-1.7 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM PARENT INFORMATION


National School Lunch Program

American Preparatory Academy 2013/2014


We are so excited to announce the implementation of the National School Lunch Program into all five of American Preparatory Academy campuses!  The lunch program will begin August 26, the first day of school.  The lunch program is totally optional and students are able to bring lunch from home if the family desires.  This school lunch program is offered as a convenience to our families and in no way is required. Each campus will have their own Nutrition Manager at their campus to serve lunch and answer questions regarding the lunch program.  All lunch orders and payment will be handled online.  If special circumstances exist, please contact the Nutrition Manager at your students' campus for further information.


General Information: Lunches will be provided by Smart Lunches, a vended food provider.  The price and quantity of food for each size is regulated by the National School Lunch Program through Federal legislation. There is no charge for families qualifying for free lunch. If a family qualifies for reduced price lunch, the cost to the parent is $0.40 per lunch. Otherwise, costs are as follows: K-5th grade: $2.70; 6th-8th grade: $3.00; 9th-12th grade: $3.30. 


Families who would like their students to be able to participate in the school lunch program any time during the 2013/14 school year need to complete the three steps outlined below prior to being able to order a lunch for their child

 

Getting Started: Steps 1 and 2 must occur at least 3 days before placing your first order. Step 3 must occur at least 1 day before lunch is provided.


1.  Free/Reduced Application:


Each family needs to fill out this application to determine their payment eligibility status for the year.  If a family is certain that they do not qualify for reduced/free eligibility, they still need to fill out the application and just write "not eligible" in the area that asks for income.  This application is a requirement of the National School Lunch Program.  Applications can be filled out and submitted online or paper applications may be picked up and returned to the students' campus.  Attachment 1 details how to access and fill out the Free/Reduced Lunch application online.


2.  Family Account:


Each family needs to go online to www.utahsmartlunches.com  and set up an account for all American Prep students in the family. Attachment 2 details how to access and set up the family account online.


3. Order and Payment:


Three days after the family account is set up, a parent may go online to the www.utahsmartlunches.com site and order specific lunches for each student for each day.  The site has a 6-week calendar of lunch entrees from which parents may choose to order for their students. The site will calculate the total cost (eligibility status will be programmed into the site) and parents will be able to pay for ordered lunches with a credit card or through Paypal.


Cancellation of an order must be done by 12:00 pm the preceding day, or in case of student illness, the parent needs to email the vendor to cancel the lunch by 7:00 am the day of service.  Orders and payment will be linked to specific days.  There will not be the option of putting money into an account without selecting specific lunch days.

 

Training will be provided at Parent Orientation Night or by individual appointment for the online ordering system.  Each campus will have a computer available to parents to do their online ordering if they do not have access to a computer at home. If a family prefers to pay with cash or check, then the money and order will need to be submitted to the campus Nutrition Manager BEFORE the day of delivery. 



Timeline: Families who would like their students to be able to order lunch for the first day of school, August 26, will need to utilize the following timeline:

 

        August 12 - August 16:    Step 1: Submit a Free/Reduced Lunch Application

                                                      Step 2: Set up a family account

        August 22 - August 24:    Step 3: Go online to order and pay for lunches

                              August 26:    First day of school


All three steps must be completed by each family prior to ordering school lunches during the 2013/14 school year.  Parents must provide their students with a lunch from home until the process has been completed and they have been notified by their campus Nutrition Manager.


American Prep Academy requires all students to have a nutritious lunch each school day so that they may be able to participate in the demands of learning.  Lunch may be brought from home, or ordered.  There will not be any food at school for students to buy if they forget their lunch.  Parents are responsible for providing lunch each day for their students as part of their acceptance into American Prep 's school system.


We are excited to offer this service to our great American Prep families and look forward to serving you this year!


Sincerely,


Debra Davies, Administrative Director

            ddavies@apamail.org  (801) 839-3613

Kristine Stevens, WV1 Nutrition Manager

            kstevens@apamail.org  (801) 839-3613

Debbie Fowlks, WV2 Nutrition Manager

            dfowlks@apamail.org  (385) 351- 3090

Nikole Torkornoo , D1 Nutrition Manager

            ntorkornoo@apamail.org  (801) 553-8500

Jill Woolley, D2 Nutrition Manager

            jwoolley@apamail.org  (Not Yet Available)

Linda Lane, Liberty Nutrition Manager

            llane@apaliberty.org  (801) 465-4434

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HO I-1.7 SMART LUNCHES ONLINE ORDERING SYSTEM


Attachment 2: Smart Lunches' Online Ordering System

You will find below step-by-step instructions for getting started.

Go to utahsmartlunches.com

Click on the Student tab (top left), then click on Create a new Student.  Select your School.  Select your Student's Grade and teacher from the dropdown box. Enter their first name and last name and click Submit. Your Student has been created.

For families with multiple Students, repeat the above process.

To order lunches, click on the Order tab (top left). Make your selections by clicking on the Entrée name, reviewing the meal description, and then clicking Add to Cart. The Entrée you selected will turn green, indicating it is in your cart. You may also click Add All Similar to add all similar items to your cart.

Families with multiple Students may order for each Student by highlighting each name. The names are listed on the upper left hand side of the screen. You may order and pay for all Students at once. You do not need to log in and out for each Student.

Once you have made your selections and are happy with your order, it's time to pay. Click on the Checkout button, in the bottom right hand corner of your screen. The next screen to appear will show you a summary of which lunches you bought for whom. When you have reviewed your order and are satisfied, click Pay Now. If you review your order and see a change you would like to make, click Make Changes.

After you click Pay Now, you will be sent to a secure checkout page, where you will finish your transaction by entering your credit card information.

You will want to make sure you have your correct email address on file. In the event that you forget your Hot Lunch Account password, your email address is used to ensure your identity in the password resetting process. We do not store a human readable version of your password in our system, so please do not contact Smart Lunches to retrieve your password. Please use the "Forgot my Password" link on the sign-in page to get your password.

Technical Questions: 1-866-529-2064 (toll free) or support@hotlunchonline.com

All orders must be placed or cancelled by noon the day before. We know there are times when your student wakes up sick and misses school and will miss lunch. If you need to cancel a meal for a sick child you will need to send an email by 7:00 am to utahsmartlunches@gmail.com. A credit will then be given to your child's lunch account that you can use for future orders.

No cash refunds.

Menu Questions: 801-906-0768 or utahsmartlunches@gmail.com

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HO I-2.2 APA HEAD INJURY POLICY


American Preparatory Academy

Concussion and Head Injury Policy


American Preparatory Academy has established this protocol to provide education about concussion for coaches, school personnel, parents, and students.  This protocol outlines procedures for staff to follow in identifying, treating, and appropriately referring concussed students.  School policy is specified as to return-to-activity issues following a concussion.


The school's Academic Director shall appoint a School's Administrative Director.  In coordination with Physical Education InstructorsSchool Secretaries, and Academic Director, the School Concussion Specialist shall review this protocol annually.  Any changes or modifications will be provided in writing by July 1st to the school's Academic Director.  The Academic Director will annually ensure that (1) the updates are included in staff policy books, written parent notification, and the school website; (2) all staff and coaches are trained in concussion identification, response procedures and return-to-activity policies; and (3) parents receive, sign and return the "Acknowledgement of Head Injury Policy" form.


Recognition of a Concussion

What is a concussion?  A concussion is type of traumatic brain injury that interferes with normal function of the brain.  It occurs when the brain is rocked back and forth or twisted inside the skull as a result of a blow to the head or body.  What may appear to be only a mild jolt or blow to the head or body can result in a concussion.  A concussion can occur even if a player or student in an activity is not knocked out or loses consciousness.  (NFHS "Suggested Guidelines for Management of Concussion in Sports.")


Common signs (observed by others):

  • Student appears dazed or stunned
  • Confusion
  • Forgets plays
  • Unsure about game, score, opponent
  • Moves clumsily (altered coordination)
  • Balance problems
  • Personality change
  • Responds slowly to questions
  • Forgets events prior to hit
  • Forgets events after the hit
  • Loss of consciousness (any duration)

 

Common Symptoms (reported by student):

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Double vision, blurry vision
  • Sensitive to light or noise
  • Feels sluggish
  • Feels "foggy"
  • Problems concentrating
  • Problems remembering


Management and Referral Guidelines for All Staff


RED ALERT: Any student with a witnessed trauma to the head, back or neck that causes loss of consciousness (LOC), numbness in extremities, or seizure activity.

  • Do not move the student.  Call 9-1-1 or send a student in to the main office to call 9-1-1.  Stay with the student until the School Concussion Specialist arrives.  Designated school personnel must accompany the child until relieved of custodial responsibilities by a parent.


ORANGE ALERT:  Any student who has symptoms of a concussion, and who is not stable (i.e., condition is worsening).  These may include:

  • Deterioration of neurological function
  • Decreasing level of consciousness
  • Decrease or irregularity in respirations
  • Any signs or symptoms of associated injuries, spine or skull fracture, or bleeding
  • Mental status changes: lethargy, difficulty maintaining arousal, confusion or agitation

  • Place the student in a rolling chair and carefully wheel the student to the main office.  Contact parents for immediate transportation to an emergency medical facility.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.


YELLOW ALERT:  Any student who has symptoms of a concussion, and who is stable.

  • Accompany the student to the main office.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.  Notify the parents of the injury and advise them to contact the student's primary care provider or seek care at an emergency medical facility as soon as possible and before the day's end.


BLUE ALERT: Any student with a witnessed trauma to the head but without  concussion symptoms.

  • When in doubt, sit 'em out.  Do not allow the student to participate in physical activities.  Alert the School Concussion Specialist.  Inform parents of the nature and time of the event.  Students with suspected head injuries should not be permitted to drive home.


Concussion Events That Occur Off School Property (Such as Sporting Events or Field Trips)

Respond appropriately based on the above guidelines.  Seek assistance from the host site.  Ensure that other students are supervised for whom you are responsible while you attend to or accompany the injured student.  Promptly notify the school administration.


Return to Play (RTP) Procedures After a Diagnosed Concussion

  1. Return to activity and play is a medical decision. 
  2. Once expert medical clearance has been documented, school personnel will require re-evaluation if concussion symptoms are still evident and will make the final decision regarding resumption of activity.
  3. Once the above criteria are met, the School Concussion Specialist will supervise student progression back to full activity following the step-wise process detailed below. 
  4. Progression is individualized, and will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Factors that may affect the rate of progression include: previous history of concussion, duration and type of symptoms, age of the student, and sport/activity in which the student participates. An athlete/student with a prior history of concussion, one who has had an extended duration of symptoms, or one who is participating in a collision or contact sport may be progressed more slowly.
  5. The student should spend 1 to 2 days at each step before advancing to the next. If post concussion symptoms occur at any step, student must stop the activity and the treating physician must be contacted. Depending upon the specific type and severity of the symptoms, the student may be told to rest for 24 hours and then resume activity at a level one step below where he or she was at when the symptoms occurred. This resumption of activity could be considerably simplified for a student injured during recess compared to a student injured at a game or formal practice.


Step-wise Process for RTP

Step 1.   Complete cognitive rest.  This may include staying home from school or limiting school hours (and studying) for several days.  Activities requiring concentration and attention may worsen symptoms and delay recovery.

Step 2.  Return to school full-time.

Step 3.  Light exercise.  This step cannot begin until the student is no longer having concussion symptoms and is cleared by a physician for further activity.  At this point the athlete may begin walking or riding an exercise bike. No weight lifting.

Step 4.   Running in the gym or on the field.  No helmet or other equipment.

Step 5.  Non-contact training drills in full equipment.  Weight training can begin.

Step 6.   Full contact practice or training.

Step 7.   Play in game.  Must be cleared by physician before returning to play.

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HO I-2.2 APA HEAD INJURY POLICY (SPANISH)

American Preparatory Academy

Política de Contusión Cerebral y Lesión en la Cabeza


American Preparatory Academy ha establecido este manual para instruir a los entrenadores, personal escolar, padres y estudiantes sobre la contusión cerebral. Dicho manual describe los procedimientos que el personal debe seguir para identificar, tratar y referir apropiadamente a los estudiantes con contusión. La política de la escuela, especifica como retornar a las actividades después de una contusión cerebral.


El Director Académico de la escuela designará a un Director Administrativo de la Escuela. En coordinación con los Maestros de Educación Física, Secretarias de la Escuela y el Director Académico, el Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela revisarán anualmente el presente manual. Cualquier cambio o modificación será comunicado por escrito el 1 de julio al Director Académico de la escuela. Quien a su vez, cada año se asegurará de que (1) las actualizaciones estén incluidas en los manuales de políticas del personal, en las notificaciones por escrito a los padres, y en el sitio de Internet de la escuela; (2) que todo el personal y los maestros estén capacitados en como identificar una contusión cerebral, procedimientos de respuesta y las políticas de reintegro a la actividad y (3) que los padres reciban, firmen y regresen el "Acuse de recibo de la Política de Lesión en la Cabeza".


Identificar una Contusión Cerebral
¿Qué es una contusión cerebral? es un tipo de lesión traumática del cerebro que interfiere con la función normal del mismo. Se produce cuando el cerebro se balancea hacia atrás y adelante o se retuerce dentro del cráneo como resultado de un golpe en la cabeza o en el cuerpo. Lo que aparenta ser sólo una sacudida leve; un golpe en la cabeza o el cuerpo puede ocasionar una contusión cerebral. La cual puede ocurrir incluso cuando el jugador o el estudiante esta participando en una actividad y lo noquean o pierde el conocimiento. (NFHS "Suggested Guidelines for Management of Concussion in Sports.")


 

Signos y Síntomas Comunes  (observados por otros):

  • El estudiante tiene un aspecto aturdido o inconsciente
  • Confusión
  • Olvida jugar
  • Duda acerca de su juego, la puntuación, el oponente
  • Se mueve con torpeza (coordinación alterada)
  • Problemas de equilibrio
  • Cambios de personalidad
  • Responde lentamente a las preguntas
  • Se olvida de los acontecimientos antes del golpe
  • Olvida los hechos ocurridos después del golpe
  • Pérdida del conocimiento (cualquier duración)

 

Síntomas más comunes (reportado por el estudiante):

  • Dolor de cabeza
  • Fatiga
  • Náuseas o vómitos
  • Visión doble, visión borrosa
  • Sensibilidad a la luz o al ruido
  • Se siente débil
  • Se siente confundido
  • Problemas de concentración
  • Problemas para recordar

 

Manejo y Criterios para todo el personal

ALERTA ROJA: Cualquier estudiante con un trauma visible en la cabeza, espalda o cuello que ocasione la pérdida del conocimiento (LOC), entumecimiento de las extremidades, o convulsiones.

  • No mueva al estudiante. Llame al 9-1-1 o mande a un estudiante a la oficina principal para que llamen al 9-1-1. Permanezca con el estudiante hasta que el Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela llegue. Personal designado por la escuela debe acompañar al niño(a) hasta que sea relevada(o) de las responsabilidades de custodia por el padre/madre.


ALERTA NARANJA: Cualquier estudiante que presente síntomas de una contusión cerebral, y que no se estabilice (es decir, que la condición este empeorando). Estos pueden incluir:

  • Deterioro de la función neurológica
  • Disminución del nivel de conciencia
  • Disminución o irregularidad en la respiración
  • Cualquier signo o síntoma de lesiones asociadas con fractura de la columna vertebral o cráneo, o sangrado
  • Cambios de estado mental: letargia, dificultad para mantenerse estimulado, confusión o agitación

  • Coloque al estudiante en una silla con ruedas y con mucho cuidado lleve al estudiante a la oficina principal. Póngase en contacto con los padres para el transporte inmediato a un centro médico de emergencias. Alerte al  Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela.


ALERTA AMARILLA: Cualquier estudiante que presente síntomas de una contusión cerebral, y que este estable.

  • Acompañe al estudiante a la oficina principal. Alerte al Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela. Notifique a los padres de la lesión y aconsejarles que se comuniquen con el doctor del estudiante o que  busquen atención en un centro médico de emergencias tan pronto como sea posible y antes de finalizar el día.


ALERTA AZUL: Cualquier estudiante que vean que recibio un golpe en la cabeza pero no presente síntomas de contusión cerebral.

  • En caso de que dude, siéntelo. No permita que el estudiante participe en actividades físicas. Alerte al Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela. Notifique a los padres sobre la naturaleza y la hora de la lesión. Los estudiantes que se tenga sospecha de lesiones en la cabeza no se les debe permitir que manejen a su casa.

 

Contusiones cerebrales que se producen fuera de la escuela (como en eventos deportivos o excursiones)
Responder adecuadamente en base a las normas anteriores. Solicite asistencia del sitio donde se lleva acabo la actividad. Asegúrese de que los otros estudiantes por los cuales usted es responsable, sean supervisados mientras atiende o acompaña al estudiante herido. Notifique inmediatamente a la administración escolar.


Procedimientos para Volver a Jugar (RTP-Return to Play) Después de una Contusión Diagnostica

  1. Volver a retomar una actividad y jugar es una decisión médica.
  2. Una vez que la certificación médica se ha documentado, el personal escolar solicitara re-evaluar al estudiante, si los síntomas de contusión cerebral son todavía evidentes, y tomará la decisión final con respecto a la reanudación a la actividad.
  3. Una vez que los criterios anteriores se cumplan, el Especialista en Contusión Cerebral de la Escuela supervisará los avances del estudiantes para que pueda retronar completamente a la actividad después de seguir paso a paso el proceso que se detalla a continuación.
  4. Los avances se miden individualmente, y se determinará caso por caso. Los factores que pueden afectar dichos avances incluyen: antecedentes de contusión cerebral, duración y tipo de síntomas, la edad del estudiante, y el deporte/actividad en la que el estudiante participe. Un atleta/estudiante con antecedentes de una contusión cerebral; que ha tenido una duración prolongada de los síntomas, o que está participando en un deporte de colisión o de contacto puede tener un progreso más lento.
  5. El estudiante debe pasar de 1 a 2 días en cada paso antes de avanzar al siguiente. Si los síntomas de contusión ocurren en cualquier paso, el estudiante debe interrumpir la actividad y el médico debe ser contactado. Dependiendo del tipo específico y la severidad de los síntomas, se puede mandar al estudiante a reposo durante 24 horas y luego reanudar la actividad a un nivel por debajo de donde él o ella se encontraba cuando se produjeron los síntomas. La reanudación de la actividad podría ser considerablemente simplificada para un estudiante herido durante el recreo en comparación con un estudiante herido en un juego o una práctica formal.


Paso a paso del proceso para RTP
Paso 1. Completar el descanso cognitivo. Esto puede incluir el quedarse en casa o limitar las horas de clase (y

estudiar) por varios días. Las actividades que requieren concentración y atención pueden empeorar los síntomas y demorar la recuperación.

Paso 2. Volver a la escuela a tiempo completo.
Paso 3. Hacer ejercicio ligero. Este paso no puede comenzar hasta que el estudiante ya no tiene síntomas de contusión

cerebral y esta autorizado por un médico a iniciar actividades. En este punto, el atleta puede comenzar a caminar o andar en una bicicleta estática. Sin el levantamiento de pesas.

Paso 4. Correr en el gimnasio o en el campo. No se requiere el uso de un casco o cualquier otro equipo.
Paso 5. Ejercicios de entrenamiento, sin contacto y bien equipado. El entrenamiento con pesas puede comenzar.
Paso 6. Práctica o entrenamiento completo con contacto.
Paso 7. Jugar en el juego. Debe ser autorizado por el médico antes de volver a jugar.

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I-LEGAL REFERENCES

LR I-2.2 HB0204

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nameLR I-2.2 hb0204.pdf
pageLR I-2.2 HB0204

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LR I-2.2 R277-614

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nameLR I-2.2 R277-614.pdf
pageLR I-2.2 R277-614

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LR I-4.5 R227-615-1

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nameR277-615-1.pdf
pageLR I-4.5 R227-615-1

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I-OFFICE FORMS

OF I-1.1 VISION SCREENING NOTIFICATION


Office Use


Date: _________________      Teacher:             ____________________________________       Grade: _______________


Student Name: __________________________________        Right Eye:  20/ _______         Left Eye:  20/ _______ 


Dear Parents,


Today at APA, volunteers assisted our school nurse in performing a simple vision screening on your child.  This is provided as a preliminary service by individuals who are not optical health care professionals.  This is not a definitive diagnosis of your child's vision acuity.  


By way of comparison, to receive a driving license in the state of Utah, one must have vision equal to or better than 20/40 (ie. 20/30 or 20/20).  If your child received an evaluation of 20/50 or more in either eye, we highly recommend you take them to a health care provider to have their eyes professionally examined.  A second form is attached for this purpose.  I

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OF I-2.2 ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HEAD INJURY POLICY


American Preparatory Academy

"ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HEAD INJURY POLICY REVIEW"

PARENT CONSENT FORM Required under Utah Code §26-53-201


I, _______________________________________________ for

PRINT (parent or legal guardian)



________________________________      _________________________________

(student name)                                                      (student name)


_________________________________      _________________________________

(student name)                                                      (student name)

 

have read, understand and agree to abide by the American Preparatory Academy Concussion and Head Injury Policy for the purposes of "sporting events" sponsored by a local education agency (LEA) for the 2016-17 school year located in the "Stay at Home Packet".

Signed ________________________________________    Date _____________________________


Definitions:

1. "Sporting event" means "a game, practice, sports camp, physical education class, competition or tryout." It does not include a lift ticket or a pass issued by a ski resort unless the specific activity is organized, managed, or sponsored by the ski resort.

2. " Local education agency (LEA)" means a public school, a school district or a charter school.


Prepared by the Utah State Office of Education August, 2011

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OF I-2.2 ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HEAD INJURY POLICY (SPANISH)


American Preparatory Academy


"REVISION DE RECONOCIMIENTO DE LA POLÍTICA DE LESIÓN EN LA CABEZA"


FORMA DE CONSENTIMIENTO PARA PADRES requerido en el Código de Utah § 26-53-201

Yo, _______________________________________________________________________ para
(padre, madre o tutor legal)


_________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado


________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado


________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado


_________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado


________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado


________________________________________________

(Nombre del Estudiante)               Grado



he leído, entendido y estoy de acuerdo en acatar la Política de American Preparatory Academy de Conmoción y Lesiones de la Cabeza, efectos de  los "eventos deportivos", patrocinado por una agencia de educación local (LEA).

Firmado ________________________________________ Fecha _____________________________

Definiciones:

  1. "Acontecimiento deportivo" significa "un juego, la práctica, campo de deportes, clases de educación física, la competencia o las eliminatorias." No incluye un boleto o una tarjeta de acceso expedida por una estación de esquí a menos que la actividad específica es organizada, administrada o patrocinados por la estación de esquí.
  2. "Agencia de educación local (LEA)" significa una escuela pública, un distrito escolar o una escuela autónoma (chárter).


Preparado por la Oficina de Educación de Utah Agosto, 2011

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OF I-3.1 OPEN GYM PERMISSION/MEDICAL RELEASE FORM



Student Name:                                                                                    Grade:                                                


Open Gym Location(s):                                                                                                                                  


Dates of Open Gym:                                                                           Time:                                                  

           

Open Gym Permission Form


I, the undersigned, parent or legal guardian of the above-named student, request that the school allow my child to participate in the Open Gym of the American Preparatory Academy.  If for any reason I as the parent or legal guardian of the above named student do not want my child to participate in Open Gym, I understand that I am required to notify my child and tell them not to attend Open Gym.  I understand that there may or may not be a staff member present at any given time during Open Gym and I hereby release and hold harmless the school and any and all of its employees or volunteers from any and all liability for any and all harm arising to my child, and for any loss of property as a result of participating in the Open Gym before, during or after school hours.


Medical Release Form


Please list any health conditions that should be considered in relation to your student participating in Open Gym, including any medications they are taking:

________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________


I, the undersigned, parent or legal guardian of the above-named student, a minor, do hereby appoint all staff members or chaperones designated by American Preparatory Academy for the purpose of authorizing medical emergency treatment under the provisions of the Medical Practice Act should it become imminently necessary.  I understand that it is incumbent upon me as a parent/legal guardian to update school records with current information on this form and the Annual Registration Card in my student(s) permanent file(s).  The phone number(s) below are the best ways to try to reach me:


_______________________________________________________________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature                 Date                            Emergency Phone Number(s)

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OF I-4.2 FERPA


PDF
nameFERPA 2016-2017.pdf
pageOF I-4.2 FERPA

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OF I-4.3 UT LABOR COMMISSION FORM 122


PDF
nameUtah Labor Commission Form 122.pdf
pageOF I-4.3 UT LABOR COMMISSION FORM 122

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OF I-8.1 ISAU PARENT AND STUDENT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT


PDF
nameOF I-8.1 ISAU_Parent and Student Acknowledgment.pdf
pageOF I-8.1 ISAU PARENT AND STUDENT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

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OF I-8.1 ISAU STAFF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT


PDF
nameOF I-8.1 ISAU_Staff Acknowledgment.pdf
pageOF I-8.1 ISAU STAFF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

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I-SUPPORTIVE RESEARCH

SR I-2.2 HEAD INJURY TRAINING


Protection of Athletes with Head Injuries

Utah State Office of Education


Professional Development Resource

  • The following information is provided for parents, administrators, coaches, and supervisors to help ensure safety of participants in sports and physical activities.
  • Information is consistent with the Centers for Disease Control's concussion management system. It is also within the parameters of Utah Law governing the management of head injuries in Utah's public school system.

Importance of Concussion Awareness

There is No such thing as minor head trauma!

  • Concussions occur more often in sports and recreational activities than previously thought.
  • Concussions may result in short term or long term consequences and may even cause death.
  • Training in prevention, recognition and management of concussion is necessary for protection of athletes/participants.

Concussion

  • The Facts
  • Recognition
  • Actions
  • Recovery
  • Management
  • Return to Play

The Facts

  • A concussion is a brain injury.
  • All concussions are serious.
  • Concussions can occur without loss of consciousness.
  • Concussions can occur in any sport or physical activity.
  • Younger brains and female brains are more vulnerable to concussions and have a longer recovery time.
  • Recognition and proper management of concussions when they first occur can help prevent further injury or even death.

Remember!!!

  • If a student is suspected of sustaining a concussion or traumatic brain injury he/she should immediately be removed from a sporting event or activity and evaluated by a qualified health care professional!


Recognizing a Concussion

A coach or supervisor should watch for  the following among active participants:

  • A forceful blow to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head.
  • Any change in a participant's behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.


Symptoms Reported by Athlete/Participant

  • Headache or "pressure in head"
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems and/or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Difficulty paying attention
  • Memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Feelings of something "not being right"


Signs Observed by Coach, Supervisor or Fellow Participants
Athlete/Participant:

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets sports plays
  • Is unsure of game, score or opponent
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows personality/behavior changes
  • Cannot recall events prior to or after collision or fall

Possible Symptoms of Traumatic Head Injury

  • Seizures
  • Irritability
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue

Second Concussions

  • Once an athlete/participant sustains a concussion, he/she is 3-6 times more likely to sustain a second concussion.
  • Second brain impact injuries often cause worse symptoms than the first especially if the initial head injury is not completely resolved.

       

Action When a Concussion Is Suspected

  • Remove the athlete/participant from play
    • Athletes/Participants who exhibit signs or symptoms should not be allowed to return to play.
    • When in doubt, keep the athlete/participant out of play.
  • Have the injured athlete/participant evaluated immediately by a health care professional- do not try to evaluate yourself!
  • Record the following information to assist the health care professional in assessing the athlete/participant:
    • Cause of injury
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Any memory loss following the injury
    • Any seizures following the injury
    • Any previous concussions

Actions Continued
  • Inform parents/guardians about the possible concussion
    • Provide a fact sheet about concussions.
    • Be sure parents understand that child must be seen by a health care professional trained in evaluating for concussion.

Recovery

  • All concussions are different.
  • Concussion treatment should be individualized.
  • Recovery time varies from person to person.

Management

  • A health care professional trained in treatment of concussion should establish the management phase.
  • Cognitive and physical rest until symptoms resolve is the key to concussion management.
  • Any activity that increases blood flow to the brain will cause symptoms and should be avoided.

Activities To Be  Avoided/Restricted 

  • All sports
  • Physical Education
  • Weightlifting
  • Studying, tests, class participation

  • Driving
  • Computer  use
  • Video games
  • Text messaging
  • Carnival rides

 
School Can Delay Recovery


Typical class activities that require thinking and concentration may actually make a concussion worse and delay recovery time.

 
Students Returning to School May Need to:

  • Take rest breaks as needed.
  • Spend fewer hours at school.
  • Be given additional time to complete assignments.
  • Receive help with schoolwork.
  • Reduce time spent reading, writing and on the computer.
  • Be granted early dismissal to avoid crowded hallways.

Return to Play

  • Allow the athlete/participant to return to play only with a written and signed medical clearance from a health professional trained in concussion evaluation and management. 
  • When in doubt, keep them out!
    • It is better to miss one or two games than the entire season.
    • It is better to miss one or two games than to incur life-changing abnormalities.

 
Centers for Disease Control

  • The Centers for Disease Control have developed numerous concussion management resources ranging from handouts to pamphlets to an online training program.  These resources are free and available at:


http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/index.html


Thank you!

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SR I-2.3 OSHA BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS INFO SHEET


PDF
nameSR I-2.3 OSHA Bloodborne pathogens Info Sheet.pdf
pageSR I-2.3 OSHA BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS INFO SHEET

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SR I-4.1 SECURITY CAMERAS

View file
nameSurvellance Camera Memo from Heidi Alder (002) (1).pdf
height250