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G-1.0 ACADEMIC PHILOSOPHY

G-1.1 ACADEMIC PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT

Chapter G - Academics

Part 1.0 Academic Philosophy

Section 1.1 Academic Philosophy Statement


Policy Statement:

Academic Philosophy Statement

Student academic achievement is the primary goal of American Preparatory Academy.  We believe that only when students master fundamentals and are fluent in the basic foundational knowledge of the major disciplines can they move on to effectively express their knowledge and master higher-level skills.

Therefore, the foundation of our instruction will focus on mastery of fundamentals.  We define mastery as the ability to demonstrate knowledge and skills repeatedly and accurately.  This requires repeated instruction in the subject matter, increasing degree of challenge and considerable practice.   As our students master the fundamentals, our instruction focuses on sequential building of conceptual knowledge and promoting independent expression of knowledge.  Finally, our instruction focuses on individual internalization of conceptual knowledge, expressed in extensive written work and verbal presentation, preparing our students for advanced study at the high school level.

These levels of instruction and knowledge attainment follow the classical education model of the Trivium - grammar, logic and rhetoric.  American Preparatory Academy respects this well-founded, proven educational model and uses it in selecting and implementing the school's curriculum.

Our academic policies support our academic mission and philosophy. 

An important and vital component of academic achievement is that of organization of student work.  American Prep students will be given tools and training that will assist them in becoming independent students and in organizing their school work, thus maximizing the potential for them to succeed. 

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G-1.2 COMMITMENT TO INSTRUCTION

Chapter G - Academics

Part 1.0 Academic Philosophy

Section 1.2 Commitment to Instruction


Policy Statement:

Commitment to Instruction

Teachers should focus their energy and preparation on delivery of a quality academic program.  American Prep's curricular program is rigorous and requires that classroom time is carefully planned and that delivery of instruction is consistently executed.  "Bell to bell teaching" implies that teachers fill the instructional period with content learning.  Study halls and extensive independent work periods are not appropriate. 

Therefore, it is vital to the success of our program that classroom time is not spent on non-academic activities.  Class "parties" and "rest time" are not appropriate.  Birthdays should be celebrated at lunchtime.   Class activities that are not academically based must be approved in writing by administration (for example, class auctions).

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G-1.3 ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

Chapter G - Academics

Part 1.0 Academic Philosophy

Section 1.3 Academic Performance Standards


Policy Statement:

Academic Performance Standards

American Prep is a "school of choice" with a rigorous academic program. 

American Prep's academic program comprises three vitally important components: 

  1. the work and effort of the teachers and staff
  2. the work and effort of the students
  3. the support of the parents

Our staff and teachers are trained and well prepared to teach our students.  They are an experienced, well-trained group of professionals who are enthusiastic about their job in assisting your student as they achieve academically, learn and grow.  Most students who attend American Prep are well prepared also, and bring their own enthusiasm and love of learning to school with them each day. 

However, if a teacher is not putting forth sufficient effort to enable the students to achieve mastery in their content area, the administration is committed to rectifying this through staff development, coaching and training.  If the teacher, after the remedies have been implemented, continues to be unsuccessful in working at the level required, they will be dismissed.

Likewise, the students at American Prep bear much responsibility with regard to exerting effort and completing assigned work so that they can benefit fully from the excellent academic programs of American Prep.  We believe that it is the responsibility of the school to provide effective organizational systems, positive motivation, excellent teachers and relevant, interesting curriculum for each student so that they can achieve academic success at American Prep.  We are confident that working together, all students can achieve this success.

We recognize that parental support is key to student achievement.  American Prep parents commit to support the learning process by ensuring their student has time each day for studying, a place at home to study, by checking the learning plans daily, ensuring on-time arrival and minimizing absences, providing healthy food for lunch, and engaging in positive communication to address questions, concerns or provide feedback. 

We recognize that we cannot control student effort, participation, and work or parental participation.  We feel it is our duty to provide all the tools necessary, and do all we can to motivate students to succeed.  Ultimately, we recognize that student effort is controlled by the student and motivated by the parent.  After all we can do, academic success will not be the result if the student and/or parent is unwilling to do their part.

If a student consistently fails to participate in the American Prep academic program, or if their parent fails to honor the Acceptance of Policy, the School Administration may recommend to the Governing Board that the student's priority enrollment be reconsidered.  The Governing Board will hold a meeting with the family to discuss the areas of concern.  Any of the following, and other violations of the Acceptance of Policy or other school policies, may result in a Governing Board hearing:  

  1. Students who fail the academic course of study as a result of lack of effort.
  2. Students who display willful noncompliance as evidenced by failure to turn in consecutive assignments or participate in classwork.
  3. Parents who are unwilling to review and sign the learning plan each day for students, and who fail to ensure their student completes assignments.

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G-2.0 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

G-2.1 SUBJECT AREA GROUPS

Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.1 Subject Area Groups


Policy Statement:

Subject Area Groups 

APA’s academic program utilizes achievement grouping for the instruction of reading, spelling and math in grades 1-6.  The Master Academic spreadsheet is utilized to determine placement of students into the academic level groups.  Students At Risk of academic failure are identified by Intensive results on DIBELS, low SAGE scores in Reading and/or Math, and/or low WIDA scores.  Students At Risk are placed in small achievement groups with our most highly effective classroom teachers during the breakout periods.  This method requires that our students leave their classrooms for possibly three subjects per day. 

The Lesson Progress Chart (LPC) is completed weekly by the classroom teacher.  It carefully tracks student progress at mastering Reading, Spelling, and Math curriculum.  It also notes interventions and accommodations utilized.  The LPC is discussed in weekly team meetings and recommendations made to accelerate the growth of students not making adequate progress.

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G-2.2 HOMEWORK POLICY

Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.2 Homework Policy


Policy Statement:

It is the hope of American Prep that our students will come to love learning and desire to spend free time studying and reading.  To assist our families in developing life-long learners, American Prep has adopted the following policies based upon these principles:

  • Homework is an integral part of the education program at American Prep. It is an extension of the classroom lessons and should directly relate to class work. It reinforces skills and concepts that are taught and helps develop good study skills and habits. It also informs parents of what is being taught in the classroom. Some guidelines for the assignment of homework follow:
  • Homework is assigned with coordination between teachers and consideration of the importance of child participation in family activities and responsibilities.
  • An American Prep student should spend time each day studying, whether or not homework is assigned. If no homework is assigned, students are encouraged to review math facts, work on MathScore, read, practice writing, study spelling words, or read a book with their parents.

Homework Policy - Elementary

  1. Homework is assigned with coordination between teachers and consideration of the importance of child participation in family activities and responsibilities.  Students will be given homework most weekday evenings.  It is our intention that homework given will be appropriate, relevant, interesting and at times, challenging.  Homework assigned should not be new material for students, but should be a review, extra practice, or an extension of material already taught in school.

  2. Students should be able to complete their homework within the time frames below, with the exception of special projects or in cases where the student fails to complete classwork in a timely manner, or if a student falls behind due to tardy arrivals, absences or failure to attend to learning or use time effectively during the school day.  These times do not include music practice or free reading time.  Students in grades 1-4 should read an additional period of time each evening (at least 15 minutes).  In grades 5-6 this time may, but will not always, include free reading time.  Students in advanced math and reading courses may need additional time for homework completion each evening.

      • Kindergarten - 10 minutes

      • First grade - 20 minutes

      • Second grade - 30 minutes

      • Third grade - 40 minutes

      • Fourth grade - 50 minutes

      • Fifth grade - 60 minutes

      • Sixth grade - 60 minutes


 3. An American Prep student should spend time each day studying, whether or not homework is assigned.  If no homework is assigned, students are encouraged to review math facts, work on MathScore, read, practice writing, study spelling words, or read a book with their parents.  We believe it is in the best interest of our students to spend their free time reading, studying, and playing games that are mentally stimulating

  4. If a parent believes the homework assigned is excessive or if their child is not receiving regular homework, they may fill out a "Homework Response Form" (available at the school office) and return it to the teacher.  Administration will review all response forms.


Home Learning Environment

  1. Parents need to provide an environment in the home that will make it possible for students to engage in scholarly pursuits at home on a daily basis.  A successful learning environment contains the following elements:

    1. a quiet place to study and complete assignments;

    2. access to necessary tools (pencils, paper, adequate lighting, resources such as a reference books); and

    3. freedom from distractions (TV, video and computer games, distracting music or conversations).


  2. American Prep recommends that families adopt a "no TV, no Video games" policy Monday through Thursday.  Ample research has demonstrated that it is not beneficial for students to watch TV and play video games on a daily basis.  Lack of physical exercise is resulting in obesity in epidemic proportions in our country.  We encourage our families to provide opportunities for their students to exercise and study during the weekday evenings.


  3. American Prep recommends that families, where possible, establish study time in the early evenings, allowing their students time after school to engage in physical activities.  We encourage families to engage in study time together, possibly at a central location such as the kitchen table.  Parents may sit and study or complete work of their own while students complete their work.  Family study time works well as parents are close by to act as a resource should the student need it, and also to help keep the student focused on studying.  Parents can easily sign the learning plan as assignments are completed.


  4. American Prep recommends that parents review the academic scope and sequence received from their student's teacher, then utilize the public library to have educational resources on hand at home that will serve to extend and expand the student's learning on the subjects they are studying at school.


Homework Policy - Secondary 

  1. Homework is assigned with coordination between teachers and consideration of the importance of child participation in family activities and responsibilities.  Students will be given homework most weekday evenings.  It is our intention that homework given will be appropriate, relevant, interesting and at times, challenging.  Homework assigned should not be new material for students, but should be a review, extra practice, or an extension of material already taught in school.


  2. Secondary students should be able to complete their homework within 90-120 minutes each evening, with the exception of special projects or in cases where the student fails to complete classwork in a timely manner, or if a student falls behind due to tardy arrivals, absences or failure to attend to learning or use time effectively during the school day.  These times do not include music practice or free reading time.    Students in advanced math and reading courses may need additional time for homework completion each evening.


  3. An American Prep student should spend time each day studying, whether or not homework is assigned.  If no homework is assigned, students are encouraged to review core subjects lessons, study for tests, and read independently. We believe it is in the best interest of our students to spend their free time reading, studying, and playing games that are mentally stimulating.


  4. If a parent believes the homework assigned is excessive or if their child is not receiving regular homework, they may fill out a "Homework Response Form" (available at the school office) and return it to the teacher.  Administration will review all response forms.


Home Learning Environment

  1. Parents need to provide an environment in the home that will make it possible for students to engage in scholarly pursuits at home on a daily basis.  A successful learning environment contains the following elements:

    a quiet place to study and complete assignments; access to necessary tools (pencils, paper, adequate lighting, resources such as reference books); and freedom from distractions (TV, video and computer games, distracting music or conversations).


  2. American Prep recommends that families adopt a "no TV, no Video games" policy Monday through Thursday.  Ample research has demonstrated that it is not beneficial for students to watch TV and play video games on a daily basis.  Lack of physical exercise is resulting in obesity in epidemic proportions in our country.  We encourage our families to provide opportunities for their students to exercise and study during the weekday evenings.


  3. American Prep recommends that families, where possible, establish study time in the early evenings, allowing their students time after school to engage in physical activities.  We encourage families to engage in study time together, possibly at a central location such as the kitchen table.  Parents may sit and study or complete work of their own while students complete their work.  Family study time works well as parents are close by to act as a resource should the student need it, and also to help keep the student focused on studying.  Parents can easily sign the learning plan as assignments are completed.


  4. American Prep recommends that parents review the academic scope and sequence received from their student's teacher, then utilize the public library to have educational resources on hand at home that will serve to extend and expand the student's learning on the subjects they are studying at school.

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G-2.3 READING UNIVERSITY

 Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.3 Reading University


Policy Statement:

Reading University

Reading University is the school-wide reading program.  Booklists have been compiled for each grade level at APA and a point system established.  Students will receive a grade for their RU participation each quarter in grades 1-6.  Jr. High /Secondary RU grades are calculated into their English grades.  Teachers should follow the RU guidelines with regard to the number of books required per quarter. Summaries and book reports are part of the Writing program.

Teachers need to express enthusiasm for the RU program by sharing books they are reading from the grade level list on at least a weekly basis.  A place in the classroom should be dedicated to RU so the teacher can easily and frequently reinforce this important program.  Teachers should recommend books via the learning plan frequently and students should be asked to share book responses with the class during lunch time or another appropriate time to help other students get excited about books their peers have read and enjoyed.

Elementary Teachers must identify a RU Winner each month, and submit the name and a short paragraph outlining the student's achievement in RU to the Academic Secretary so awards can be made at the Wednesday assembly.

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G-2.4 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

 Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.4 Classroom Activities


Policy Statement:

Classroom Activities

These two forms are for you to use when you want to do an activity that is outside the normal daily schedule, or show a video in your classroom. Please remember to fill these out well in advance so we can review them and get you the information you need in order to prepare.
 
If you have already talked to me about a video that is part of your 180 day plan, and it has been approved as such, you don't need to get it approved year after year.  This is for anything outside your plan or any new videos you wish to present.  
 
With regard to the activities - this is for elementary culminating activities and Jr. High activities where student or staff schedules may be affected, changed, or if there are any facility needs, or support needs you may have.  Really anything out of your normal daily classroom lessons are what we are hoping to be notified of.  
 
We hope that this will help administration support you in any needs you may have, and also make sure we know what is happening in the school for when we get calls and inquiries from parents and students who want information.  For example, we may get a call from a parent saying "my child has been asked to bring X (food, special clothing, etc) to school on Tuesday and I wondered how much I should prepare"?  If we don't know what is happening, it sounds bad to the parents when we say "we have no idea what you are talking about and cannot be of any help".  Sometimes the student doesn't tell the parent even what class it is for and we can't help.  So we hope you will see we are not trying to make your job harder, just trying to facilitate communication and support you in any way we can.    


Supplemental Material:


Handouts:           HO G-2.4.3 Overnight Activity Information Handout

 

Office Forms:     OF G-2.4 Activity Permission Form

                            OF G-2.4.3 Overnight Notary Form

                            OF G-2.4.3 High School Events Conduct Expectations Form

  

Copy in Staff Manual (No)

Copy in Parent/Student Handbook (No)

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G-2.4.1 CULMINATING ACTIVITIES

Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.4 Classroom Activities

Paragraph 2.4.1 Culminating Activities


Policy Statement:

Major Culminating Activities

Elementary:  Each grade (grades K-6) will host two major culminating activities per year.  These activities will be based upon Core Knowledge curricular subjects.  The grade-level teams will determine the scope of the activities.  Dates for the activities should be given to school administration by the end of each school year for the following year.


Minor Culminating Activities

Elementary: Core Knowledge Units should end with a minor culminating activity, unless they end with a major activity.  Administration should be notified of the date and time of these activities, as should parents via the monthly newsletter.  Information about culminating activities, including resources, special items, contact information for specialists, etc., should be recorded and included in the Academic Guide.  For more information, see Culminating Activity Guide.


Supplemental Materials:

Office Forms: OF G-2.4 Activity Permission Form

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G-2.4.2 DVD USAGE

Chapter G - Academic Programs

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.4 Classroom Activities

Paragraph 2.4.2 DVD Usage


Policy Statement:

DVD Usage

Use of the DVD can be a legitimate educational activity.  Guidelines for DVD use are as follows:

  • DVD should be used when the content contained in the video has already been presented to the students, and they are at some level of mastery with the material
  • DVD usage is used as a culminating activity, a review, or an additional presentation of material
  • Teachers have filled out a DVD request form, submitted it to administration and signed up on the schedule on the cart OR have included the DVD information in the 180 day plan and the plan has been approved by administration, and the teacher has signed up for the DVD player on the cart.


Office Forms: OF G-2.4.2 Video Usage Request Form

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G-2.4.3 FIELD TRIPS

Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.4 Classroom Activities

Paragraph 2.4.3 Field Trips


Policy Statement:

Field Trips

Students will participate in approximately two field trips per year.  Field trips must be closely related to the content covered in history, science, or literature.  Teachers will work as a grade-level team to plan and carry out these field trips.  Parents may be asked to volunteer as chaperones and drivers.  Drivers must have a copy of their driver's license and proof of insurance on file with the school office.  To minimize the impact of field trips on academic group instruction (reading, spelling and math groups), grades 1-3 and 4-6 should schedule their field trips on the same days.  Teachers should plan and schedule field trips by the end of the prior school year and get dates to school administrators for the school calendar.  If possible, field trips should be conducted in the afternoons to avoid group conflicts altogether.

Field trip permission forms and driver release forms can be obtained from administration  (make sure full address of destination is listed on the form).

The budget for field trips can be obtained from the Business Manager.


Supplemental Materials: 

Handouts:          HO G-2.4.3 OVERNIGHT ACTIVITY INFORMATION HANDOUT

 

Office Forms:    OF G-2.4 Activity Permission Form

                            OF G-2.4.3 Overnight Notary Form

                            OF G-2.4.3 High School Events Conduct Expectations Form


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G-2.5 SUMMER PACKETS

Chapter G - Academics

Part 2.0 Academic Programs

Section 2.5 Summer Packets


Policy Statement:

Summer Packets

It has been our policy, and continues to be our policy, that summer reading needs to involve uplifting themes that stimulate students' curiosity of the natural world (building upon their ability to explore nature in the summer); themes that are uplifting and draw their thoughts to possibilities, dreams, aspirations, and encourage them to ponder on how they can change the world for the better (the power of one, etc.).   Books that highlight the positive impact of a person's actions on the world around them are what we are looking for.  It doesn't mean there cant be sadness in a book, but we avoid themes in summer reading that revolve around death and other sad themes that students will be reading on their own with no teacher interaction to assist them in processing a difficult, dark theme.


2nd Grade- The Little Engine that Could

3rd Grade- My Father's Dragon

4th Grade- Robinson Crusoe (the Core Knowledge version that we had in the catalog before)

5th Grade- The Secret Garden

6th Grade- The Cay

7th Grade- The Call of the Wild  (this is a change from last year)

8th Grade- Animal Farm

9th Grade- The Scarlet Pimpernel

10th Grade- Wuthering Heights

11th Grade- The Great Gatsby

12th Grade- (Mr. Sorensen is still working on)


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G-3.0 ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC SUPPORT

G-3.1 SPECIAL EDUCATION

Chapter G - Academics

Part 3.0 Additional Academic Support

Section 3.1 Special Education


Policy Statement:

Special Education

American Preparatory Academy, in providing for the education of students with disabilities enrolled in its school, has in effect policies, procedures, and programs that are consistent with the Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules (USBE SER) as described in this Policies and Procedures Manual. Our special education program includes a complete continuum of services including mainstream classes, special classes, home and hospital and home services.


A. Definitions.

  1. Charter School (Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 Section 5210(1)). (USBE SER I.E.6) A public school that functions as an LEA, unless it is a school of an LEA, that:
    1. Is exempt from significant State or local rules that inhibit the flexible operation and management of public schools, but not from any rules relating to the other requirements of the ESEA;
    2. Is created by a developer as a public school, or is adapted by a developer from an existing public school, and is operated under public supervision and direction;
    3. Operates in pursuit of a specific set of educational objectives determined by the school's developer and agreed to by the authorized public chartering agency;
    4.  Provides a program of elementary or secondary education; or both;
    5. Is nonsectarian in its programs, admissions policies, employment practices, and all other operations, and is not affiliated with a sectarian school or religious institution;
    6. Does not charge tuition;
    7. Complies with the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;
    8. Is a school to which parents choose to send their students, and that admits students on the basis of a lottery, if more students apply for admission than can be accommodated;
    9. Agrees to comply with the same Federal and State audit requirements as do other elementary schools and secondary schools in the State, unless such requirements are specifically waived for the purpose of this program;
    10. Meets all applicable Federal, State, and local health and safety requirements;
    11. Operates in accordance with State law; and
    12. Has a written performance contract with the authorized public chartering agency in the State that includes a description of how student performance will be measured in charter schools pursuant to State assessments that are required of other schools and pursuant to any other assessments mutually agreeable to the authorized public chartering agency and the charter school.
  2. American Preparatory Academy has adopted all of the other applicable definitions as found in USBE SER I.E.1-44.

 B. Budget Information and Categories.

 American Preparatory Academy provides detailed budget information and budget categories in its annual application for IDEA Part B funding submitted to the Utah State Office of Education.


C. Assurances.

Students are admitted to American Preparatory Academy based solely on the lottery and other requirements under the Utah Code and the USBE Administrative Rules for Charter Schools, and without restrictions due to race, color, gender, national origin, disability status, or religion. Assurances with regard to compliance with IDEA Part A and Part B, as well as the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard, and compliance with other Federal laws including "New Restrictions on Lobbying, "Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters," and the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 are submitted annually with the application for IDEA Part B funding to the Utah State Office of Education.


D. General program description.

American Preparatory Academy has two campuses, one in Draper, Utah and one in West Valley City, Utah.  Both buildings are approximately  44,500 square feet with a gymnasium, multipurpose room, administrative offices, 23 classrooms and 9 breakout rooms (for sub-grouping of students). American Preparatory Academies both have 570 students enrolled in grades K-9. The Utah Core Curriculum and Core Knowledge Sequence is the foundation for the curriculum in all grade levels, with basal and supplementary materials used for daily instruction in classrooms.

 American Preparatory Academy was founded by a group of parents all desiring to implement an academic program utilizing research-based practices for maximum student achievement.  Founding members have expertise in many aspects of business, professions and community service.

Other members of the community supported the idea of a charter school that offered a rigorous academic education based on a classical, liberal arts model.  These community members now serve on various school committees and continue to be the foundation upon which we operate our school.

A school program was designed to ensure maximum academic achievement by each student through achievement leveled groups in grades K-6, and through a rigorous requirement in Jr. High for academic courses.  In elementary school, students are placed into achievement-leveled groups for reading, spelling and math and are able to move through the courses as quickly as they are able.  In Jr. High, all students are required to complete 2 years of Latin, and the 9th grade students take 2 periods of language arts daily.  This allows us to ensure our students are well prepared for advanced study at the high school level.

American Preparatory Academy also has a community focus.  Each year, students participate in service opportunities that focus on one of four areas - Service to our School, Service to our Community, Service to our Nation, and Service to our World.  Our school theme is "Builders" and signifies the many ways in which we have the opportunity to "build" in each of these four areas.  A sub theme of our school is "Be the change you wish to see in the world."

The Board of Directors at American Preparatory Academy believes strongly that an annual self-improvement plan is essential to improving upon our education program.  Each year the Board assesses American Preparatory Academy's performance.  Results of academic testing and the Parent Survey are reviewed in detail by the Board each year in order to develop the Annual School Improvement Plan.


E. Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE).

  1. American Preparatory Academy follows the requirements of Charter Schools and Their Students (USBE SER III.O)
    1. Students with disabilities ages 3 through 21 who attend public charter schools and their parents retain all rights under Part B of the IDEA and the USBE SER.

    2. American Preparatory Academy is an LEA that receives funding under Part B, and is responsible for ensuring that all of the requirements of Part B of the IDEA and these Rules are met.

    3. American Preparatory Academy, a public charter school, provides a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to all eligible students with disabilities in conformity with the requirements of the Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules (USBE SER) and the United States Department of Education Final Regulations for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) August 2006.

2. Free appropriate public education (FAPE). (USBE SER I.E.15) Special education and related services that:

Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge;

b. Meet the standards of the USOE and Part B of the IDEA;

c. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school education in Utah; and

d. Are provided in conformity with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) that meets the requirements of Part B of the IDEA and these Rules.


F. Full Educational Opportunity Goal (FEOG).

American Preparatory Academy hereby affirms the goal of providing a full educational opportunity to all students with disabilities determined eligible for special education or special education and related services under the IDEA and the USBE SER, of the ages served by the Charter School between three and 22, and in accordance with all of the timeline requirements of the IDEA with respect to the identification, location, evaluation, and provision of a free appropriate public education.

Our special education program includes a complete continuum of services including mainstream classes, special classes, home and hospital and home services.


IDENTIFICATION, LOCATION, and EVALUATION of STUDENTS SUSPECTED of HAVING DISABILITIES

 A. Child Find. (USBE SER II)

American Preparatory Academy has policies and procedures to ensure that all students with disabilities enrolled in the grades the school serves, including students who are highly mobile, students who have been suspended or expelled from school, students who have not graduated from high school with a regular high school diploma, and those who are suspected of being a student with a disability and are in need of special education or special education and related services even though they are advancing from grade to grade, and regardless of the severity of the disability, and who are in need of special education or special education and related services, are identified, located, evaluated. This includes a practical method for determining which students are currently receiving needed special education or special education and related services

B. Child Find Procedures. 

American Preparatory Academy conducts the following procedures to ensure that students suspected of having a disability are identified and located:

  1. Finding students who have been receiving needed special education or special education and related services.
    1. The enrollment application includes questions about whether a student has received special education or special education and related services in the previous school or educational program.
    2. Parents are asked during registration if the students received any services beyond the regular program in the previous school.
    3. If parents respond in the affirmative, a phone contact is made with the previous school to locate the special education records.
    4. American Preparatory Academy follows all the procedures detailed on the In-State and Out-of-State Transfer Student Checklist of the USOE.

  2. In identifying and locating students who are suspected of having a disability but have not been previously identified or determined eligible for special education or special education and related services, American Preparatory Academy implements the following procedures:
    1. Annual training of all staff on Child Find obligation and how to be alert for observed behavior that suggest a suspected disability.
    2. Notice in student or parent handbook of referral procedures and of the availability of services for eligible students with disabilities.
    3. If a parent or staff member is concerned about a student outside the grade levels of the charter school, the parent or staff member is referred to the district of the student's parent's residence.

C. Referral.

1. Procedure.

 When a parent or staff member suspects a student may have a disability, the following referral procedure is implemented:

a. Teachers implement pre-referral interventions and provide documentation of the results to a Child Management Team, which includes a general education teacher (more description included in the SLD category).

b. Note: Pre-referral interventions may not be used to substantially delay an evaluation for eligibility

c. Referring person completes and signs a referral form. If school personnel are making the referral, attach documentation of contacts with the parents about the concerns regarding the student's educational performance.

d. The referral form is given to the principal, who reviews existing data (including pre-referral intervention results and student study team recommendations) on the student and determines if the referral should go forward for a full evaluation. If it is decided that the evaluation should take place, the principal assigns a staff member to oversee/conduct the evaluation. If the referral is not going to result in a full evaluation, the principal sends the parent a Written Prior Notice of Refusal to take the action of an evaluation.

D. Evaluation

  1. Parental Consent.

    Prior to initiating a full and complete individual evaluation, parental consent is required. The consent informs the parent that the evaluation is being proposed because the student is suspected of having a disability that affects his educational performance and that he/she may be eligible for special education or special education and related services. The consent indicates the areas in which the evaluation team will conduct tests or administer other assessment tools to the student. Consent for evaluation must not be construed as consent for provisions of special education services.

    Reasonable efforts to obtain parental consent are made and documented by the Charter School. American Preparatory Academy follows the requirements of USBE II.C.4 with respect to parents who cannot be located.

    Parental consent is not required before administering a test or other evaluation that is given to all students, or before conducting a review of existing data.

  2. Written Prior Notice.

The parent is given Written Prior Notice that the evaluation will take place. (See Section IV.C of this Policy and Procedures Manual for required components of Written Prior Notice.) Written Prior Notice is embedded in the American Preparatory Academy Consent for Evaluation form.

3. Evaluation Timeline.

When the signed parental consent or refusal of consent for evaluation is received at the school, the school Special Education Director writes the date it was received on the form to document the beginning of the timeline for the evaluation. The Charter School completes all evaluations within 45 school days of receiving the consent. The 45 school day timeline does not apply if the parent fails to produce the student for the evaluation. If the student enrolls in the Charter School after the timeframe has started in a previous LEA, the Charter School must make sufficient progress to ensure prompt compliance in accordance with a written agreement with the parent as to when the evaluation will be completed.

4. Evaluation Process.

a. Review of Existing Data.

When conducting an initial evaluation (when appropriate), the evaluation team considers existing data on the student's educational performance. This may include student records of grades, courses completed, statewide test results, LEA-wide test results, classroom assessments, teacher interviews, observations, notes in the student's cumulative file, and any other information available.

b. Administration of Additional Assessments.

In addition, the special education staff administers assessments in other areas as part of a full and individual initial evaluation, as indicated on the Consent for Evaluation, in order to determine eligibility and the student's educational needs. The test administration follows all of the requirements of the USBER SER II.F-H, including:

    • Use of a variety of assessment tools
    • Use of more than one procedure
    • Use of technically sound instruments
    • Selection of tools that are not discriminatory on a racial or cultural basis
    • Administration in student's native language or mode of communication
    • Use of assessments for the purposes intended and in accordance with the publisher's administration standards
    • Administration by trained and knowledgeable personnel
    • Use of tools assess what they purport to measure and not just the student's disability
    • Assessment in all areas related to the student's suspected disability
    • Comprehensive assessment, not just in areas commonly associated with the specific disability

c. Evaluation Requirements.

Evaluations for students suspected in each of the 13 areas of disability include the requirements for evaluation procedures and assessment of student performance in specific areas identified in USBE SER II.J.1-13..

E. Reevaluation Procedures. (USBE SER II.G)

  1. American Preparatory Academy conducts a reevaluation of each student with a disability when the educational or related services needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, of a student warrant a reevaluation; or if the student's parent or teacher requests a reevaluation.
  2. Parental consent for reevaluations.
    1. American Preparatory Academy obtains informed parental consent prior to conducting any reevaluation of a student with a disability, if the reevaluation includes the administration of additional assessments to the student.
    2. If the parent refuses to consent to the reevaluation, the LEA may, but is not required to, pursue the reevaluation by using the consent override procedures provided in the procedural safeguards, and including mediation or due process procedures.
    3. The reevaluation may be conducted without parental consent if the school can demonstrate that it made reasonable attempts to obtain such consent and the student's parent has failed to respond. A written record of the attempts is maintained in the student's special education file.

F. Additional Requirements for Initial Evaluation and Reevaluation Procedures.  (USBE SER II.H)

  1. As part of any initial evaluation (if appropriate) and as part of any reevaluation, the IEP team and other qualified professionals, as appropriate, must review existing evaluation data on the student. This review may be conducted without a formal meeting. The special education teacher/case manager may review and discuss the existing data with team members and the parent individually. Existing data may include evaluations and information provided by the parents of the student; current classroom-based, local or State assessments, and classroom-based observations; observations by teachers and related services providers; grades; attendance, and other information regarding the student's current educational performance.

  2. The IEP team and appropriate other qualified professionals, based on their data review and input from the student's parents, identifies what additional data, if any, are needed to determine whether the student is or continues to be a student with a disability and the educational needs of the student.

a. The present levels of academic achievement and related developmental needs of the student;

b. Whether the student needs special education and related services; or, in the case of a reevaluation of a student, whether the student continues to need special education and related services; and

c. Whether any additions or modifications to the special education and related services are needed to enable the student to meet the measurable annual goals set out in the IEP of the student and to participate, as appropriate, in the general education curriculum. 

3. If the IEP team and other qualified professionals, as appropriate, determine that no additional data are needed to determine continuing eligibility and student needs, the parents are given Written Prior Notice of that decision and of their right to request additional assessment. The Charter School then prepares a new Evaluation Summary Report, including new and previous data as appropriate, and sends a Notice of meeting for Eligibility Determination. A new Eligibility Determination form is completed and signed by the team, and the parents are given Written Prior Notice of that determination along with a copy of the Evaluation summary Report and the Eligibility Determination documents. Written Prior Notice is embedded in the Eligibility Determination document.

4. If the parent requests additional assessment as part of the reevaluation, American Preparatory Academy conducts assessment in the areas of educational functioning requested.  When the additional assessment is completed, the Charter School then prepares a new Evaluation Summary Report, including new and previous data as appropriate, and sends a Notice of meeting for Eligibility Determination. A new Eligibility Determination form is completed and signed by the team, and the parents are given Written Prior Notice of that determination along with a copy of the Evaluation summary Report and the Eligibility Determination documents. Written Prior Notice is embedded in the Eligibility Determination document.

5. Evaluations before change in eligibility.

a. American Preparatory Academy evaluates students with disabilities before determining that students are no longer eligible for special education or special education related services. However, an evaluation is not required before the termination of a student's eligibility due to graduation from secondary school with a regular diploma.

b. For a student whose eligibility terminates due to graduation from secondary school with a regular high school diploma or due to exceeding the age eligibility for FAPE under State law, American Preparatory Academy provides the student with a summary of the student's academic achievement and functional performance, including recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the student's postsecondary goals.

6. Parental consent is not required before:

a. Reviewing existing data as part of an evaluation or a reevaluation; or

b. Administering a test or other evaluation that is administered to all students unless, before administration of that test or evaluation, consent is required of parents of all students.

G. Evaluation Timelines.

  1. An initial evaluation must be completed within 45 school days of the date the school receives parental consent for the evaluation.

  2. Upon completion of the evaluation or reevaluation, the IEP team and other appropriate professionals determine eligibility within a reasonable time.

  3. A reevaluation:
    1. May not be conducted more than once a year, unless the parent and the LEA agree otherwise; and
    2. Must occur at least once every three (3) years, unless the parent and the LEA agree that a reevaluation is unnecessary.

H. Eligibility Determination.

  1. Notice of Meeting.
    Upon completion of the evaluation, the special education teacher (case manager) arranges a meeting of the eligibility team at a mutually agreeable time and place. A Notice of Meeting will be sent to the parent and other members of the team stating the meeting purposes, time, place, who is expected to be in attendance, and letting the parent know that they may bring others who have knowledge of the student to the meeting.

  2. Evaluation Summary Report.
    The case manager shall have all of the results of the evaluation, and a summary report of the evaluation information in a report. This evaluation summary report is part of the American Preparatory Academy's eligibility document for each disability category.

  3. Eligibility Team Membership.
    The eligibility team shall include a group of qualified professionals and the parent. In the American Preparatory Academy, this may include the special education teachers, regular education teacher, speech-language pathologist, school psychologist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, School Director, School Assistant Director, and others who have conducted parts of the evaluation as appropriate. 

  4. Eligibility Categories, Definitions, and Criteria.
    The American Preparatory Academy has adopted the definitions, evaluation requirements, and eligibility criteria in USBE SER.II.J.1-13.
    1. For the category of Specific Learning Disability, the American Preparatory Academy has selected Method C: Combination of Response To Intervention (RTI) and Discrepancy Methods. When Method C is used, the LEA procedures must include the elements outlined for both Method A and Method B of the Guidelines for SLD. Data from the RTI method would be considered in combination with the confidence level from targeted, norm-referenced assessment, as identified in the ESTIMATOR© manual used with the Discrepancy method. If a student is referred by a parent, staff member or Student Management Team (CMT) (described below) American Preparatory Academy will follow all of the USBE SER for referral and initial evaluation. 

    2. An RTI approach is used for all students in the American Preparatory Academy, and all parents are informed that this is the approach used in reading and math. In addition, parents are informed of the right to request an evaluation for eligibility at any time if they suspect their student has a disability, and of the State's policies regarding the amount and nature of student performance data that is collected and the general education services that are provided. Documentation that parent received this information is in the student's file. Outlined below are the procedures for achievement grouping used in reading.  American Preparatory Academy also creates achievement-based groups for math and uses both interventions and aides, similar to the description below. 

      American Preparatory Academy's current reading program is a research based program that includes a multi-tiered model of service delivery.  Students are achievement grouped across grade levels with instruction targeted to the appropriate instructional level of students within groups.  Each teacher has an instructional aide to assist in providing interventions.  Data from Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) and teacher running records are used to determine placement and movement between groups.  DIBELS progress monitoring is used for students below benchmark. 

    3. If students are not making adequate progress, either based on the grade level expectations or on the amount of progress toward the grade level expectations in one or more of the areas of specific learning disability—oral expression, listening comprehension, written expression, basic reading skills reading fluency skills, reading comprehension, mathematics calculation, and mathematics problem solving--, they are referred to a Child Management Team (CMT) that may include regular education teachers, administration, and a special education teacher.  The CMT uses the data-based decision making process to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.  The CMT team may recommend, based on data presented at the meeting, some further pre-referral interventions including Title I targeted assistance.  Data may include DIBELS, Utah CRTs, classroom assessment, program embedded assessments, and others.

    4. Parents are notified by the teacher frequently when a student is struggling.  Parent notification is given for any student in Title I targeted assistance.  Each parent receives data-based documentation of student progress during instruction. If a student is not making adequate progress after an appropriate period of time, as determined by the CMT, a referral for evaluation is made.

      If at any time in the process of interventions the parent requests special education testing American Preparatory Academy will have a meeting with the parent to determine if American Preparatory Academy should begin evaluation for eligibility for special education. Documentation of the meeting is kept. If the evaluation process is started, all of the requirements and procedures in Section II of this Policy and Procedures Manual are followed.  If it is determined that an evaluation will not be conducted, the parent is given a Written Prior Notice of Refusal to conduct the evaluation.

      Review of progress at each CMT meeting is done on all students referred to the CMT team.  Documentation of all assessments given to the student are kept for all students and shared regularly with the parent, including those students below benchmark and if the student is in special education pre-referral intervention. 

    5. American Preparatory Academy has received and will continue to receive professional development on RTI strategies and procedures.

    6. For an initial evaluation, American Preparatory Academy administers appropriate assessments that meet all the criteria in Section II of this Manual. Often the standardized norm referenced assessment, Woodcock Johnson III achievement and cognitive tests are given. The student must score above the intellectual disability range on a standardized, norm referenced individually administered achievement measure. Data from the assessments are used for input needed for the ESTIMATOR disk.  The ESTIMATOR disk provides data to American Preparatory Academy on the likelihood that there is a severe discrepancy between the student's ability and the student's achievement.  American Preparatory Academy uses this information along with Woodcock Johnson sub-test scores and other existing data, including classroom observations, to determine possible gaps in learning. For scores above the intellectual disability range.

    7. American Preparatory Academy must ensure that the student is observed in the student's learning environment (including the regular classroom setting) to document the student's academic performance and behavior in the areas of difficulty. The team may decide to use information from an observation in routine classroom instruction and monitoring of the student's performance that was done before the student was referred for an evaluation; or have at least one member of the team conduct an observation of the student's academic performance in the regular classroom after the student has been referred for an evaluation and parental consent is obtained.

    8. An eligibility team consisting of parents and qualified professionals including the student's general education teacher, and an individual qualified to conduct individual diagnostic examinations determines whether the student is a student with a Specific Learning Disability by reviewing all data, looking for gaps in learning, why interventions have failed, whether the disability has an adverse effect on educational performance, and if specialized instruction is needed for the student to succeed, in accordance with the eligibility determination requirements of USBE SER II.

    9. Specific documentation for the eligibility determination (303.3II). The team's documentation of the determination of eligibility with a specific learning disability must contain a statement of the  (1) basis for making the determination; (2) the relevant behavior, if any, noted during the observation of the student and the relationship of that behavior to the student's academic functioning; (3) the educationally relevant medical findings, if any; (4) whether student does not achieve adequately for student's age or to meet State-approved grade level standard; and, for the RTI Method selected by American Preparatory Academy, (5) whether the student is not making sufficient progress to meet age or state-approved grade-level standards (RtL). The document must also contain the determination of the team concerning the effects of a visual, hearing or motor disability; intellectual disability; emotional disturbance; cultural factors; environmental or economic disadvantage; or limited English proficiency on the student's achievement level. 

    10. The eligibility team must refer to the USOE Specific Learning Disability Guidelines.

  5. Determining Eligibility. (USBE SER II.)
    1. Using the criteria for each category of disability as described above, the eligibility team shall determine:
      Whether the student has a disability that
      1. Adversely affects his educational performance, and

      2. Whether the student requires special education or special education and related services.

      3. Special education is defined (USBE SER I.E.38) as specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of a student with a disability and may include related services if they meet the definition of special education. Specially designed instruction (USBE SER I.E.38) is adapting, as appropriate to the needs of an eligible student under USBE SER the content methodology or delivery of instruction to address the unique needs of the student that result from the student's disability, and to ensure access of the student to the general curriculum, so that the student can meet educational standards within the jurisdiction of the Charter School that apply to all students.

    2. Disclaimers. (USBE SER) A student must not be determined to be a student with a disability if the determinant factor for that determination is:
      1. Lack of appropriate instruction in reading, including the essential components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency);

      2. Lack of appropriate instruction in math; or

      3. Limited English proficiency. 

    3. The determination of eligibility is documented on the appropriate "Team Evaluation Summary Report and Written Prior Notice of Eligibility Determination" form with signatures of team members.  

    4. If the disability is determined to be a Specific Learning Disability, any team member who disagrees with the rest of the team's decision may put his reasons in writing.

    5. Parents are provided with a copy of the Team Evaluation Summary Report and Written Prior Notice of Eligibility Determination document.

  6.  Evaluations before Change in Eligibility. (USBE SER II.H.6)
    1. The American Preparatory Academy evaluates a student with a disability before determining that the student is no longer an eligible student with a disability.

    2. An evaluation is not required before the termination of a student's eligibility due to graduation from secondary school with a regular high school diploma, or due to exceeding the age of eligibility for FAPE under Utah law.

    3. For a student whose eligibility terminates due to graduation from secondary school with a regular diploma, or due to exceeding the age of eligibility for FAPE under Utah law, an LEA must provide the student with a summary of the student's academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the student's postsecondary goals.

IEP DEVELOPMENT and SERVICE DELIVERY

American Preparatory Academy implements the following policies and procedures to address the IEP requirements of USBE SER III.!-U.

A. IEP Team Meeting

Within 30 calendar days of the determination of eligibility to develop an IEP, the special education teacher/case manager shall arrange a meeting of the IEP team at a place and time that is mutually convenient to the parent and the Charter School. A Notice of Meeting will be sent to the parent and other members of the team stating the purposes, time, place, who is expected to be in attendance, and letting the parent know that the parent or the Charter School may bring others who have knowledge or special expertise about the student to the meeting. The determination of knowledge or expertise of the invited person is made by the party who invited said person.

B. Parental Opportunity to Participate

  1. Parents are expected to be participants along with school team members in developing, review and revising the IEP. This includes providing critical information about needs and strengths of their student, contributing to discussions about the student's needs for special education, determining how the student will be involved and progress in the general curriculum, deciding how the student will participate in the state- and district wide assessments, and what services the LEA will provide and in what settings.

  2. American Preparatory Academy documents in writing its attempts to get parental participation in IEP meetings. If the parent cannot attend, participation by other means such as teleconference may be used. Parents must be given whatever help they need to understand the proceedings of the IEP meetings, such as interpreters. If the Charter School cannot obtain parental participation, it proceeds with the development of the IEP as required by Part B of the IDEA and USBE SER.

C. IEP Team

  1. The team shall consist of the parent, the special education teacher and regular education teacher of the student, a representative of the Charter School, a person who can interpret the results of the evaluation, and the student when appropriate. Other team members may be added when they are likely to provide services to the student. The representative of the Charter School must meet the Charter School administrator standards, have knowledge of the general education curriculum and of the availability of resources of the Charter School.


  2. Meetings with IEP students where plans are being made in their program need 2 staff members and notes need to be taken, signatures if possible, and Sped Director needs to be involved.

D. IEP Team Attendance. (USBE SER III.F)

  1.  A required member of the IEP team is not required to attend all or part of a particular IEP team meeting if the parent of a student with a disability and the Charter School agree, in writing, that the attendance of the member is not necessary because the member's area of the curriculum or related services is not being modified or discussed in the meeting.

  2. A required member of the IEP team may be excused from attending all or part of a particular IEP meeting when the meeting does involve a modification to or discussion of the member's area of the curriculum or related services, if the parent and the LEA consent to the excusal in writing; and the member submits written input into the development of the IEP to the parent and the IEP team, prior to the meeting.

E. IEP Timelines

  1. An IEP is in effect for each identified student with a disability prior to the beginning of the school year.

  2. Each student's IEP is reviewed and revised at least annually. The IEP Team reviews the IEP at least annually to determine whether the annual goals for the student are being achieved. The Team may decide to meet at the request of the parent or other IEP Team member to revise the IEP to address lack of expected progress toward annual goals and lack of progress in the general curriculum, the results of any reevaluation, information about the student provided to or by the parents, the student's anticipated needs, or other matters.

  3. An IEP is developed within 30 calendar days of initial determination that a student is an eligible student with a disability.

  4. Once parental consent for the initial provision of special education or special education and related services is obtained, the special education services, related services, and supplementary aids and services are provided as soon as possible.

F. Transfer Students

 American Preparatory Academy provides a student transferring from another LEA in or out of the state with comparable services to those listed on an existing IEP while it determines next needed steps in accordance with the In-State and Out-of-State Transfer Student Checklist of the USOE.

G. IEP Development and Content

  1. The IEP Team will develop an IEP that is reasonably calculated to confer a free appropriate public education for the student.

  2. In developing the IEP, the IEP team must consider the student's strengths, parental concerns, evaluation results, academic development and functional needs, and special factors.

  3. The IEP must include:
    1. A statement of the student's present level of academic achievement  and functional performance, including baseline data on his achievement and how the student's disability affects his access and progress in the general curriculum for his age or grade level. For preschool student, goals will be based on appropriate activities, unless the Charter School has an established preschool curriculum.

    2. Measurable annual goals and short term objectives based on the present level statement that enable the student to be involved and make progress in the general education curriculum and addressing each of the student's educational needs resulting from the student's disability.

    3. How progress on the goals will be measured and reported to the parents on a periodic basis.

    4. The special education and related services, and the supplementary aids and services, the student needs to address his goals and make progress in the general curriculum. The services are based on peer-reviewed research to the extent practicable.

    5. Program modifications, supports for the students and the teacher in the regular education classroom.

    6. The dates that services, accommodations, and program modifications will begin and end (no more than one year from the date of the IEP); and the frequency, location, and amount of each service listed. Services listed must be specific, such as "reading comprehension," not "resource." 

    7. Consideration of special factors as follows:  
      1. In the case of a student with limited English proficiency, consider the language needs of the student as those needs relate to the student's IEP;

      2. In the case of a student who is blind or visually impaired, provide for instruction in Braille and the use of Braille unless the IEP team determines, after an evaluation of the student's reading and writing skills, needs, and appropriate reading and writing media (including an evaluation of the student's future needs for instruction in Braille or the use of Braille), that instruction in Braille or the use of Braille is not appropriate for the student;

      3. Consider the communication needs of the student, and in the case of a student who is deaf or hard of hearing, consider the student's language and communication needs, opportunities for direct communications with peers and professional personnel in the student's language and communication mode, academic level, and full range of needs, including opportunities for direct instruction in the student's language and communication mode;

      4. Consider whether the student needs assistive technology devices and services; and

      5. In the case of a student whose behavior impedes the student's learning or that of others, consider the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports, and other strategies, to address that behavior.
        1. When making decisions on behavioral interventions, the IEP team must refer to the USOE Special Education Least Restrictive Behavior Interventions (LRBI) Guidelines for information on research-based intervention procedures in order to protect the safety and well-being of students with disabilities, provide protection for students, teachers, other school personnel, the Charter School, and the USOE, and ensure that parents are involved in the consideration and selection of behavior interventions to be used with their students.

        2. When an emergency situation occurs that requires the immediate use of moderately or highly intrusive interventions to protect the student or others from harm, the staff shall complete and submit the emergency contact information to the Charter School director or principal and notify the student's parents within 24 hours. If a behavior requiring emergency procedures occurs more than once per week, two times per month or four times in a year, it is a pattern that must be addressed in the IEP and/or a behavior intervention plan

        3. American Preparatory Academy ensures that all appropriate staff members receive the training necessary to effectively implement a continuum of behavioral interventions and supports.

        4. American Preparatory Academy has established an LRBI Committee to monitor its policies for disciplinary plans, actions and behavioral intervention procedures, protections and safeguards. This committee reviews the use of highly intrusive interventions as well as the effectiveness of and need for additional staff training. The committee is composed of a school administrator, a parent, and two other members of the professional staff.

        5. As appropriate, the student should receive a functional behavioral assessment and behavior intervention services and modifications that are designed to address the behavior.

    8. If the IEP team in considering the special factors described above decides that a student needs a particular device or services for educational purposes, which could be an intervention, accommodation, or other program modification in order to receive a FAPE, the team must include these in the IEP.

    9. How the student will participate in LEA-wide and statewide assessments. While every student with a disability must participate, an individual student may be determined to participate with some accommodations based on his disability, with modifications. Students who have the most significant cognitive disabilities, and meet other criteria in the participation document of the USOE, may be assessed with Utah's Alternate Assessment (UAA). The IEP team must indicate this on the IEP Assessment Addendum, along with the reason that the student cannot otherwise participate in the statewide assessment program.

    10. In addition to the required elements of the statewide assessment program, American Preparatory Academy administers the following schoolwide assessments: DIBELS in grades K-6, SAT annually in grades K-9, and Core Knowledge Assessment in grades K-5. All students, including students with identified disabilities, are included in these assessments. Students with disabilities may participate in the assessments with appropriate accommodations and modifications as determined by the IEP team and documented in the student's IEP. Alternate assessments for individual students, as determined by the student's IEP team and documented in the student's IEP, are provided for students who cannot participate in the schoolwide assessment in any other way.

    11. How the student will participate in physical education services, specially designed if necessary.

    12. Each IEP team must determine whether the student will need Extended School Year (ESY) services in order to receive a free appropriate public education.
      1. This determination in the American Preparatory Academy will be based on regression and recoupment data collected over at least two breaks in the school year consisting of 4 or more week days when there is no school.

      2. If the student's recovery from measured regression on pinpointed skills directly related to the IEP goals is so long that he would not receive FAPE without services during the summer break, the IEP team must find him eligible for ESY services.

      3. The IEP team shall develop a written document that indicates which IEP goals the student will work on during the ESY, what services will be provided, how long and how often the ESY services will be provided, and the setting(s) in which the services will be provided.

    13. Assistive Technology. American Preparatory Academy makes assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, available to a student with a disability if required as part of the student special education, related service, or supplemental aids and services. School-purchased assistive technology devices may be used in the student's home, if the IEP Team determines, on a case-by-case basis, that assistive technology in the home is required for the student to receive a FAPE.

H. IEP Team Access to IEP Information

  1. The American Preparatory Academy makes the student's IEP accessible to each regular education teacher, special education teacher, related service provider, and other service provider who is responsible for its implementation. Each teacher and provider is informed of his or her specific responsibilities related to the implementation of the students IEP and the specific accommodations, modifications, and supports that must be provided for the student in accordance with the IEP.

  2. American Preparatory Academy prepares a summary of the Present Level of Educational Performance, Goals, Services, and Program Modifications and Supports for each teacher of the student. This summary is provided to the teacher prior to the time of initial implementation of the IEP as well as annual updates as appropriate.


I. Placement in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). (USBE SER III.P)

  1. Placement decisions are made by a group of persons, including the parents and take into consideration other knowledge about he student, the meaning of the evaluation data, and the placement option. This group may be the IEP Team, including the parent. The group determines the placement on the continuum of placement options where the student will receive special education or special education and related services.

  2. American Preparatory Academy ensures that the parent of each student be members of any group that makes decisions on the education placement of their student. If unable to get the parents to participate, after repeated and documented attempts, the team may need to proceed with a placement decision. However, no initial placement and provision of services may be put in place without written parental consent.

  3. Placement is determined at least annually, based on the student's present levels of performance, goals, services, and program modifications as detailed in the IEP.

  4. Identified students with disabilities shall receive the special education or special education and related services in the Least Restrictive Environment to the maximum extent appropriate to meet his needs. This means that the student will not be removed from the regular education classroom, with regular education peers, unless the IEP team determines that due to the nature and severity of the disability, the student's educational needs cannot be addressed satisfactorily in the regular education environment, even with the use of supplementary aids and services.

  5. The American Preparatory Academy provides the IDEA required range of placement options, including placement in the regular education classroom, with or without itinerant services; placement in a special class; placement in a special school; placement in a residential program, and homebound or hospitalized placement.

  6. American Preparatory Academy provides supplementary services, such as resource or itinerant instruction, in conjunction with placement in the regular education classroom.


J. Nonacademic Settings, Activities, and Services. (USBE SER III.U-V)

  1. The American Preparatory Academy ensures that each student with a disability participates with non-disabled students in the extracurricular services and activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student's needs. This includes meals, recess periods, counseling services, athletics, transportation, health services, recreational activities, special interest groups or clubs sponsored by the school, referrals to agencies that provide assistance to individuals with disabilities and employment of students, and other activities and services of the Charter School.

  2. American Preparatory Academy ensures that each student with a disability has the supplementary aids and services determined by the student's IEP Team to provide the nonacademic and extracurricular services and activities in such a way that students with disabilities are given an equal opportunity to participate.

K. Parental Consent for Initial Placement and Provision of Services. (USBE SER III.T)

  1. In order for the IEP to be implemented and the special education services to be provided which the team has decided on, written parental consent must be obtained. If the parent refuses consent for the provision of said services, the LEA may not implement the IEP and may not access due process procedures.

  2. American Preparatory Academy does not use a parent's refusal to consent to one service or activity to deny the parent or student any other service, benefit, or activity of the Charter School, or to fail to provide a student with a FAPE.

L. Documentation of Participation.

  1. All members of the IEP team will sign the IEP document indicating that they participated in the development of the IEP. A parent's signature on the IEP does not mean that the parent is in full agreement with the content of the IEP and does not abrogate the parental right to access the Procedural Safeguards of the IDEA.

  2. If the Charter School, despite at least two documented attempts, is unsuccessful in having parental attendance at the meeting, the rest of the IEP team shall proceed with the meeting.

  3. Parents may participate via telephone conference or video conference.

  4. Parents will be provided with a copy of the completed IEP, and Written Prior Notice of the Charter School's intent to implement the program and services in the IEP. This Notice is embedded in the IEP form.  . If the Charter School refuses to include in its offer of FAPE as detailed on the IEP services or program modifications the parent has requested, a Written Prior Notice of that refusal is provided to the parent.


M. Changes to the IEP.

  1. Changes to the IEP may be made at the request of any member of the IEP team in a meeting or by amendment to the existing IEP.

  2. Changes may be needed if there is new information about the student's  performance.

  3. Amendments to the IEP without a team meeting may be made only with the agreement of the Charter School and the parent.

a. Amendments such as a change in the amount of a special education or related service that is no more than 30 minutes per week, a change of location that is no more than 60 minutes per week, or a goal change that is the next logical step forward or backwards, based on the student's progress may be made without a team meeting.

b. If the change involves a move on the continuum of placement options, or the amount of services to be changed is more than indicated above, or a service is to be added, a team meeting will be held with written prior notice to the parent and a notice of meeting to all team members.

c. The parent will be provided with a copy of the amended IEP with Written Prior Notice that these additional actions are going to be taken.

N. Transition from Part C to Part B.

American Preparatory Academy does not currently include pre-school, however, if in the future it provides preschool, the following policies and procedures will apply:

  1. For students ages 3-5, the American Preparatory Academy follows these policies and procedures:
    1. Every eligible student has an IEP developed and being implemented by the student's third birthday;

    2. If a student's third birthday occurs after the end of the school year, the student's IEP team determines the date in the next school year when services under the IEP will begin, unless the IEP team determines that Extended School Year services are needed; and

    3. A representative of the Charter School participates in transition planning conferences arranged by the designated lead agency for Part C.

    4. In developing the IEP for a student with a disability ages 3 through 5 or, at the discretion of the LEA, a two-year-old student with a disability who will turn age 3 during the school year, the IEP team must consider the contents of the Part C Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP).

    5. In the case of a student who was previously served under Part C of the IDEA, the parent may request that an invitation to the initial IEP meeting be sent to the Part C service coordinator or other representatives of the Part C system to assist with the smooth transition of services. Upon such request, American Preparatory Academy shall provide the Notice of Meeting to the Part C representative.

O. Transition from School to Post-School Settings. (USBE SER VII)

American Preparatory Academy does not currently include high school, but does include Grade 9, which is considered by some districts to be High School.  Additionally, if American Preparatory Academy includes a High School in the future, the following Policies and Procedures will apply:

  1. For a student with a disability beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the student turns 16 (such as in an IEP meeting conducted when the student is 15 years old), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, the Notice of Meeting indicates that a purpose of the meeting is the consideration of the postsecondary goals and transition services for the student, that the LEA will invite the student, and identifies any other agency that will be invited, with the consent of the parents or student age 18 or older, to send a representative.
    1. If the student does not attend the IEP meeting, the LEA must take other steps to ensure that the student's preferences and interests are considered.

  2. Transition services. Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the student turns 16 (such as in an IEP meeting conducted when the student is 15 years old), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually thereafter, the IEP includes:
    1. Appropriate measurable postsecondary goals, including academic  and functional goals, based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training or education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills;

    2. The transition services, including courses of study, needed to assist the student in reaching the student's post-secondary goals.

  3. Transfer of rights at age of majority.
    1. Beginning not later than one year before the student reaches the age of majority (age 18), the IEP must include a statement that the student and the student's parents have been informed of the student's rights under Part B of the IDEA that will transfer to the student on reaching the age of majority (except for a student with a disability who has been determined to be incompetent by a court). These rights include:
      1. An adult student has the right to approve his or her own educational placement and Individualized Education Program (IEP) without help from parents, family, or special advocates.

      2. An adult student has the right to allow parents, family, or special advocates to help if he/she desires.

    2. The LEA provides any notice required by Part B of the IDEA and these Rules to both the student and the parents.

    3. All rights accorded to parents under Part B of the IDEA transfer to the student.

    4. All rights accorded to parents under Part B of the IDEA transfer to students who are incarcerated in an adult or juvenile, State or local correctional institution.

P.  Graduation. (USBE VII.C)

  1. American Preparatory Academy is not obligated to make FAPE available to all students with disabilities who have graduated from high school with a regular high school diploma.
    1. The exception above does not apply to students that have graduated from high school but have not been awarded a regular high school diploma, even if they have received an alternative degree that is not fully aligned with the State's academic standards, such as a certificate of completion or a general educational development credential (GED).

    2. Graduation from high school with a regular high school diploma is a change in placement, requiring Written Prior Notice, containing all the requirements of WPN, and is given a reasonable time before the Charter School proposes to terminate the student's eligibility under the IDEA by issuing the student a diploma.
  2. The IEP Team may amend graduation requirements and must document in the IEP the nature and extent of any modifications, substitutions, and/or exemptions made to accommodate the needs of a student with disabilities.
  3. The IEP teams at the American Preparatory Academy refer to the USOE Special Education Graduation Guidelines for additional information. 

Q. Least Restrictive Behavior Interventions (LRBI)

            American Preparatory Academy follows all parts of the USOE LRBI Guidelines as written. The American Preparatory Academy also implements the following procedures:

  1. Emergency situations: In an emergency situation, school staff may need to intervene using a moderate to intensive (highly intrusive) intervention to ensure the safety of students and staff.  If this occurs, a report will be made to the School Director within 24 hours.

    Emergency Situations Definitions:
    • Danger to others:  Physical violence/aggression toward others with sufficient force to cause bodily harm
    • Danger to self:  Self-abuse of sufficient force to cause bodily harm
    • Severe destruction of property:  Severe destruction or physical abuse of property resulting in substantial monetary loss
    • Threatened abuse toward others, self, or property:  Substantial evidence of past threats leading to any of the behaviors defined as danger to others, danger to self, or severe destruction of property

  2. Pattern of behavior:
    If a behavior requiring emergency procedures occurs more than:
    • Once per week
    • Two times in a month
    • Four times in a year

The behavior should no longer be considered an emergency or crisis and should be addressed in the IEP and/or BIP. Additionally, the allowable instances of a behavior requiring emergency procedures are cumulative in number, regardless of whether a different highly intrusive individual intervention is used.

3. Appeals process:

Recommended Appeals Timeline

    • If a member of the IEP team disagrees with a decision regarding behavioral intervention, an appeal must be made in writing to the local Special Education Director or designee.
    • Within 5 days of appeal receipt, the local human rights committee chairperson (School Director) should initiate steps to conduct an appeal conference to resolve differences and, if possible, avoid a hearing.
    • During the pendency of an appeal to the Committee, the behavioral intervention in question should not be implemented.
    • The appeal conference should be completed within 15 school days, and steps should be taken to avoid an adversarial atmosphere. The local Special Education Director can grant an extension of up to five school days if extenuating circumstances are present.
    • The committee's recommendations should not conflict with state or federal law.
    • A copy of the written recommendation should be mailed to each party within five school days following the conference.

    4. Provisions for staff training:

Staff will be provided training annually regarding the definition of an emergency situation and the line of authority in a situation deemed an emergency. 

5. Procedures for monitoring LRBI policies:

The Special Education Director and School Director will monitor the implementation of LRBI policies.  LRBI policies and procedures will be reviewed regularly as part of the monthly SERT meetings.

R. Private School Placements by American Preparatory Academy. (USBE SER VI.A)

Before American Preparatory Academy places a student with a disability, or refers a student with a disability to a private school or facility, or a public or private residential program in order to provide a FAPE to the student, it initiates and conducts meeting to develop an IEP for the student, with a representative of the private school in attendance.  The costs of such placements, including non-medical care and room and board, are at no cost to the parents.

S. Students with Disabilities Enrolled by their Parents in Private schools When FAPE is at Issue (USBE SER VI.C)

  1. If the parents of a student with a disability who had previously received special education or special education and related services from American Preparatory Academy enroll the student in a private school without the consent of or referral by the school, the American Preparatory Academy is not required to pay for the cost of that placement if the school made a FAPE available to the student. Disagreements between the parents and the American Preparatory Academy regarding the availability of a program appropriate for the student and the question of financial reimbursement are subject to the State complaint and due process complaint procedures in USBE SER IV.G-V. The American Preparatory Academy follows other requirements in USBE SER VI.C as written.

  2. If an IEP student withdraws, the SPED Director must meet with parents, notes need to be taken and signatures on withdrawal form need to indicate the correct situation.

PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS

The American Preparatory Academy, consistent with the requirements of Part B of the IDEA and the USBE Special Education Rules, has established, maintains, and implements Procedural Safeguards for students with disabilities and their parents.

A. Opportunity for Parental Participation in Meetings.

 The American Preparatory Academy affords parents the opportunity to participate in all decisions related to the location, identification, evaluation, and provision of FAPE, including decisions related to the Discipline requirements of Part B of the IDEA. This includes arranging meetings at a mutually convenient time and place, providing appropriate Notice of Meeting and making at least two documented attempts to obtain parent participation in meetings.

B. Independent Educational Evaluation. (USBE SER IV.C)

  1. Independent educational evaluation means an evaluation conducted by a qualified examiner who is not employed by the Charter School responsible for the education of the student in question.

  2. American Preparatory Academy has established and implements the following policies and procedures related to independent educational evaluation that meet the requirements of Part B of the IDEA and the USBE SER.
    1. The parents of a student with a disability have the right to obtain an independent educational evaluation of the student at public expense if they disagree with an evaluation obtained by the Charter School.

    2. The Charter School provides to parents, upon request for an independent educational evaluation, information about where an independent educational evaluation may be obtained, and the Charter School's criteria applicable for independent educational evaluations. American Preparatory Academy has available a list of persons and/or agencies where an IEE may be obtained by the parent. In addition, the American Preparatory Academy considers any other evaluator or agency proposed by the parent to conduct the Independent educational evaluation if the examiner and the evaluation meet the Charter School's criteria. A qualified examiner is one who meets the USOE criteria for qualified personnel as a special education teacher, school psychologist, psychologist with expertise in administration and analysis of assessments, or other equivalent qualifications as determined by the Charter School. Criteria for the evaluation are that the evaluation procedures meet all of the same standards as those listed in Section II.D-H of this Policy and Procedures Manual.  The American Preparatory Academy either pays for the full cost of the evaluation or ensures that the evaluation is otherwise provided at no cost to the parent.     
    3. The American Preparatory Academy ensures that when a parent requests an IEE, either the Charter School files a due process complaint to request a hearing to show that its evaluation is appropriate, or that the independent educational evaluation is provided at public expense, unless the evaluation obtained by the parent does not meet the Charter School criteria as described above.  If a due process complaint decision finds the Charter School evaluation was appropriate, an IEE obtained by the parent is considered by the team, but is not provided at public expense.

  3. Additional protections for the parent of a student with a disability and for the Charter School are followed as written in USBE SER IV.C.3(c-h). 
    An independent educational evaluation conducted at the Charter School's expense becomes the property of the Charter School, in its entirety.

C. Written Prior Notice.

 American Preparatory Academy provides Written Prior Notice to parents a reasonable time before it proposes to initiate or change, or refuses to initiate or change,  the identification, evaluation, or provision of a free appropriate public education to the student. The notice includes: a description of the action proposed or refused, an explanation of reasons for the proposal or refusal, a description of evaluations or other information the proposal or refusal is based on, a statement that the parents and eligible student have protection under the Procedural Safeguards and how to obtain a copy of the Safeguards, sources of assistance to understand Part B of the IDEA, a description of other options the IEP Team considered and why other options were rejected, and a description of other relevant factors to the proposal or refusal. The Written Prior Notice is provided in understandable language and in the parents' native language or other mode of communication.

D. Procedural Safeguards Notice.

 A copy of the Procedural Safeguards is given to the parent once a year at the annual IEP review, except that a copy also is given to the parent upon initial referral or parental request for evaluation, upon receipt of the first State complaint or due process complaint in that school year, and upon request by the parent at any time. American Preparatory Academy uses the USOE Procedural Safeguards notice that is posted on the USOE website, www.schools.utah.gov.   The special education teacher/case manager provides a brief explanation of the main provisions of the Procedural Safeguards to the parents at consent for evaluation, eligibility determination, and annual IEP meetings.

This notice contains an explanation of the procedural safeguards related to independent educational evaluations, written prior notice, parental consent, access to educational records, opportunity to present an resolve complaints through State complaint or due process complaint procedures, opportunity for the Charter School to resolve the complaint, availability of mediation, student's placement during pendency of hearings, procedures for students placed in an interim alternative educational setting, requirements for unilateral placement of student in private schools at public expose, hearings on due process complaints, civil actions, attorney's fees. This notice is in langue understandable to the parents.

E. Parental Consent.

 Informed written parental consent is obtained for evaluation and reevaluation, initial placement/provision of special education, and for release of records to certain parties. Efforts to obtain consent are documented in writing.  No student receives special education or special education and related service without the signed initial consent for placement in the student file. Other relevant parental consent requirements are addressed in Sections II and III of this Policies and Procedures Manual.

F. Dispute Resolution.

The American Preparatory Academy follows the Dispute Resolution requirements of the USBE SER described in IV.G-U as written. These include the procedures for State Complaints, Mediation, Due Process Complaints, Resolution Process, Due Process Hearings, Civil Actions, Attorney's Fees, and Student's Status during Proceedings.

G. Surrogate Parents.

The American Preparatory Academy assigns a surrogate parent for a student when the parent cannot be identified or cannot be located, the parent's rights to make educational decisions has been taken away by a court, the student is a ward of the state, or the student is an unaccompanied homeless youth. The surrogate parent meets the requirements of USBE SER IV.V.5-8. American Preparatory Academy contacts the USOE for assistance in obtaining names of trained surrogates, and maintains a list of surrogate parents who are available when needed.

H. Transfer of Rights.

When a student reaches age 18, the age of majority in Utah, and has not been determined incompetent under State law, all rights accorded to parents under Part B of the IDEA and USBE SER transfer to the student. The American Preparatory Academy provides written notice of this transfer of rights at least one year prior to the student's 18th birthday.

I. Confidentiality of Information. (USBE SER IV.X)

The American Preparatory Academy takes appropriate steps to ensure the protection of the confidentiality of any personally identifiable data, information, and records it collects or maintains related to Part B of the IDEA.

  1. Definitions.  As used in these safeguards:
    1. Destruction means physical destruction or removal of personal identifiers from information so that the information is no longer personally identifiable.

    2. Education records means the type of records covered under the definition of ''education records'' in 34 CFR 99, implementing regulations for the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, 20 USC 1232g (FERPA).

    3. Participating agency means any agency or institution that collects, maintains, or uses personally identifiable information, or from which information is obtained, under Part B of the IDEA.

  2. Access rights.
    1. American Preparatory Academy permits parents to inspect and review any education records relating to their student that are collected, maintained, or used by the Charter School. American Preparatory Academy complies with a request without unnecessary delay and before any meeting regarding an IEP, or any hearing, or resolution session, and in no case more than 45 calendar days after the request has been made.

    2. The right to inspect and review education records includes the right to:

      1. A response from the Charter School to reasonable requests for explanations and interpretations of the records;

      2. Request that the Charter School provide copies of the records containing the information if failure to provide those copies would effectively prevent the parent from exercising the right to inspect and review the records; and

      3. Have a representative of the parent inspect and review the records.

    3. American Preparatory Academy may presume that the parent has authority to inspect and review records relating to his or her student unless the school has been advised that the parent does not have the authority under applicable State law governing such matters as guardianship, separation, and divorce.

  3. Record of access.
    American Preparatory Academy keeps a record of parties obtaining access to education records collected, maintained, or used under Part B of the IDEA (except access by parents and authorized employees of the Charter School) in each student's special education file, including the name of the party, the date access was given, and the purpose for which the party is authorized to use the records. If any education record includes information on more than one student, American Preparatory Academy ensures that the parents of a student has the right to inspect and review only the information relating to their student or to be informed of that specific information. List of types and locations of information.

  4. List of types and locations of information.
    On request, American Preparatory Academy provides parents with a list of the types and locations of education records collected, maintained, or used by the Charter School. This list is maintained in the office at American Preparatory Academy/

  5. Fees.
    American Preparatory Academy may charge a fee for copies of records that are made for parents under Part B of the IDEA if the fee does not effectively prevent the parents from exercising their right to inspect and review those records; however, it may not charge a fee to search for or to retrieve information under Part B of the IDEA.

  6. Amendment of records at parent's request.
    1. A parent who believes that information in the education records collected, maintained, or used under Part B of the IDEA is inaccurate or misleading or violates the privacy or other rights of the student may request the Charter School that maintains the information to amend the information. The Charter School must decide whether to amend the information within a reasonable period of time of receipt of the request. If the Charter School decides to refuse to amend the information, it must inform the parent of the refusal and advise the parent of the right to a hearing on the matter.

    2. The Charter School, on request, provides an opportunity for a hearing to challenge information in education records to ensure that it is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student. If, as a result of the hearing, the Charter School decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student, it must amend the information accordingly and so inform the parent in writing.

      If, as a result of the hearing, the Charter School decides that the information is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student, it must inform the parent of the right to place in the records it maintains on the student a statement commenting on the information or setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the Charter School. Any explanation placed in the records of the student under this section must be maintained by the Charter School as part of the records of the student as long as the record or contested portion is maintained; and if the records of the student or the contested portion is disclosed by the Charter School to any party, the explanation must also be disclosed to the party. American Preparatory Academy follows the hearing procedures described in USBE SER IV.12 as written.

  7. Release and disclosure of records.
    Parental consent is not required  for disclosure of records to officials of agencies collecting or using information under the requirements of Part B of the IDEA, to other school officials, including teachers within the school who have been determined by the Charter School to have legitimate educational interests, to officials of another school or school site in which the student seeks or intends to enroll, or for disclosures addressed in referral to and action by law enforcement and judicial authorities, for which parental consent is not required by 34 CFR 99,

    (All Utah Local Education Agencies (LEAs) include in the annual Procedural Safeguards notice that it is their policy to forward educational records of a student with disabilities without parental consent or notice to officials of another school or school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.) Written parental consent is obtained prior to releasing any records to any other person or agency not listed above.  

  8. Safeguards.
    1. American Preparatory Academy protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information at collection, storage, disclosure, and destruction stages.

    2. The School Director of American Preparatory Academy assumes responsibility for ensuring the confidentiality of any personally identifiable information.

    3. Staff members at American Preparatory Academy who collect or use personally identifiable information receive training or instruction regarding the State's policies and procedures in USBE SER IV.X and 34 CFR 99 on an annual basis.

    4. American Preparatory Academy maintains, for public inspection, a current listing of the names and positions of those employees within the school who may have access to personally identifiable information on students with disabilities. This list is posted on the cabinet in which students' special education files are maintained and updated annually.

  9. Destruction of information.
    The American Preparatory Academy informs parents or the student age 18 or older when personally identifiable information collected, maintained, or used under Part B of the IDEA is no longer needed to provide educational services to the student. Information no longer needed must be destroyed at the request of the parents or student age 18 or older. However, a permanent record of a student's name, address, and phone number, his or her grades, attendance record, classes attended, grade level completed, and year completed may be maintained without time limitation. Each student's records may be considered "no longer needed to provide educational services" and may be destroyed three (3) years after the student graduates or three (3) years after the student turns 22.

  10. Students' rights.
    The rights of privacy afforded to parents are transferred to the student who reaches the age of 18, providing the student has not been declared incompetent by a court order, including the rights with regard to education records.

J. Discipline.

The American Preparatory Academy follows the Discipline requirements and procedures described in USBE SER V.A-K as written.

LEA ELIGIBILITY and RESPONSIBILITIES

A. Participation in assessments and reporting of assessment results.

All students enrolled in the American Preparatory Academy, including students with disabilities, participate in the statewide testing program and the school-wide testing program. Participation requirements in the "Participation Guide" are followed. IEP teams determine how students with disabilities will participate, and accommodations needed, if any. Results of statewide assessments are posted on the USOE website annually.

B. Public participation in policies and procedures development.

This Policy and procedures Manual, as well as any future changes to the contents, are presented to the American Preparatory Academy Board in a public meeting for review and input.  The agenda for American Preparatory Academy board meetings is posted at least 1 day prior to each meeting as required by state law.

C. Public posting of USOE monitoring results.

Results of monitoring from the Utah Program Improvement Planning System are posted on the USOE website annually.

D. Methods of ensuring services.

The American Preparatory Academy ensures that each eligible student with a disability enrolled in the school receives the services included in the IEP through a systematic process of review of IEPs and monitoring of service delivery by Charter School personnel and contracted service providers.

E. Supervision.

All personnel of the American Preparatory Academy are supervised by appropriately qualified staff as determined by the local Charter School Board. 

F. Use of Part B funds.

The American Preparatory Academy follows the requirements of USBE SER IX.B in ensuring the appropriate use of funds under Part B of the IDEA. American Preparatory Academy participates in the single audit process required by State law that includes an audit of Part B funds.

G. Personnel standards.

All special education and related services personnel of the American Preparatory Academy meet the educator licensing requirements of the USOE for the positions in which they work, as described in the USBE SER IX.H and the Highly Qualified requirements of the USOE State Plan under No Student Left Behind and Educator Licensing - Highly Qualified Assignment (Administrative Rule R-277-510-1 through 11). All personnel necessary to carry out Part B of the IDEA are appropriately and adequately prepared, subject to the requirements related to personnel qualifications and Section 2122 of the ESEA.  American Preparatory Academy provides a program of professional development for all special education personnel, based on the identified skill and knowledge needs of teachers, assistants, related service providers, and others, and including targeted training for persons working with students with specific and individual needs for academic and social behavior instruction.

H. Performance goals and indicators in the State Performance Plan.

The American Preparatory Academy participates in additional procedures and collects and provides additional information which the USOE may require in order to meet Federal reporting requirements, including suspension and expulsion rates, LRE environments, disproportionality data, and others. (USBE SER IX.A.2)

I. Early Intervening Services.

The American Preparatory Academy uses not more than 15 percent of the amount it receives under Part B of the IDEA for any fiscal year, in combination with other amount to develop and implement coordinated early intervening services for students in grades K-9 who are not currently identified as needing special education or special education and related services, but who need additional academic and behavioral support to succeed in a general education environment. These funds are used to carry out activities including professional development that enables school personnel to deliver scientifically based academic and behavioral interventions, and educational and behavioral evaluations, services, and supports.


The American Preparatory Academy provides any and all required data on its Early Intervening Services to the USOE annually.

J. Caseload Guidelines.

American Preparatory Academy follows the USOE Caseload Guidelines in overseeing the caseload of each special educator, including related service providers, to ensure that a FAPE is available to all eligible students with disabilities.

K. Enforcement.

The confidentiality requirements of Part B of the IDEA are reviewed and approved as part of the LEA eligibility process.

L. Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

American Preparatory Academy must ensure that hearing aids worn in school by students with hearing impairments, including deafness, are functioning properly. American Preparatory Academy must ensure that external components of surgically implanted medical devices are functioning properly.


Handouts: HO G-3.1 Procedural Safeguards


Legal References: Special Education Rules (SER)


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G-3.1.1 PARENT REQUEST FOR SPED*

Chapter G - Academics

Part 3.0 Additional Academic Support

Section 3.1 Special Education

Paragraph 3.1.1 Parent Request for SPED


Policy Statement:

Parent Request for SPED

It is the policy of American Preparatory Academy that when a parent requests Special Ed testing for their student, the following procedures are followed:


  1. When a parent requests Special Ed testing, the person receiving the request must notify the following people via email:
    1. Homeroom teacher
    2. Academic Director
    3. Elementary or Jr. High Director (which ever is applicable)
    4. Special Ed department
  2. Data is gathered by the Elementary Director or the Jr. High Director on the student.
    1. Elementary Student Data
      1. Group level information (at, below, or above grade level)
      2. Group grades compiled
      3. Homeroom teacher input
      4. Homeroom grades compiled
    2. Jr. High Student Data
      1. Grades compiled
      2. Input from teachers
  3. The parent's request is responded to by the person who received the original request and a meeting is set up with:
    1. Academic Director
    2. Elementary or Jr. High Director
    3. Special Ed representative
    4. Parents
    5. Teacher (if applicable)
  4. Data is discussed and team decides if testing is the next step
  5. Parent's desires must be foremost on the team.  If the parents determine after the discussion of the data that testing should still take place, then testing will take place.
  6. If it is decided that testing will take place, "Permission to test" form is signed while at the meeting.
  7. If it is decided that testing is not the next step, "Refusal to test" form is signed while at the meeting.
  8. All paperwork and data, including original request for testing is placed together with the signed form by the parent and kept in the student file.


Supporting Documents: G-3.1.1 Parent Request for SPED Testing Checklist*

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G-3.2 ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGE SERVICES

Chapter G - Academics

Part 3.0 Additional Academic Support

Section 3.2 Alternative Language Services


Policy Statement:

Alternative Language Services

Student Services
● Students who transfer in are assessed for possible intensive instruction/acceleration to mastery.

● Intensive acceleration model for Level 3+ is designed for English Language students who plateau due to insufficient background knowledge.

○ Modified homework with vocabulary support
○ Reading University expanded program selection designed to build background knowledge

● Assign homework to watch television shows with people having conversations and interactions.

● Shurley Grammar, Voracious Vocabulary, and grade-level curriculum in lieu of Latin. 

● Double Dose of Decoding, Comprehension, DISE, Adventures in Language, Language for Learning/Thinking as needed.

● Assignments and discussions for entire class to relate personal experiences; i.e. who has moved more than 100 miles from home, who has been to a foreign country, what is your favorite food, etc.


Parent Services
● Allow students to attend meetings with parents to interpret for parents (ACCESS scores of 3+).
● Provide interpreters for parent meetings.

○ For large meetings, interpreter invites parents to sit in a group with the interpreter during the meeting.

● Important information sent to parents should be translated.

○ Newsletters

○ Registration materials

○ Handbooks

○ Office referrals

● Provide adult English language classes (DISE) throughout the week.

○ During school day and/or after school

○ A "parent liaison" would fill this role nicely - verify during hiring process


School Services
● Monitor progress of exited students for 4 years.

● Targeted language services through our curriculum (especially curriculum that provides built in repetitions).

○ DISE - Direct Instruction Spoken English

○ Decoding

○ Comprehension

○ Language for Learning

○ Language for Thinking

● Students must have a 5 or 6 on the WIDA ACCESS and be making progress in their reading groups to determine readiness to exit ELL instruction.

● The LPC is used to monitor students to make sure they are making progress from week to week.

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G-3.3 EXTENDED DAY

Chapter G - Academics

Part 3.0 Additional Academic Support

Section 3.3 Extended Day


Policy Statement:

Extended Day


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G-3.4 SUMMER SCHOOL

Chapter G - Academics

Part 3.0 Additional Academic Support

Section 3.4 Summer School

  

Policy Statement:

Summer School

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G-4.0 EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENT

G-4.1 GEOGRAPHY BEE

Chapter G - Academics

Part 4.0 Extra-curricular Academic Enhancement

Section 4.1 Geography Bee


Policy Statement:

Geography Bee

Teachers will hold an in-class geography bee according to the school calendar. All students are expected to participate in the classroom bee. Students with the top two scores will advance to the grade-wide bee.

Teachers will notify parents of classroom winners of details for the grade-wide bee including an invitation to attend. 

Classroom Bees will be provided according to the following guidelines:

  • Keep tally by giving 1 point for each correct answer.
  • You may accept alternative answers if appropriate.  You are the final judge of your classroom bee.
  • Students may request the question to be repeated or a word spelled only twice. 
  • Students have 15 seconds to give a response before being passed without a point.

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G-4.2 SPELLING BEE

Chapter G - Academics

Part 4.0 Extra-curricular Academic Enhancement

Section 4.2 Spelling Bee


Policy Statement:

Spelling Bee

Teachers will hold a classroom Spelling Bee according to the school calendar.


Rounds

All spellers spell one word each round.  All students spelling correctly will advance to the next round. Students continuing to the next round will always spell in the same order.  Speller 1 will always be speller 1, unless they are disqualified.


Pattern

  1. Pronouncer speaks the word to the speller.
  2. Speller repeats the word (They are not out if they forget to do this unless they misspell)
  3. Speller spells the word
  4. Speller repeats the word (They are not out if they forget to do this unless they misspell)

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G-4.3 SCIENCE FAIR

Chapter G - Academics

Part 4.0 Academic Enhancement

Section 4.3 Science Fair


Policy Statement:

Science Fair

5th and 6th Grades - Judge individual projects for both classes during science class time.  Pick the top 25% for each class (approximately 8 students in each class) that will display their projects in the gym for the school science fair.  These will be judged by other judges as well as the science teacher.

8th, 9th, and 10th grades - Individual projects judged by the science teachers during class.  Top 25% to go onto the school science fair.  These will also be judged by other judges.

The schoolwide fair winners are determined by final placement on the judging sheet. Finalists advance to the district wide fair.


Office Forms: OF G-4.3 Science Fair Judging Form


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G-4.4 EXTRA-CURRICULAR ENHANCEMENT

Chapter G - Academics

Part 4.0 Academic Enhancement

Section 4.4 Extra-curricular Enhancement


Policy Statement:

Extra-curricular Enhancement

Additional academic enhancement programs may be available to students including:

  • Speech Festival
  • Chess Club
  • American Prep Idol Competition
  • Math Meet
  • Drama Club
  • Mock Trial
  • Robotics Challenge


New Afterschool Club Proposal 

If starting a new club, you must fill out the Afterschool Club Proposal Form and get approval to begin club meetings. 


Handouts: HO G-4.4.1 Speech Festival Flyer

Office Forms: OF G-4.4 Afterschool Club Proposal


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G-5.0 ASSEMBLIES

G-5.1 MONTHLY BUILDER AWARDS

Chapter G - Academics

Part 5.0 Assemblies

Section 5.1 Monthly Builder Awards


Policy Statement:

Monthly Builder Awards

K-6 Show What You Know assemblies will be held each Wednesday morning at 8:00 a.m.  Grades 7-10 will have assemblies on Wednesday afternoons, and periodically during 8th period. 

Each month, the Elementary teachers will identify a "Builder of the Month" and a Reading University award winner and forward this information via email to the Academic Secretary.  Teachers must also notify parents of winners and invite them to the Wednesday assembly where the award will be given.

Special assemblies may be held upon approval from the administration.  Assemblies will reinforce curriculum.

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G-5.2 MONTHLY SHOW-WHAT-YOU-KNOW

Chapter G - Academics

Part 5.0 Assemblies

Section 5.2 Monthly Show-What-You-Know


Policy Statement:

Elementary Show-What-You-Know

Each grade level is expected to "show what they know" at least 1 to 2 Wednesdays every month.   There is limited time available during the 1st and 2nd Wednesdays due to awards. Classes will be scheduled based on a first come, first ready basis. "Show What You Know" (SWYK) presentations can include, but are not limited to, Songs, Poems, Chants, Jingles, Raps.  "Show What You Know" presentations should focus on academic themes and grade level content, showing the other students what that grade has learned.  "Show What You Know" presentations should include the entire grade - not individual classes or groups.  This is not a talent show intended to highlight one or several students, but an opportunity for that grade to show their knowledge and celebrate their success.  We do not have a schedule for each grade, but each grade should plan to "Show What They Know" once every 3 weeks (minimum).  Band and Choir should perform at least once per semester so students can have exposure to both programs.  All presentations should be no longer than 2 1/2 - 3 minutes long.

Teachers will teach their students the expectations for performance.  Classes can practice individually, and then should get together with the other grade level class to practice and perfect their performance.

Once a grade has practiced and mastered their presentation, they will notify a member of the administration that they are ready to pass it off.  Pass offs can be done in two ways:  as a whole group or as individual classes.  Assembly performances are always done as a whole group (entire grade), however.  

The administrator will come and watch and give any performance tips she/he feels are appropriate.  Performances should be quick paced and interesting for the audience.  If the students need more practice, the administrator will set up another time to pass off the performance.  When the administrator can see that the students are ready to perform at the "Show What You Know" assembly, the grade level teacher emails the school director and school secretary.  

It is recommended that the homeroom teacher notify the parents of their students that their class will be performing at the "Show What You Know" assembly (include the date and time).  

The students most often perform presentations as they stand in their lines on the floor.  If a stage and/or risers are available, it is up to the classroom teachers whose classes will be performing to find out in advance (the day before the assembly) where their class will be performing and have their students on the risers or stage when the assembly begins at 8:15 am. Follow all guidelines provided in the Policies and Procedures regarding assemblies.

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G-5.3 END-OF-YEAR CULMINATING ASSEMBLY

Chapter G - Academics

Part 5.0 Assemblies

Section 5.3 End-of-Year Culminating Assembly


Policy Statement:

End-of-Year Culminating Assembly

Each grade (K-6) will conduct a year-end culminating SWYK showcasing the highlights of knowledge for their grade level. This is the ultimate celebration of success. They will also introduce summer packets stressing the importance of keeping their brains sharp over the summer.

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G-6.0 TESTING

G-6.1 TESTING AT APA

Chapter G - Academics

Part 6.0 Testing

Section 6.1 Testing at APA


Policy Statement:

Testing at APA

American Prep is a data-driven educational institution.  In order to gather accurate data from which to make sound instructional decisions, proper testing procedures must be followed.  As a public school we are required to participate in U-PASS, and again, it is critical that we follow all testing protocols to ensure compliance and to achieve the desired outcome of reliable assessment data from which to structure our programs and ensure the academic success of each student.

Included in the staff binder distributed to each teacher/instructor is a section entitled "Testing at American Prep."  Current testing procedures, policies and protocols are listed in that section of the binder.  As staff members receive additional and ongoing testing information from the administration, they should add it to this section of their binder.

It is the responsibility of all teacher/instructors to read and understand the testing procedures and protocols.  Adherence to them will help us ensure accurate data collection from which we will build our academic program.  Violation of testing protocols will result in a disciplinary conference with the School Director and appropriate Assistant Directors and the teacher.

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G-6.1.1 TEST ADMINISTRATION HANDBOOK

Chapter G - Academics

Part 6.0 Testing

Section 6.1.1 Test Administration Handbook


Policy Statement:

American Preparatory Academy is committed to helping students achieve academic success in all categories, including standardized testing.  In addition, schools are encouraged to "develop policies and procedures consistent with the law and board rule for standardized test administration." (R277-473-9) In order to more completely assist students in achieving success, American Preparatory Academy has developed the following Test Administration Procedures. Test proctors are responsible to make sure these procedures are utilized in the classroom when testing.  If test proctors have questions about the testing procedures or need additional training, they are to contact school administration for clarification.

According to Utah State Rules, test proctors must annually:

¨ Attend a professional development training that utilizes the USOE Testing Ethics Policy Power Point presentation

¨ Receive a copy of the USOE's Testing Ethics Booklet


Testing Ethics

All state and national testing should be administered in compliance with R277-473-9.  All test proctors should understand that any unethical testing practices could result in suspension or revocation of license. 

Do's

  • DO clarify instructions for students
  • DO encourage students to use reference sheets and other resources
  • DO create a testing environment that is organized and calm.


Do Not

  • DO NOT provide students with questions from the test to review before taking the test.
  • DO NOT view the test, then change instruction or review specific concepts because those concepts appear on the test.
  • DO NOT reword or clarify questions, or use inflection or gestures to help students answer questions.
  • DO NOT allow students to use unauthorized resources to find answers, including having materials on walls which provide answers to specific test questions.
  • DO NOT return a student's answer document and instruct the student to, or suggest that the student rethink his/her answers.
  • DO NOT copy or in any way reproduce protected test materials.

Test 

Test proctors should ensure that students and the testing environment are prepared for testing.  It is American Preparatory Academy policy that test proctors administer standardized tests following all state rules and testing administration manual instructions.

  • Before Testing Begins:
    1. Test proctors should read test administration manuals (TAMS) and ensure that they have all necessary materials.  Test proctors should contact the Assessment Director if any materials are missing.
    2. Organize materials in a way that will make them easy to distribute. 
    3. Test proctors must ensure a calm and organized testing environment.


  • At the beginning of testing:
    1. Student Preparation: All students are taken to the restroom.  Water bottles are on each student's desk to be used during water breaks only.
    2. Perform Brain Gym exercises.  Teachers are encouraged to explain to the students the benefits of Brain Gym and perform the exercises professionally.
    3. Teacher follows instructions outlined in the TAMS.  Teachers use the testing instructions with fidelity and say verbatim what is outlined in the instructions. 
      As long as the instructions do not prohibit any of the following, the teacher may utilize the following test administration protocols:

  • During Instructions:
    All directions that follow the word "SAY" must be read verbatim.  Test proctors may solicit choral responses when reading directions outlined in the Test Administration Manuals.  

"Mark the answer that is most correct.  Students, which answer are you going to mark?...

It is important that students clearly understand the test directions.  At the end of the test instructions, it usually says "Do you have any questions about these directions?"  Test proctors are then to answer any procedural questions students ask (see CRT Instructions).   It is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure the directions are fully understood by the students.  Test proctors may check for understanding of procedures by asking students questions.

  • During Testing:

Proctors are to monitor the classroom by walking among the students.  Proctors should check to ensure that students are on the corresponding section of the bubble sheets, that students have not skipped lines, and that students are properly filling in the bubble sheets without stray marks or ineffective erasures. (USOE STATEP p. 4)

Proctors may check to ensure the students are on the proper section of the bubble sheet individually or as a class. "Class, please point to the section on the bubble sheet you are going to fill in" (teacher checks).

On non-timed tests, test proctors may ensure students are on the right questions/bubble sheet sections by checking with the class page by page.  No questions or answers or discussion regarding test content is ever allowed. 

In order to facilitate the test proctor's ability to ensure students are matching the corresponding bubbles with the test questions, on a non-timed test a class may be asked to wait after completing questions or a portion of the test while the proctor is able to make a visual check of the answer sheets to be sure the correct lines are being filled in.

Proctors may never change a student answer, ask the student to change an answer, or in any way communicate to the student that they should "re-look" at an answer.

The only purpose in having the class wait to finish a section or turn a page is for the proctor to be able to ensure students are using the bubble sheet or answer sheet correctly and have not skipped questions.

On un-timed tests, proctors may invite students to stand and stretch at their desk-side or get a drink of water from their water bottle at appropriate intervals.  Students should not leave their desk area during testing.

 

  • School wide testing protocols
    Incentives: Test proctors are not to use incentives that may encourage students to work through tests quickly.  Proctors are not to allow students to read a book, draw, or go to recess once they have completed a test or test section. 

Students should be taught to spend any extra time reviewing their answers, and if    allowed, writing their justification and verifications in their test booklets (see   below).  Teachers should emphasize good test taking strategies to students all during the year and verbally praise the students when they demonstrate excellent test-taking strategies (not during the test, however).


  • Reading Passages:  Students should be encouraged to read the entire reading passages, story problems, or data tables prior to reading or answering the questions.  This may conflict with test directions.  In the case of a conflict, test directions are to be read as outlined in the TAM's.  Students will have been taught to read the passage first, then the questions, and most will likely follow this training.  We have found that reading the questions first biases students so that when they read the passage they tend to "look for" information and often don't comprehend the entire passage and all of its information.   We encourage teachers to work all year to teach students how to read passages, then read questions, then look for information to check for certainty of their answer.

Students should be encouraged where allowed to mark in their test books, to underline important information and to verify answers by writing in the test book.  (This would not be possible on the 2nd grade CRT, SAT's, or Core Knowledge tests). 


  • Testing "certainty":  Students should be taught during the school year that they can be certain about their answers on a test, and they will be for the majority of questions.   Crossing out the answers they know to be wrong in a multiple choice question is the first step.  Finding the answer they feel most certain about is second.  If it is clear to them and they are certain, they should mark the bubble.


Next, students should be taught to use check marks on the numbers of the questions they have answered with certainty.  They should circle the numbers of those questions they are uncertain about.  They can then easily go back to the questions they were uncertain about and not spend any extra time re-reading those questions they were certain about.

The students should be taught to write a justification for the choices they make when they are uncertain.  This often helps them clarify their answer.

If a student completes the test and has check marks by all the answers (having spent extra time on the uncertain questions and eventually checking them off), the student should go back to a passage and write the numbers of the test question in the passage where the answer is found. 

Testing: Do Not Disturb: Test proctors should do anything possible to minimize test-taking distractions.  All classrooms should have a "Testing: Do Not Disturb" sign on the door.  


Receiving, Storing, and Returning Test Materials

  •  Receiving Test Materials:
    School administration is responsible to have testing materials prepared several days prior to the first day of testing.  Teachers will be notified where and when they can obtain their testing materials.
    1. Once test materials are received, test proctors are responsible to ensure that all students have a(n):
  • Test booklet
  • Answer document
  • #2 Pencil
  • Reference Sheet
  • Additional testing materials (calculators, rules, protractors) will be available based on school wide availability.  Test proctors will be given individual instructions on how to obtain these materials.
  • Storing Test Materials:
    Test proctors are responsible to store testing materials in a secure, locked location where students, parents, or the public cannot gain access (USOE STATEP, 4).  Teachers should locate a secure storage location with in their classroom.  If such a location cannot be found in the classroom, please contact school administration to determine an appropriate storage location.

  • Returning Test Materials:Test proctors should return all testing materials within three days of all students completing the test.
    1. Answer documents should be removed from test booklets and alphabetized by last name.  Answer documents should be placed on top of all test books. Test materials should not be returned unless this procedure has been followed.  Do not return materials that are not alphabetized or that are missing student answer documents. If you have received an answer document for a student that is no longer in your class, place this test on top of the other answer documents with a post-it note stating the student has withdrawn.

    2. Completed tests may be returned one at a time (i.e., a teacher may return all science testing materials before returning all math testing materials).  Tests may be returned as soon as all students in the class have completed the test and the answer documents have been alphabetized.

    3. If students have taken tests with a different test proctor to accommodate IEP's, please wait to return testing material until all test have been returned and placed with the class answer documents.

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G-7.0 PROMOTION*

G-7.1 SCHOOL PROMOTION POLICY

Chapter G - Academics

Part 7.0 Promotion

Section 7.1 Promotion Policy


Policy Statement:

School Promotion Policy

Students must meet minimum criteria for promotion each year.  Teachers may automatically recommend a student for promotion only if the student meets the following criteria: 

  1. Student passed all subjects three quarters of the year with at least a C grade.
  2. Student attended school a minimum of 160 days (less than 21 absences).
  3. Student passed at least the lowest level of the skills classes - reading and mathematics - for their grade level, and scored proficient for their grade level on the state end-of-level assessment.
  4. Student has not been suspended during the school year.


Teachers may not recommend for promotion any student who does not meet the above criteria.  The Student Promotion Advisory board will review all relevant documentation (for each student not recommended for promotion) regarding the student's performance, including but not limited to:  grades, attendance, academic achievement records including assessments, work product, and learning plans.  The Student Promotion Advisory Board will make a determination if the student qualifies for promotion to the next grade.

In order to recommend promotion, the Student Promotion Advisory Board will ensure that in their estimation and utilizing concrete data the student demonstrates sufficient skills and content knowledge to be successful at the next grade level.  If, in their best estimation, the student does not demonstrate sufficient skills and content knowledge (as evidenced by grades, test scores and other evaluative measures including but not limited to those listed above) to be successful at the next grade level, the student will not be recommended for promotion and will be offered a seat in the current grade for the subsequent year on a space available basis.


Promotion of Secondary Students

Students must meet minimum criteria for promotion each year.  Teachers may automatically recommend a student for promotion only if the student meets the following criteria: 

  1. Student passed all subjects three quarters of the year with at least a D grade.
  2. Student attended school a minimum of 160 days (less than 21 absences).
  3. Student has not been suspended during the year.


Supplemental school resources are available to assist secondary students who are not succeeding in their courses.  These may include Academic Extended Day, Study Center, Learning Lab, Summer School, etc.    

Secondary students who have failed one or more terms due to incomplete coursework may be required to attend Learning Lab. 

Secondary students who have failed one or more terms, but who complete and submit their assignments may be eligible for Course Compensation.  Course Compensation removes the AP/Honors designation from the course title in the student's transcript and an appropriate adjustment is made to the student's grade in that course.  All Course Compensations must be approved by the Secondary Director. 


Guidelines for Course Compensation will be established annually by the Secondary Directors and Department Heads and may vary by subject and by teacher. 

 

An example of a Course Compensation might be:

Student Alpha completed 82% of the coursework in Mr. Smith's Honors Language Arts 10 but his grade percentage is 56%, an F.  The Secondary Director and Language Arts Department Head have determined the following compensation schedule for this class:

    • 0-75% Completion = 0% Grade Compensation
    • 75-80% Completion = 7% Grade Compensation
    • 80-85% Completion = 10% Grade Compensation
    • 85-90% Completion = 13% Grade Compensation
    • 90-95% Completion = 16% Grade Compensation
    • 95-100% Completion = 19% Grade Compensation
    Student Alpha's transcript is adjusted so that the course is designated as Language Arts 10 and he receives a 66% in the class, which is a D.


Secondary students who fail to be promoted at the end of the school year, but who remediate failed courses through a pre-approved process (such as online high school credits during the summer) may be re-eligible for promotion in the Fall.


Accelerated Promotions

If the parents request that a student move ahead, and the academic data indicates a student can be successful in an upper grade, and then we should honor the parental request.

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G-8.0 HOMEBOUND/HOSPITAL INSTRUCTION

G-8.1 HOMEBOUND/HOSPITAL INSTRUCTION

Chapter G - Student Behavior

Part 8.0 Homebound.Hospital Instruction

Section 8.1 Homebound.Hospital Instruction


Policy Statement:

Hospital/Homebound instruction is a service of American Preparatory Academy in accordance with requirements of the Utah State Board of Education that provides for the continuance of academic progress to those students who are defined as homebound and/or hospitalized.

American Prep provides instruction for convalescing students in grades 1-12 to alleviate concern over academic work/credit, to maintain the skills necessary for returning to the classroom, and to assure ongoing school/home contact during the term of illness or injury.

The Administration of the Hospital/Homebound program includes the following guidelines:

  1. Qualification for Services
    1. The student is currently enrolled in an American Preparatory Academy school.
    2. The student is confined in a home or hospital setting due to physical illness, psychological or emotional illness, injury, disability or other short-term medical necessity.
    3. The student has missed or expects to miss ten (10) or more consecutive days of school.
    4. The student is consistently unable to attend school on a regular daily basis or is unable to attend at least four (4) school periods per day because of a verified chronic illness or serious medical condition.
    5. Hospital/Homebound Services are generally considered to be short-term and must be requested by a parent or guardian.
    6. A written request for services is required from the attending physician. The request must include the exam date, diagnosis, medication(s) that may limit or affect learning, expected duration of confinement, and any other pertinent information. The Hospital/Homebound Coordinator will contact the physician for further verification and information as needed. Parents must make a request to the attending physician that appropriate information pertaining to the student's medical condition be shared with the Coordinator so that determination of eligibility for services can be made.
    7. If the length of confinement is more than six (6) weeks, a physician's update will be required in order to continue homebound services. While the input from social workers and other medical professionals may be helpful in determining eligibility for services, their request for service must be accompanied by the medical doctor's formal request for services and diagnosis.
    8. Students who are pregnant do not qualify for Homebound services. The only exception would be for students who experience documented serious medical complications. If a student has received Hospital/Homebound services for serious medical complications, after delivery, the student is expected to return to school within three (3) weeks and will be released from Hospital/Homebound instruction.
    9. The student is not eligible for Hospital/Homebound instruction if the identified illness pertains to another family member.
    10. The student is ineligible for Hospital/Homebound services if he/she is employed and is attending work.
    11. NO HOMEBOUND SERVICES WILL BE STARTED DURING THE FINAL MONTH OF THE SCHOOL YEAR.
  2. Providing for Services
    1. The request for Hospital/Homebound services is made to the Administrative Director by parent or the local school.
    2. Parents must make their request to the physician who will provide written verification of the illness, the need for services and a diagnosis. The physician should submit this information to the District Coordinator as quickly as possible.
    3. Assessment of the need and eligibility for services will be determined by the Coordinator who will then notify the parents, local school and the Department of Student Services of the decision.
    4. Students who are placed on Hospital/Homebound will remain enrolled within the local school and are not counted as "absent." The Department of Student Services will enter and keep a record of enrollment/exit dates for accountability purposes.
    5. The Coordinator will assign a homebound teacher to the student. The teacher will coordinate the instructional schedule with the parent/guardian. Instruction will be provided after regular school hours for a period of two (2) hours per week.
    6. Curriculum will be based on the current core standards for students in grades 1-6. Students in grades 7-12 will be instructed in a total of four (4) core academic subjects.
    7. Homebound/Hospital services may be discontinued for the following reasons:
      1. lack of family cooperation with an instruction schedule.
      2. lack of medical verification as to current confinement need.
      3. determination that continued Homebound/Hospital services is not in the best interest of the student.
      4. increased or prolonged school phobia.
  3. Grades and Credit for School Attendance
    1. If the elementary teacher chooses not to be the assigned Hospital/Homebound instructor, the classroom teacher will prepare assignments and materials for the student(s) in his/her class. Substitute assignments may be provided if the regular class activities cannot be completed outside the classroom. Grades earned during confinement will be averaged into the student's grades earned after returning to school to compute the student's final grade.
    2. Secondary teachers will prepare assignments and materials for students in their classes who are receiving Hospital/Homebound instruction. Substitute assignments may be provided if the regular class activities cannot be completed outside the classroom. If the subject cannot be appropriately taught through Hospital/Homebound instruction, the teacher should give the student an "incomplete" for the course and provide an opportunity for the student to make-up the missed credit through an alternative class or program.
    3. Grades earned during confinement will be averaged into the secondary student's grades earned prior to leaving or after returning to school to compute the student's final grade. Because of limited instructional time, the Hospital/Homebound Program will help a student maintain credit in some classes. However, because of time constraints, limits on curriculum content that can be covered (especially in AP and other advanced courses), and the duration and severity of the illness, students may not be able to earn sufficient credits to stay on track for graduation and the overall grade point average may change.
    4. Secondary Hospital/Homebound students will not receive more credit than could be earned at school during the concurrent grading period.
    5. Hospital/Homebound instructors are not expected to tutor students for "make-up" work for previous absences before the student was enrolled in the Hospital/Homebound Program.
  4. Selection and Responsibility of Instructors
    1. A Hospital/Homebound instructor must be a teacher currently employed by American Prep. There are no exceptions to this rule.
    2. Once the Hospital/Homebound instructor has been assigned, he/she will contact the parent/guardian as soon as possible to arrange for the homebound visits.
    3. The Hospital/Homebound instructor will coordinate teaching materials and assignments with the regular classroom teacher(s).
    4. If problems arise in the teaching process, the Hospital/Homebound coordinator should be contacted for immediate consultation.


Supplemental Material: Office Forms: OF H-3.3 Student Infraction Record Form

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G-9.0 COUNSELING

G-9.1 AT RISK STUDENTS

Chapter G - Student Behavior

Part 9.0 Counseling 

Section 8.1 At Risk Students


Policy Statement:

 

As adopted by American Prep’s governing board on January 22, 2019:

 

At-risk of academic failure designates students grades 7-12 who have:

  1. failed to pass any subject during any quarter of the current school year with at least a D grade;
  2. not achieved mastery on their most recent RISE, ACT Aspire Plus, or ACT college-readiness exams;
  3. not attended 5% or more of the current school year (equivalent to approximately 10 full-day absences); or
  4. been suspended one or more days during the current school year.

 

Critically at-risk designates those students grades 7-12 who have:

  1. failed to pass any subject two quarters or more during the current school year with at least a D grade;
  2. not attended 10% or more of the current school year (equivalent to approximately 20 full-day absences);
  3. been suspended more than one day during the current school year; or
  4. not acquired a minimum of 7 high school credits per year of high school (ex. First semester sophomore with fewer than 7 high school credits).

 

Interventions utilized in regard to at-risk students may include one or more of the following:

  1. Afterschool Homework Assistance
  2. Credit Recovery Packets
  3. Parent Intervention
  4. Character Development
  5. Scholar Academy
  6. Check-in with Admin, Counselors, or SpEd

 

Legal References: 

R277-708 Enhancement for At-Risk Students

R277-609-4 LEA Responsibility to Develop Plans

 

APA Policy Reference:


Comprehensive Conduct and Discipline Plan

 

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G-9.2 COMPREHENSIVE COUNSELING & GUIDANCE PROGRAM

Chapter G – Academics

Part 9.0 Counseling

Section 9.2 Comprehensive Counseling & Guidance Program (CCGP)

 

 

Policy Statement:

Comprehensive Counseling & Guidance Program (CCGP)

American Prep does not utilize state funding related to the Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Program.  Should American Prep determine that it is practicable to pursue such funds, it will abide by the CCGP performance review and other requirements of the Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Program as contained in R277-462.

 

Legal References:  R277-462

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G-9.3 COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

Chapter G – Academics

Part 9.0 Counseling

Section 9.3 College and Career Readiness

 

Policy Statement:

College and Career Readiness

American Prep’s governing board, in consultation with school personnel, parents, and school community councils, establish this policy to provide for effective implementation of an individual learning plan or a plan for college and career readiness for each student at the school site.

 

According to 53E-2-304, American Prep students develop College and Career Readiness Plans, in consultation with local counselors, teachers, and administrators, that:

(A) are initiated at the beginning of grade 7;

(B) identify a student’s skills and objectives;

(C) map out strategies to guide student course selection; and

(D) link students to post-secondary options, including higher education and careers.

 

Parents/guardians and secondary students are given the opportunity to review the student’s College and Career Readiness Plan at least biennially with school personnel.  The review will: 

(A) recognize the student's accomplishments, strengths, and progress toward meeting student achievement standards as defined in the core standards for Utah public schools;

(B) include a review of student’s transcript and assessment data;

(C) include a review of a student’s anticipated course schedules, considering promotion/graduation requirements first, as well as courses helpful to the student’s college and career preparation goals; and

(C) include an opportunity to review the student’s individual learning plan, if applicable, as well as possible academic interventions for at-risk students.

A student and/or parent/guardian may request a conference with school personnel in addition to the scheduled College and Career Readiness planning meetings.  

 

 

Legal References:  53E-2-304

 

APA Policy Reference:

G-9.1 At-Risk Students

 

 



G-SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

G-HANDOUTS

HO G-2.4 ACTIVITY REQUEST FORM

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HO G-2.4.3 OVERNIGHT ACTIVITY INFORMATION HANDOUT

Overnight Activity Information Handout

To be completed by the Field Trip Coordinator and shared with parents prior to Overnight Field Trips.   Overnight trips require a meeting with parents and students to review behavior expectations and disciplinary practices. 


Forms required from students and parents for participation include:

            OF G-2.4.3 High School Conduct Expectations

            OF G-2.4.3 Overnight Notarized Parent Permission Form 

 

Student Name:______________________________________Grade:________Birth Date:_______________


Trip Information:      Destination/Activity: __________________________________________________

                                          Trip Dates: __________________________________________________________     

                                          Departing: __________________________________________________________   

                                          Returning: __________________________________________________________


WHAT:(Describe activity, destination. Include agenda or schedule if applicable.)

 

WHEN:(Date(s), time of leaving, time of return.)

 

CHAPERONES: (Names of adults, if known, or description, such as "4 parent volunteers and Mrs. , (teacher)".)

 

TRANSPORTATION: (Describe arrangements, e.g., chartered bus, public transportation, school van, private vehicles, etc.)

 

COSTS: (For transportation, admission, food, etc.)

 

MEALS: (Brown bag? Other? Cafeteria?)

 

ATTIRE: (Uniform? Dress Code? Jackets? Special Equipment?)

 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE:

 

OTHER INFORMATION:

 

DESTINATION:

 

ADDRESS/PHONE #: (Address and phone number of trip location for overnight trips        

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HO G-3.1 SPED PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS*

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HO G-4.4.1 SPEECH FESTIVAL FLYER


Announcing....

 

 APA's 1st Annual Speech Festival

For Elementary Grades (K-6)

 

(Jr. High Speech Festival information will come later on in the school year)


Elementary In-Class Festival:  April 25-May 1


Elementary School-wide Festival:  May 3, 2012


All students will participate in the in-class festival

Each student will have 2 minutes to present a pre-approved poem or dialogue to his or her class.  All Core Knowledge poems, class poems, excerpts from the Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, or Core Knowledge speeches are pre-approved. If a student does not choose a poem or dialogue by that time, something they have already memorized in class will be assigned. 


The top two students in each class will be chosen to compete in the school-wide festival. 


What can you do to increase your chances of winning? 

Make sure you know every word of your poem, practice reading it with expression and feeling, make it great!



Why a speech festival? 

  1. To give the students the experience of getting in front of others and speaking in a place where they are safe.
  2. To encourage students to improve in their public speaking abilities.
  3. To give students with a public speaking talent an opportunity to shine.




This is going to be great!! 

Happy speaking, Happy practicing!

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G-OFFICE FORMS

OF G-2.4.2 VIDEO USAGE REQUEST FORM

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OF G-2.4.3 FIELD TRIP INFORMATION FORM


Field Trip Information Form

 

 

Student Name:______________________________________Grade:________Birth Date:_______________


Trip Information:      Destination/Activity: __________________________________________________

                                          Trip Dates: __________________________________________________________     

                                          Departing: __________________________________________________________   

                                          Returning: __________________________________________________________


WHAT:(Describe activity, destination. Include agenda or schedule if applicable.)

 

WHEN:(Date(s), time of leaving, time of return.)

 

CHAPERONS: (Names of adults, if known, or description, such as "4 parent volunteers and Mrs. , (teacher)".)

 

TRANSPORTATION: (Describe arrangements, e.g., chartered bus, public transportation, school van, private vehicles, etc.)

 

COSTS: (For transportation, admission, food, etc.)

 

MEALS: (Brown bag? Other? Cafeteria?)

 

ATTIRE: (Uniform? Dress Code? Jackets? Special Equipment?)

 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE:

 

OTHER INFORMATION:

 

DESTINATION:

 

ADDRESS/PHONE #: (Address and phone number of trip location for overnight trips        

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OF G-2.4.3 HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS CONDUCT EXPECTATIONS

 

High School Events Conduct Expectations


As mandated by Utah Education Code, American Prep has the duty to provide a safe and orderly environment for students and staff.  Our discipline policy and procedures are a reflection of this obligation to our stakeholders. 


To retain eligibility for participation in both on-campus and off-campus activities at American Preparatory Academy, students must conduct themselves as good citizens both in and out of school at all times. This policy is in effect and applied to student code of conduct 365 days a year for students in grades 9-12. Students who represent the school in an activity are expected to cooperate with all rules and directions given by staff, show respect, and serve as good role models to other students and the community.


A student may lose eligibility for participation in activities for the following:

  • Possession, use or purchase of tobacco products, alcoholic beverages, or illegal drugs or substances.  "Use" includes having the odor of alcohol or tobacco on one's breath.  Also, the unauthorized possession, use or purchase of otherwise lawful drugs;
  • Possession of any of an item banned from campus, including weapons, toy weapons, explosive, noxious, or flammable substances, bullets, knives, and sexually explicit material (H-3.3.2);
  • Use of cell phones during activities, including taking pictures of other students with personal cell phones or other personal devices, or using electronics in ways that violate the safety and privacy of others; Please contact your grade level student council records attaché or event photographer if you would like a picture taken.  
  • Un-builder-like behavior including bullying or cyber-bullying.
  • Engaging in any act that would be grounds for arrest or citation in the criminal or juvenile court system, excluding minor traffic offenses, regardless of whether the student was cited, arrested, convicted, or adjudicated for the act(s);
  • Inappropriate or offensive conduct, including any public display of affection such as hand-holding, hugging, or kissing, or any conduct that staff deems harmful or unsafe;





I have read and reviewed the High School Events Conduct Expectations with my parent/guardian and agree to conduct myself according to the standards of behavior explained in the above Expectations.


______________________________            _____________________________________          ____________

Student Name (printed)                         Student Signature                                              Date


American Prep is committed to a safe environment. Our staff will be on alert and prepared to question, remove, and immediately call parents if there is any inappropriate, unlawful, unsafe or suspicious activity at any school activity.  As the parent/guardian of my student, I understand the behavior standards and agree to come and retrieve my child if they violate these standards.


______________________________            _____________________________________          ____________

Parent Name (printed)                           Parent Signature                                                            Date


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OF G-2.4.3 OVERNIGHT NOTARIZED PARENT PERMISSION


Overnight Notarized Parent Permission Form

 

 

Student Name:______________________________________Grade:________Birth Date:_______________


General Directions: Complete both sides of the form, have it properly notarized, and return it to:


      Staff Member: ______________________   Campus: ________     No Later Than: _________________

 

Trip Information:      Destination/Activity: __________________________________________________

                                          Trip Dates: __________________________________________________________     

                                          Departing: __________________________________________________________   

                                          Returning: __________________________________________________________


Contact Information:

ContactPhone Number (with Area Code)
Father/Guardian's Name:Home #:
   Employer's Name:Pager/Cell #:
   Employer's AddressEmployment #:
Mother/Guardian's Name:Home #:
   Employer's Name:Pager/Cell #:
   Employer's Address:Employment #:
Additional Contact Name:Home #:
   Address:Pager/Cell #:
   Relationship:Employment #:

 

Student General Health Information: During the trip, your student may be under the care and supervision of several chaperones.  Confidentiality rules prevent the district nursing staff from sharing the medical information of a student with a chaperone without the written consent of the child's parent/guardian.  For the safety and welfare of your child, please indicate any medical information, behavioral issues, and/or special needs your student may have that you would like the chaperones on the trip to be aware of. (Attach another page if necessary.):

 

1.List your student's daily medications (doses and times of administration):
a) 
b) 
2.List any Emergency and PRN medications (over-the-counter or prescribed) for your student and the circumstances under which they are to be given:
a) 
b) 
3.List student's health conditions requiring procedures or medication (be specific, i.e. asthma, diabetes, seizures, food allergies, etc.)
a) 
b) 
4.List any health history that may be helpful if your child becomes ill.
 
 
 

 

*Complete page 2


Overnight Notarized Parent Permission Form (page 2)

Student Name:______________________________________Grade:________Birth Date:______________


Trip Information:           Destination/Activity: _________________________________________________

                                          Trip Dates: _________________________________________________________

 

Parental Consent:

1.  I/We, the undersigned, as parent, parents, or guardian, give my/our consent for the student identified herein to participate in this activity as an ambassador of his/her school.

2.  I/We understand that students participating in this activity are expected to abide by the Code of Conduct as defined in the Parent-Student Handbook.  I/We agree to be responsible for transportation home from the activity should the student violate the Code of Conduct.

3. I/We recognize that student backpacks, luggage, bag, and room accommodations are subject to search and I/we hereby consent to such by the designated district personnel.

4. I/We hereby accept financial responsibility for equipment or materials lost or damaged by the student.

5.  I/We recognize that there are risks associated with the student's participation in the activity, including moderate to strenuous physical activity, emotional distress, injury or death.  I/We state that the student is free from any known health or emotional impairments that could make participation unsafe for him/her.

6.  I/We recognize that the school may allow the student to travel to other schools or locations in busses, school, or private vehicles driven by staff, public transportation employees, or volunteers.

7.  I/We will not hold American Preparatory Academy or anyone acting on its behalf responsible or liable for any injury or death occurring in the course of such activities or such travel. I/We release American Preparatory Academy, its employees, and agents from all costs incurred from this activity, including any claims, costs or damages arising from the negligence of American Preparatory Academy, its employees, or agents.

8. I/We authorize the school or its agents/chaperones, to transport and to obtain, through a health care provider of their own choice, any emergency medical care that may be deemed necessary or advisable for the student in the course of such activities or such travel. I/We also agree to be personally responsible for such transportation and/or medical expenses. I/We further agree that these costs shall not be borne by American Preparatory Academy, its agents or employees. 


Insurance Co. ______________________Policy #:__________________Group #:___________


Parent/Guardian:________________________   Signature: _________________________ Date:__________

 

Student (if over 18):______________________  Signature: _________________________ Date:__________


Note: Notary Public Stamp and Signature is required (often available at your banking institution). 

State of Utah

County of Salt Lake


On _______________________, 2013, _________________________________ personally appeared before me


                        _____ Who is personally known to me

                        _____ Whose identity I proved on the basis of _________________

                        _____ Whose identity I proved on the oath/affirmation of _________________

to be the signer of the above document and he/she ackowleged that he/she signed it

        

Notary Signature:_________________________________________Notary No.:_________________________


Notary Stamp:                     

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OF G-4.4 AFTERSCHOOL CLUB PROPOSAL


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G-SUPPORTIVE RESEARCH

LPA ACADEMIC POLICIES*

II. Academic Policies & Learning Guidelines

A.   Philosophy

Classical Education Philosophy

Education gives children the opportunity to learn from great minds of the past (e.g. Aristotle, Thomas Jefferson, Galileo, and others).   The gift of education allows students to create a better future for themselves and the world they live in.

Quality education should embrace and magnify a child's innate curiosity to learn.  LPA will strive to provide a strong foundation of knowledge and learning skills to support the educational path a student may choose to pursue.  Classical education constructs this foundation by giving priority to mastery of mathematics and language arts.  Emphasizing fine arts will strengthen the learning process and develop a creative and reasoning mind.

Parental involvement is crucial to a child's academic success. LPA will do all in its power to encourage meaningful parental participation. Collaboration among the student, parent, and educator is also  essential. . School hours, methods of communication, and homework schedules are designed to recognize the importance of family time and support.

Character education is imperative to the creation of a responsible and contributing member of society. LPA's educational environment will support the development of positive character traits such as respect, integrity, and hard work.  The fusion of intellect and character will enable the student to become a productive, conscientious citizen.


Classical Education Model

Student academic achievement is the primary goal of Legacy Preparatory Academy. We believe that when students are fluent in the basic foundational knowledge of the major disciplines they can move on to effectively express their knowledge and master higher-level skills. Therefore, foundation of our instruction will focus on mastery of fundamentals. 

We define mastery as the ability to demonstrate knowledge and skills repeatedly and accurately.  This requires repeated instruction in the subject matter, increasing degree of challenge and considerable practice.   As our students master the fundamentals, our instruction will focus on sequential building of conceptual knowledge and promoting independent expression of knowledge.  Finally, our instruction will focus on individual internalization of conceptual knowledge, expressed in extensive written work and verbal presentation, preparing our students for advanced study at the college level.

These levels of instruction and knowledge attainment follow the classical education model of the Trivium - grammar, logic and rhetoric.  Legacy Preparatory Academy respects this well-founded, proven educational model and uses it in selecting and implementing the school's curriculum.

Our academic policies support our academic mission and philosophy.

An important and vital component of academic achievement is that of organization of student work.  LPA students will be given tools and training that will assist them in becoming independent students and in organizing their school work, thus maximizing the potential for them to succeed. 

 

Academic Performance Support

LPA is a "school of choice" with a rigorous academic program. 

We recognize that there may be students or parents who find our program is not a good "fit" for them.  LPA's academic program comprises three vitally important components: 

  1. The work and effort of the teachers and staff
  2. The work and effort of the students
  3. The support and effort of parents

Teachers are trained and well prepared to teach our students.  They are an experienced, well-trained group of professionals who are enthusiastic about their job in assisting your student as they learn, grow and achieve academically.  Students who attend LPA bring their own enthusiasm and love of learning to school with them each day.  However, if a teacher is not putting forth sufficient effort to enable the students to achieve mastery in the content area, the administration is committed to rectifying this through staff development, coaching and training. If the teacher, after the remedies have been implemented, continues to be unsuccessful working at the level required they will be dismissed. 

Students who attend LPA bring their own enthusiasm and love of learning to school with them each day. They bear much responsibility with regard to exerting effort and completing assigned work so that they can benefit fully from the excellent academic programs of LPA.  We believe that it is the responsibility of the school to provide effective organizational systems, positive motivation, excellent teachers and relevant, interesting curriculum for each student so that they can achieve academic success at LPA.  We are confident that working together, all students can achieve this success.

Parental/Guardian Support and Involvement is key to student achievement at LPA.  LPA will do all in its power to encourage meaningful parental participation.  Collaboration among the student, parent, and educator is an essential component for success.

            LPA Parents commit to two components of support:

  1.  LPA parents commit to academic support as outlined at the end of this handbook in LPA's Title I School-Parent Policy, LPA's Parent-School Learning Compact, and in the Annual Acceptance of Policy.
  2. LPA parents commit to volunteer support as outlined below under Volunteer Guidelines.

      LPA recognizes that we cannot control student effort or parental participation.  We feel it is our duty to provide all the tools necessary and do all we can to motivate students to succeed.  Ultimately, we recognize that despite our best efforts, academic progress will not be obtained if the student and/or parent is unwilling to do their part.

      If a student consistently fails to take advantage of LPA's academic programs or if the parent fails to honor the Acceptance of Policy or, LPA's Parent-School Learning Compact, then the school administration may recommend to the Governing Board that the student's priority enrollment be reconsidered.   The Governing Board will hold a meeting with the family to discuss areas of concern.  Any of the following and other violations, may result in a governing board hearing:

  1. Students who fail the academic course of study as a result of lack of effort.
  2. Students who display willful noncompliance as evidenced by failure to turn in consecutive assignments or participate in class work.
  3. Parents who are unwilling to review and sign the learning plan each day for students and who fail to ensure their student completes assignments.
  • Homework Support

It is the hope of LPA that our students will come to love learning and desire to spend time studying and reading.  LPA hopes that parents will encourage and support  students in completing homework. To assist our families in developing life-long learners, LPA has adopted the following guidelines:

Homework is an integral part of the educational program at LPA. It is an extension of the classroom lessons and should directly relate to class work. It reinforces skills and concepts and helps develop good study skills and habits. It also informs parents of what is being taught in the classroom. Some guidelines for the assignment of homework follow:

  •     Homework should be assigned with coordination between teachers and with consideration for the importance of student participation in family activities and responsibilities.
  •     An LPA student should spend time each day studying, whether or not homework is assigned. If no homework is assigned, students are encouraged to review math and/or read.
  • Homework Guidelines:

  Students will be given homework most weekday evenings. 

  Homework assignments will be appropriate, relevant, interesting and, at times, challenging. 

  Homework assignments should not be new material for students, but should be a review, extra practice or an         extension of material already taught in school. 

Students should be able to complete their homework within the time frames below, with the exception of special projects, failing to complete class work, falling behind due to tardy arrivals, absences or failing to use time effectively during the school day:

  • Sixth grade - 60 minutes
  • Seventh grade - 70 minutes
  • Eighth grade - 80 minutes
  • Ninth grade - 90 minutes
  • Tenth grade - 90 minutes
  • Eleventh grade - 90 minutes

These times do not include free reading time.  Students should read an additional period of time each evening.

  • Learning Environment Guidelines

Parents should provide an environment in the home that enables their student to engage in scholarly pursuits on a daily basis.  A successful learning environment contains the following elements:

  • a quiet place to study and complete assignments
  • access to necessary tools (pencils, paper, adequate lighting, resources such as reference books)
  • freedom from distractions (TV, video and computer games, distracting music or conversations)

LPA recommends that families adopt a "no TV, no video games" policy Monday through Thursday.  We believe it is   in the best interest of our students to spend their free time reading, studying, engaging in physical activities and playing games that are mentally stimulating.  Ample research has demonstrated that it is not beneficial for students to watch TV and play video games on a daily basis.  Lack of physical exercise is resulting in epidemic proportions of obesity in our country.  We encourage our families to provide opportunities for their students to exercise and study during the weekday evenings.

LPA recommends that families, where possible, establish study time in the early evenings, allowing their students time after school to engage in physical activities and play.  We encourage families to engage in study time together, possibly at a central location such as the kitchen table.  Mom and/or Dad can sit and study or complete work of their own while students complete their work.  Family study time works well because parents are close by to act as a resource should the student need them.  Parents also help keep the student focused on studying and can easily sign the learning plan as assignments are completed.

LPA recommends that parents review the academic scope and sequence received from their student's teacher each semester, then utilize the public library to have educational resources on hand at home that will serve to extend and expand the student's learning on the subjects they are studying.

B. Instructional Programs

Student Education Plan and Student Education and Occupation

LPA's Governing Board has adopted this policy to support the philosophy that collaboration among the student, parent, and educator is an essential component for success. Personal education planning at the elementary occurs during the Student Education Plan (SEP) meetings or Parent Teacher Conferences.  At the secondary level (6-12), planning takes place in the form of a Student Education and Occupation Plan (SEOP). The individual needs of each student are met by careful consideration of useful and timely data on student progress and thoughtful goal setting. The SEP and SEOP is a process which continues from grade to grade and school to school.  Continual assessment of student progress and goals is essential to the SEP/SEOP process.

 (insert procedures from PTC forms)

Graduation Requirements/ School Credits

LPA's Governing Board has adopted this policy to specify standards and credit requirements for graduation from Legacy Preparatory Academy and to provide for differentiated diplomas or certificates of completion with state law and rules.

The Governing Board of Legacy Preparatory Academy is authorized under Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision of the public education system in the Board and, UCA §§ 53A-1-402 (1)(b) and (c) which directs the State Board of Education to make rules regarding competency levels, graduation requirements, curriculum, and instruction requirements, and UCA §53A-1-401(3) which allows the State Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities.

Diplomas and Certificates of Completion

Legacy Preparatory Academy shall award diplomas and certificates of completion.

  • A diploma shall be awarded to students who successfully complete all state and District course requirements for graduation.
  • A certificate of completion shall be awarded to students who have completed their senior year, are exiting the school system, and have not met all state or District requirements for a diploma

Academic Requirements

Grades 6 through 8 shall earn a minimum of 17.5 units of credit to be properly prepared for instruction in grades 9-12.  Or grades 7 through 8 shall earn a minimum of 12 units of credit to be properly prepared for instruction in grades 9-12.

(insert credits)

            High School Requirements

Students in grade 9 through 12 must earn a minimum of 27  units of credit through course completion or through competency assessment consistent with Utah Administrative Rule R277-705 and District policy to graduate.

                   English                 4.0

                   Social Studies      3.5

                   Math                     3.0 (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2)

                   Science                 3.0  (2 credits from this list: Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics)

                   Fine Arts               1.5       

                   Foreign Language 2.0

                   (two years of Latin are required at LPA, if they are taken in Middle School another language may be chosen.)

                   CTE                       1.0

                   P.E.                        1.5 (included 0.5 of Fit for Life)

                   Health                    0.5

                   Computer Tech.     0.5

                   Financial Literacy  0.5       

                   Electives                6.0                                           

                                                27.0  Total Credits

(insert classes between departments)

           


Citizenship Requirements

Graduation requirements at Legacy Preparatory Academy include satisfactory citizenship and adherence to the rules and policies of the school.  Failure to earn the required citizenship credits shall result in withholding of the graduation diploma/certificate of completion.

For graduation a student is required to earn citizenship credit in grades 9 through 12.  Students can earn .25 units of citizenship credit in each class for each term, grades 9 through 12. In addition, credit is awarded by the administration.

All graduating seniors are required to have 44 units of citizenship credit.  For specific details see the Citizenship section below.

Units of Credit

A unit of credit or fraction thereof shall be given upon satisfactory completion of a course or learning experience in compliance with state course standards.  In some cases, course credit may also be completed on a performance basis in which case assessment of mastery will be the responsibility of the LPA Credit Evaluation Committee.  Credit can be awarded only once for a specific required course with the same content during the secondary school experience.

LPA may grant credit for the successful completion of a course from among the following:

  • a course offered by the LPA
  • a course approved by the LPA taken outside of the regular school day or school year;
  • a concurrent enrollment course approved by LPA and offered by an accredited post-secondary institution (3 college quarter hours= .5 high school credit and 3 college semester hours= 1 high school credit.)
  • a course offered by correspondence or extension that is approved and accredited by the State of Utah
  •  a course from an accredited secondary school, accredited special purpose school, accredited supplemental education school, and the Utah Electronic High School.
  • a course from other credit sources with written approval by the Credit Evaluation Committee prior to program enrollment.
  • an experimental program approved by the Credit Evaluation Committee prior to program enrollment.

LPA may also grant credit for demonstrated proficiency by way of an LPA approved test developed by the state or district; performance appraisal; or portfolio; such assessments to be conducted and approved by the Credit Evaluation Committee.

Home Instruction

Students released for Home Instruction do not earn credits.  If students reenter LPA, requests for credit for home instruction studies will be evaluated under the provisions provided in the LPA's  Credit Evaluation Standards and Guidelines Policy below.

Early Graduation Option

The option is available to any secondary student interested in graduating early who has satisfied all existing graduation requirements of Legacy Preparatory Academy. Options for earning credits are outlined in the Graduation Requirements and Units of Credits sections above.

 In consultation with a student's parent/guardian and school counselor, each student shall indicate to his or her school counselor and school director, or his/her designee, the intent to graduate early at the beginning of the ninth grade year or as soon as possible thereafter as the intent is known.

 To be eligible for early graduation, a student shall have a current student education and occupation plan (SEOP) on file at the student's high school.  The SEOP shall outline the course work needed to satisfy the early graduation goal.  The secondary director or designee may prorate citizenship credit requirements for students who have met all other graduation requirements.

Students who complete the graduation requirements by the end of the regular academic year, may participate in that year's graduation ceremony. Students who complete the graduation requirements any time after the end of the regular academic year, may participate in the next graduation ceremony.  Students who graduate early will receive a high school diploma and assume the status of alumni.

Partial Tuition Scholarships are available to any student who graduates at the conclusion of the eleventh grade year or during the twelfth grade. The partial tuition scholarship is called the Early Graduation Centennial Scholarship Certificate, and is to be used at a Utah public college, university, community college, applied technology college or other institution in Utah accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, that offers post-secondary courses. To be eligible for the scholarship the student must enroll in an eligible postsecondary institution within one calendar year of graduation.

Concurrent Enrollment

LPA offers Concurrent Enrollment to full time 11th & 12th grade students who demonstrate readiness for college level work.  Courses from local colleges are transmitted to LPA through interactive video conferencing.  This program is referred to as the concurrent enrollment program.  The purpose of concurrent enrollment (CE) is to provide a challenging college-level experience for students in their last two years of high school.  Course offerings include Math, Science, Social Studies, Language Arts, Fine Arts and Humanities. More information about CE can be found in Appendix

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities shall meet general graduation requirements with appropriate accommodations and curricular modifications as determined by their Individual Education Plans (IEP's) The IEP Team may amend graduation requirements and must document in the IEP the nature and extent of any modifications, substitutions, and/or exemptions made to accommodate the needs of a student with disabilities. For more information, see LPA's IDEA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Transfer Students

The District will approve credits and grades received from an accredited public or private school.  Credit earned at a school accredited by the Utah State Board of Education or the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges is accepted at face value at LPA. Credit authorizations shall be in the form of official transcripts from the granting entity. Parents and students will be notified that official transcripts must be received by April 1 of each calendar year to provide time for APA staff to verify the credits and post them to the APA transcript. Credit earned at non-accredited schools must be reviewed by the LPA's  Credit Evaluation Committee.

Foreign Exchange/Transfer and Privately Placed Foreign Students

The intent of the foreign exchange program is not to provide a diploma to foreign students, but to provide a rich cultural experience in an American high school without the pressure of meeting the same set of standards expected of our students.

  • Foreign exchange students will be given placement tests by a guidance counselor upon acceptance to LPA so that an appropriate class schedule can be determined.
  • Foreign exchange students are expected to follow all rules, policies and fee requirements of LPA.
  • Foreign students shall not be allowed to enroll if they have already graduated in their home country.
  • Foreign students desiring a high school diploma must meet all District graduation requirements.
  • Foreign students who enroll at LPA high schools should be given copies of graduation standards at the time of their enrollment.
  • Foreign students planning to graduate and who are submitting transcripts in languages other than English, must bear the responsibility and cost for translation. Transcripts must provide:

course titles;

course descriptions;

grade achieved, with grading scale;

credit issued;

course length; and

grade levels completed.

Transcript evaluations will be completed under guidelines developed by LPA's Credit Evaluation Committee.

  • Notice of intent to apply for graduation needs to be received by October 1 of the school year in which the student wishes to graduate.  All transcripts and related documentation must be submitted by December 1 of that year, otherwise, the student will not be  considered for graduation diploma
  • Foreign students who meet District and State graduation requirements will be eligible for graduation and related ceremonies. Students who meet Certification of Completion requirements will be eligible to participate in ceremonies related to graduation and/or completion.

Notification of Failing Grade/Citizenship

Earnest and persistent effort will be made to provide notice to the parent or guardian of a student receiving a failing grade or pending loss of citizenship credit, allowing time to remediate the grade or citizenship problem.

Graduation Ceremony

Legacy Preparatory Academy recognizes that a student's graduation is a culmination of years of planning and successful completion of State and District requirements.  Legacy Preparatory Academy' Governing Board views this accomplishment as a great achievement, and wishes to recognize that achievement in a publicly celebrated graduation exercise.  Graduates receiving diplomas will be specially recognized at the graduation ceremony.

  • Participation in the graduation ceremony is an opportunity and not a protected property right.  Participation may be denied as a disciplinary measure, or if student refuses to comply with graduation ceremony standards.
  • Participation in the graduation ceremony is optional and is not required.
  • Caps and gowns will be worn in the proper manner as designated by the school administration.
  • Special needs students shall be provided with the opportunity to participate in ceremonies utilizing criteria based upon their unique circumstances as outlined in the Student with Disabilities section above.
  • Students earning a certificate of completion may participate in graduation ceremonies, with a Certificate of Completion designation.


Course Selection and Schedule Change Policy

It is the belief of LPA that students in the secondary grades and their parents/guardians should give serious consideration when selecting courses. The master schedule is constructed and faculty is assigned classes based on the number of original student course requests made during the scheduling process.  Because it is the responsibility of the school to encourage careful and advanced planning for the future, student will be given at least 2-3 weeks to consider course selections and to ask questions of parents, teachers, and counselors before making their final selections for the coming year. This policy is created to give secondary students and their parents/guardians an opportunity to make timely and efficient decisions regarding course selections.

Students MAY NOT make changes later, as allocation decisions for the following year are based on student course requests.


Schedule Adjustments during the week before school and  the first week of each semester will be limited to:

  • When the school has made an error (such as a student does not have a full schedule)
  • A student did not pass a class that was required and/or the student's schedule does not meet grade level or graduation requirements
  • A student does not meet the prerequisites for a class
  • Summer school coursework necessitates a change in the student's schedule

Admittance into classes at the semester may require teacher approval.


Schedule Adjustments during the first seven weeks of the semester will be limited to:

  • Students can drop an extra class while maintaining a minimum credit load on track for graduation. However, after the third week of the semester, the only class that a student can take is Home Release.
  • Teacher initiated level changes for a student
  • IEP/504 accommodations
  •  A student with a parent or guardian's consent may request a schedule change due to extenuating circumstances. The request will be reviewed and determined on a case by case basis with the school counselor and director or director's designee.


Dropping A Class (Withdrawals)

  • Classes cannot be dropped after the 7th week. Drops after the 7th week will result in a grade of "F" for the semester.
  • Drops made after the first day of school require a completed drop form..


Fees for Schedule changes are as follows:

  • Before first day of school:  No Fee   
  • After first day of school:  $10.00 (Applies to all changes made during the school year except in cases when a student's Math or English placement needs to be changed)  


LPA's Promotion Policy

LPA's promotion policy will determine student's ability to move to the next grade. Students will automatically be recommended for promotion if they meet the following criteria:

1.  A student should pass all subjects three quarters of the year with a C or better.

2.  A student should attend school a minimum of 170 days.

3.  A student should pass at least the lowest level of the skills classes for their grade level reading and mathematics.

4.  A student should not have been suspended during the school year.

Administration will review all relevant documents for students who are not recommended for promotion and make a determination based on concrete data that sufficiently demonstrate the student's inability to be successful at the next grade level.

C. Extra-Curricular Activities

Student Organizations and Clubs

The goal of all student organizations and clubs is to provide students with affordable, fun, and educational activities which will help to enrich student's experiences at LPA.  All student organizations and clubs must be preapproved by the administration and are required to have a staff member or adult advisor. Membership in clubs and other organizations of the school must be based on objective criteria that permit all students to compete for membership without prejudice as to race, religion, creed, financial status or subjective judgment of their peers.

With the assistance of the Community Outreach Specialist, activities can be advertised on school bulletin boards, in school newsletters and newspapers and on the school website.

LPA Team/Group Activity Policy

Being a member of a sports team, performing group or school sponsored club at LPA is a privilege.  Students who participate are expected to be upstanding citizens of the school, and as such will abide by the following policy.

Attitude - Students will bring a positive attitude which is conducive to the progress of the group/team when attending practice, rehearsal, game or performance.  An atmosphere of organization, dedication, and discipline will be maintained. 

Grades - Students are required to maintain a high academic standing at all times.  If the student's grade point average falls below a 2.5, the student will not be able to participate until the grade is made up.

Behavior - students are expected to show respect for all other participants, advisors, coaches, parents and officials.  The students are also expected to show respect and citizenship in all of their academic classes.  Any student with a "U" will not be able to play until the citizenship letter is worked off.

School Attendance - Attendance at school is mandatory.  If students are not at school on performance or game day, they may not be able to participate, this is left to the discretion of the advisor or coach.  (It is the responsibility of the student or parents to contact the advisor or coach if the student is sick and unable to attend).

Participation  - Participants are expected to attend and be on time to all group/team functions.  Emergencies, such as a death in the family are excused.  Major sicknesses are also excused but it is the student's responsibility to e-mail or call the advisor or coach the day of the sickness.  Other exceptions will be evaluated on a case by case basis and must be approved in advance.

Responsibilities:

Advisor/Coach Responsibilities:

  • Teach fundamentals and skills of the activity or sport.
  • Be prepared for all practices, rehearsals, performances and/or games. Help with preparation and clean up for all performances/games.
  • Supervise all team/group members at all events (until the last student is picked up from practice or a game/performance).
  • Teach and demonstrate good sportsmanship; Set an example for the participants and the spectators. Treat all participants with the same high level of respect. Encourage all individuals to play as a team.
  • Sign out to students/distribute uniforms and equipment.

Player Responsibilities:

  • Follow all grades and citizenship policies listed above.
  • Get a physical with clearance to participate in a school sport or activity (at the participant's expense).
  • Practice good sportsmanship.  Treat all advisors, coaches, volunteers, teammates, officials, and opposing competitors with respect. Any arising issues should be settled with the coach or advisor in a conference and not in front of the other participants or during a performance or game.
  • Attend all rehearsals, practices, performances and games; however, school work is a higher priority.
  • Pay fees (to be determined by activity or sport and costs each year).  The fee must be paid to the Business Office before the first game.
  • Return the team uniform or equipment in a timely manner.  Uniforms not returned will be charged at the replacement cost.

Parent Responsibilities:

  • Help student maintain academics and manage their time.
  • Help students get to rehearsals, practices, performances and games on time. Make sure the advisor or coach is notified by the appropriate time if your child will not be at school, rehearsal, practice, performance and/or a game.
  • Assist student in understanding the commitment they are making to the group/team.  Model good sportsmanship by treating all advisors, coaches, volunteers, participants, officials, and opposing competitors with respect.
  • Pay the activity or sports fee (to be determined by activity/sport ).  The fee must be paid to the Business Office before the first game or performance.

Participation in Extra-curricular Activities in Local Home District School

A student may try out for extra-curricular activities not offered by LPA, such as sports in his/her local home district school. However, LPA is not responsible for any fees or costs associated with participating in such activities.

LPA will attempt to make reasonable scheduling accommodations for participation in such activities. Activities  that will cause a student to miss LPA classes will interfere with the academic process and are strongly discouraged. The student will be held accountable for the consequences of missing classes while participating in extra-curricular activities in their local home district school.

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THE CASE FOR CURSIVE*

Last fall, the State Board of Education asked USOE to review the research on handwriting and make a determination about amending the Core Standards. As a state, we wanted to make a decision that was supported by research and was in the best interest of our students.

As the committee reviewed the research on current understandings of student learning, brain research, and literacy development, it was determined that handwriting (manuscript and cursive) is an important skill for students to learn. Explicit teaching and practice of writing allows students to assimilate correct letter formation and make the act of writing unconscious; this reduces their cognitive load when they begin to compose. Fluent writers are able to focus on generating ideas, producing grammatically correct text, and considering audience.

Even in a technology-based world, handwriting is important to support the creation of ideas and cognitive thinking. Keyboarding is an important skill, but putting the letters into the orthographic-motor memory is what helps students to compose and do higher-level work. Automatic writing also helps students become faster and more efficient as they develop their own hybrid of manuscript and cursive. 

This is not meant to be an onerous burden on teachers: research shows that 50-100 minutes a week of teaching and distributed practice are sufficient to develop writers.

The current Utah Core Standards can be viewed at: http://www.schools.utah.gov/core/

Thank you for your input.


Tiffany Hall

K-12 Literacy Coordinator

Teaching and Learning

Utah State Office of Education

Please note: Utah has a very broad public records law. Most written communications to or from state employees regarding state business are public records available to the public and media upon request. Your email communication may be subject to public disclosure.

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